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Order of the Arrow

Discussions for OA Members and those interested in Scouting's Honor Society. Also includes a private sub-forum for OA Members only.


Subforums

  1. Western Region

    Sections, Lodges and local discussions

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  2. NOAC

    Been to NOAC? Heading there? Chat about the Order's bi-annual gathering

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  3. Central Region

    Sections, Lodges and local discussions

    136
    posts
  4. Northeast Region

    Sections, Lodges and local discussions

    50
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  5. Southern Region

    Sections, Lodges and local discussion

    154
    posts

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  1. 1971 NOAC

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  2. 2015 NOAC

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  3. A Clean Sash? 1 2

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  4. A Lënape Carol

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  • LATEST POSTS

    • She has a lot of work to do because confirmation of portions are typically appealed more than rejections.  If she has issues with confirmation and must reject portions that becomes the BSA's problem to clean up.  If she confirms portions and say the insurers appeal then she needs to have her case law locked down.  Given the complexity of this and the historic nature and scope it should take a long time.  Something else to consider.  Judges ARE aware of news cycles.  A long Memorial Day weekend coming up?  The Friday before makes for a nice opportunity for s ruling when the press and others are preoccupied with days off.  Also, she does NOT have to schedule a court date to announce or read her decision.  Some judges like this and in Purdue Pharma Judge Drain read his decision for OVER two hours!  But, she can just post it to the docket at any moment of she wants!  Lastly, she can call in some parties to suggest her direction and see if they can cure a conflict prior to the final ruling.  But at this date, unless it''s happened and we don't know, it's probably past that.  It's coming....keep an eye on the docket and after we have the ruling don't fall for the spin.  There very well may be winners and losers so the first spin ANY group puts on this is theirs alone.  
    • Hello, some of you may now know me as the kid who really wants to join the OA. Well I am here to tell you guys that my journey has come to a sad end. I have tried all chances to join but none of them have turned out. My SM denied an election, surrounding troops wouldnt do dual enrollment, and even the lodge in the council neighboring has "ghosted' me. So I wish you all the best of luck with your journeys and you are truly all lucky to be involved in such a great organization and brotherhood. - A friend in scouting, 
    • I think the biggest problem is that is creates a paradigm which then must be dismantled. I disagree that it allows them to "get used to scouting" because that paradigm is fundamentally NOT scouting; what they are getting used to is adults being the leader. The idea of an adult continually whispering in their ear of a scout who is not prepared to be the leader denies the scouts the opportunity to experience scouting via an older Patrol leader. This experience will have positives and negatives which will help shape the younger scouts understanding. It will also affect how they ultimately lead when they are more prepared to do so. 
    • There is no doubt that our history has led to where we all are today.  The past created our present.  So a lot of people today are behind the eight-ball from the outset.  It will take generations to right the ship.  But, we've now also had generations of a relatively level playing field. My parents, born in the mid 1940s, were born poor.  My dad's family had to get water in a bucket from the neighbor to flush their toilets.  My mother was slightly better off but they did not own their own home when she was growing up, had ice delivery long after refrigerators were mainstream, and had no heat in their bedrooms to deal with Wisconsin winters.  Christmas gifts were limited to a new nightgown and slippers which had to last all year.  My dad's generation saw every male member of the household (and possibly the girls too, I don't know) get STEM college degrees.  They paid for this themselves and by each brother who graduated helping the one behind them.  My mother had an excellent civil service job and was making more than my father did out of college.   Consequently, I was set up for a good stable family and a college education, and now my children are also.  Generational excellence builds quickly - if the parents make good choices. I feel like we've had a pretty equal playing field for the last 50 years.  Certainly the last 30.  Much of what I see in regards to inequity today is the result of poor parental choices vastly over the sins of the past.  Now, I will say that many of these bad parental choices are made simply because the parents have never had good role models and thus don't even understand what the potential is out there let along how to go about achieving it.  This is where it is going to take time for families to grow up and discover how to play the game of life to get ahead. It's also true that the world has changed from 50 years ago.  Wages have not kept up with inflation.  You could buy a house 50 years ago for a couple of times an annual wage.  Today it's 10 times that.  College is vastly more expensive now (though there are still lower cost community college options).  Most people have to take out loans to go to school and this makes them start out their working lives with tens or even hundreds of thousands of dollars in debt.  The days of getting any degree and being successful are over. So while I feel the playing field is pretty level today, it's also more rocky than it used to be.  People have to work harder today to make it than they used to.  That's life. Neal Boortz used to say something like the way to make it in life was to follow a simple formula:  Stay in school.  Don't do drugs.  Don't get pregnant.  Get a job, any job, and work hard at it.  You back this up with the Scout Oath and the Scout Law and I think you have as good a shot as anybody to have a decent life.
    • Here’s my question: Is that really a problem? Acknowledging your other concerns and focusing on this one, what’s wrong with their first year in Scouting being an AOL 2, with the Patrol Advisor continually whispering in the PL’s ear, while the new Scouts get used to Scouting? That’s basically how new troops work in my experience; why not new patrols? Heck, even in established troops it can work that way if the older Scouts have gone inactive or aged out and younger Scouts are leading the troop. 
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