Jump to content

All Activity

This stream auto-updates

  1. Yesterday
  2. This seems like an untapped idea. We can all think of orgs who could share camps: Y, school outdoor ed, Campfire, churches, even the Girl Scouts. It is crazy that all of these orgs struggle to have, maintain, and use their camps. If we shared it could just work. I don’t know.
  3. "I’m not following your point. In your council activities are not done due to fear of legal repercussions?" No, our council has mothballed our main camp and the other is on the sales block, so we have no local camp anymore. Their reasoning was arrived at by a small group of people, most of whom had not real contact with the program or camp directly. While most unit reviews of the camp were always very positive, there were some that focused on things NOT there, such as a lake, and also on our annual dining hall struggles that were affected in part by some odd legal things about not fixin
  4. I’m not following your point. In your council activities are not done due to fear of legal repercussions? Probably the biggest legal hardship for our camps is the requirement of a sprinkler system for buildings housing more than 4 unrelated people (or something like that). Due to that new cabins will be tough in the future.
  5. Aaron on Scouting continues to share great items on his FB page, things most might be able to try if they were not paranoid about the legal vultures. https://blog.scoutingmagazine.org/2024/07/12/celebrating-100-years-of-camp-gorton-plus-other-positive-news-this-week-in-scouting/ And it is not just Scouting, it is many other once community focussed groups and clubs that did things because it needed to be done, and they were not afraid o be sued if something went awry. Technically the non profits and good samaritans are shielded, but the twisting of intent and meaning has made many
  6. IMHO the answer is LOCAL and CIVIC ACTIVITY. As important as the "outing" is in Scouting, by definition our hiking/camping conceals us from our wider potential market. The physical (including the 'outing') is the thrill that will retain a scout who's already in the door. But what's needed is visibility to the wider market. While that 12 year old is the "end user", never forget the Customer is the one who pays the bills (i,e, Mom). If we want more 12 year old scouts, we need more Local visibility to Moms. That means setting out flags at Memorial/Independence days, marching in Veteran'
  7. Seems very low key vs the photo shoots of the past few years.
  8. Some of my favorite memories are watching from a distance as my sons split wood with an ax. I'd be far away and nervous as heck, but it was very maturing for them. And confidence building.
  9. I am not as active as I once was (or would like to be) but in my time as a Scout (dim past) and adult Scouter (blurry present) I must say my observation here would be that the Scout is not so concerned with numbers, but with using the hatchet he/she was given for their birthday, seeing if that new way of tieing boot laces works or really canoeing that last mile (when the planned take out was closed and 5 extra miles of paddling had to be passed). All Scouting is local. Even the National Jamboree and Philmont and Seabase are local. The "locality" must be supported and encouraged by
  10. Last week
  11. Curious what the actual membership numbers are. BSA (Sorry SA) has not been overly transparent of late with that data
  12. Update 7/11/2024: Today, 2024 National Chief of the Order of the Arrow, David Gosik, presented Congressman Pete Sessions with a copy of the 2024 Report to the Nation. Congressman Sessions also was introduced to BSA CEO Roger Krone. Source: https://www.instagram.com/congressmanpetesessions/p/C9QjCNHyOme/ https://x.com/PeteSessions/status/1811163116178395232
  13. And now I do not go to camp as my body does not like it much. I miss it though, but need to be smart. They do not need me having another major health issue while there. Right now, we do not even have a local camp anyway, though the younger leaders are taking them to a unit week not too far away. As one local leader says regularly after posting photos; "get 'em out there".
  14. Yep, it is the acclimating that is important. And that always included my telling the members, adult and kids, that the swim check was NOT a race, and they could wait a day if need. We went from sea level, literally, to a mile hight or more most years. Between the hot, dry atmosphere and unheated pool, or other water, it could zap you. As I got older, I always did my check the following day, both because of the change, but also my trying to keep up with the routines.
  15. As a retired Occupational Safety and Health professional, I think the biggest factor is not global warming, but the lack of acclimatization of people, especially the youth. People who routinely work and play outdoors develop a physiological tolerance to heat, and not much of that happens anymore. Most of us arrive at Camp having just emerged from cool environments of home, office, cars, etc. Back in the 1900s when my kids were young scouts, we had a house rule that the AC didn't get turned on in the house, until we returned from Summer Camp. Up until camp, usually the week after 4th of Jul
  16. "Again, the best way to prepare for heat-related illnesses is to prevent the illness." I remember back in the day, wearing a cold-water soaked, full-size necker.* I do worry that global warming with more frequent, severe storms and heat waves will cause the extinction of summer camp. https://www.scouting.org/health-and-safety/safety-moments/heat-related-illness/ *Note: Though hard to find on the trail, wrist dipping in a cooler with ice water mix also offers relief too.
  17. ... and this outstanding piece published last Friday in The Dispatch "Scouting Hasn't Lost Itself" (subtitled "Girls now have more opportunities for Scouting’s formative experiences."): https://thedispatch.com/article/scouting-hasnt-lost-itself/
  18. Throwing a log on fire with a relevant story All-girl Scout troop from Brunswick takes to the high seas for adventure camp Great story about why these girls chose to join Boy Scouts and their Sea Base trek. It was 1. Program, name was not an issue, these girls wanted to Scout, 2. parents stepping up to deliver Program - character building, service, ADVENTURE, skills. IMHO this success story is repeated daily in units across the country, Gender is irrelevant as are High Adventure Bases. Get kids who want to Scout and adults who will deliver the Program ...membership gr
  19. ABC News: Children who fled Russian invasion find community in Ukrainian scouting organization in Canada https://abcnews.go.com/International/children-fled-russian-invasion-find-community-ukrainian-scouting/story?id=111568550
  20. Earlier
  21. Only topic-adjacent, but I sincerely wonder if anyone has ever even tried to join anything from the Lotus Sutra with the rest of the service. Other than that worshiping deities is a sideshow at best and a departure from the path at worst, the Lotus Sutra builds so much on foundational teachings that it assumes that the reader knows that it would be very hard to cite only it unless the audience are all Mahayana practicioners already. Relatedly, some Theravada practicioners might take offense at the lesser vehicle/hinayana thing, and seeing as the sutra expounds on the difference between arhatsh
  22. You might reach out to Chip Turner -- he's the Chaplain Coordinator at Philmont. Great guy.
  23. Thank you. This post is good materials for an interfaith service, but unfortunately, it is not what I am looking for. The Worship book from Philmont was about 25 pages long and had all Protestantism based material.
  24. Not sure how to add this as a "file" , but here goes..... “…to do my duty to God…” 29 April, 2011 Blue Ridge Center , WVA ** Opening/Welcome **BSA Promise and Law: Universal? **Scouting as a religion? Or religious organization? ”Declaration of Religious Principle” **B-P’s Quotes: the origin, the result… **Us or Them? WHY “Scout’s Own”? ** INclusive or INsulting? Choices::: Nada, Particular, Sort of (with understanding but mushy), Spiritually Suggestive HOW? ** Setting : Apart, special,
  25. This document was an amazing resource for finding material for interfaith services. I had the PDF bookmarked, but the link is now broken. I guess I should have downloaded it. And nothing shows up when I google search it. https://filestore.scouting.org/filestore/philmont/pdf/ProtWorshipBook.pdf
  26. The group calls themselves ‘BOOTS’, which they say stands for Brotherhood of Old Tired Scouts, and they have been hiking and biking through the trails at Cameron Park for nearly 30 years, training for camping trips and helping maintain the park. “We have an adventure group,” Scott Littrell, known as ‘Mad Dog’ to his friends, said. “We go out twice a year on adventures, but we hang around a lot together. We mountain bike, we hike, we maintain trails, we fish, you name it, outdoorsy stuff.” He said the group formed out of their sons’ boy scout troop around 27 years ago. “It starte
  27. Related story: Fourteen year old scout Lily Johnson earned the National Medal for Outdoor Achievement completing 127 nights of camping, over 500 miles of hiking, 85 hours of conservation work, a wilderness first aid course, became a Leave No Trace level one instructor, earned four 50-miler awards and planned two outings for the scout troop – including one 50-mile backpacking trip. “Once I get Eagle I want to just be a model for other scouts,” said Lily, who hopes to inspire other scouts to “do cool things.” Lily isn’t going to let the outdoor adventures end when their scouting c
  1. Load more activity
  • Posts

    • This seems like an untapped idea. We can all think of orgs who could share camps: Y, school outdoor ed, Campfire, churches, even the Girl Scouts. It is crazy that all of these orgs struggle to have, maintain, and use their camps. If we shared it could just work. I don’t know. 
    • "I’m not following your point. In your council activities are not done due to fear of legal repercussions?" No, our council has mothballed our main camp and the other is on the sales block, so we have no local camp anymore.  Their reasoning was arrived at by a small group of people, most of whom had not real contact with the program or camp directly.  While most unit reviews of the camp were always very positive, there were some that focused on things NOT there, such as a lake, and also on our annual dining hall struggles that were affected in part by some odd legal things about not fixing just some things; it was all or nothing apparently with the local code people.  I do not know for sure, but I was told they even made notes of any serial numbers on older equipment, and said it they were replaced, then all the other stuff had to be done as well.  Drought also has affected, but mostly the seriously skewed report based on poor info and using a National sheet for camp expectations.  Much of the stuff on those "expectations is "pie in the sky" and smaller camps are un likely to be able to do them.  Yet, we have unique facilities too, such as a quarter scale authentic frontier fort which has been made into a campfire amphitheatre, and very good access to mountain bike trails and higher trek locations in the area.  You can hike to the top of a 2000 foot plus mountain and camp on its back ridge, for example.  And that has been a part of programming along with the many mountain bike trails.  The final straw seems to be the lawsuit, in my view.  But, it was also related to a very poor council communication and poor planning, and perhaps some other issues.  When the uprising happened they got rid of the SE, but they have not reached out to the actual users of the site which, still could be open to basic camping and special events without having summer camp.  Limbo time, and still a less than, in many local Scouters' view, good focus on the program and youth.  They simply seem, to me, to not care to reach outside the box.  The camp, and its predecessor were both made possible by the local community involvement, and I do not see any real effort to appeal to that, though it seems, to me, to be there still.   Finding cooperative partners to use the site, while not making summer camp viable with our small size, would still be possible with a bit of imagination and so on. As far as other organizations, the lawsuit and its predator lawyers has put fear into many on the legal front.  The threat of CO's being dragged in on flimsy data killed many units and has badly wounded others.  Even though the issues are not now, or ever were, just Scouting problems.  They just did something no body else did; keep records to try to stop negative things, corrup;ted of course to the Perversion Files by the lawyers.  Yes, poor decisions were made in some cases, and even one is not forgivable, but it was not the pattern of the BSA, but an intrusion of the large societal issues.  JMO of course, and I recognize a few will find it deplorable.  Complete rehabilitation is not likely really possible.  But surely it is clear progress has occurred and IF we follow ALL the guidelines, most likely issues will be diminished.  But Scouting America cannot ever solve the larger societal issues, only do their best to defend themselves and their youth.  
    • I’m not following your point. In your council activities are not done due to fear of legal repercussions?   Probably the biggest legal hardship for our camps is the requirement of a sprinkler system for buildings housing more than 4 unrelated people (or something like that). Due to that new cabins will be tough in the future. 
    • Aaron on Scouting continues to share great items on his FB page, things most might be able to try if they were not paranoid about the legal vultures. https://blog.scoutingmagazine.org/2024/07/12/celebrating-100-years-of-camp-gorton-plus-other-positive-news-this-week-in-scouting/   And it is not just Scouting, it is many other once community focussed groups and clubs that did things because it needed to be done, and they were not afraid o be sued if something went awry.  Technically the non profits and good samaritans are shielded, but the twisting of intent and meaning has made many not want to try, as the cost of defending is just too high, even if they might win at the end.  And we all know that there have been some really ignorant judicial judgments, and suits that most osther countries would toss at the start.   It is not helped by well meaning local rules, also based on shallow thinking because something unusual happened and somebody was harmed.  It was not like to be an issue again if review with clear thinking, but again, our system makes it too difficult and expensive.  We are on the edge of losing our only viable camp due to deferred repairs, mostly brought on by too many regulations that simply should not apply, nor keep other repairs from happening.  Permits for one thing should not logically impact permits for a totally different thng; yet they seem to often do.  Many activities carry a small possibility of injury, no matter what you do.  If someone trips on a tent stake, is that really negligence, or just a sleepy or careless person?  If a mountain biker falls is that reason to simply ban the program?  It appears that is the case in some places.  And this applies to say the Elks, Lions too.  The threat of legal attachments on these beneficial groups by the greedy chasers has made many afraid to support not just Scouting America, but many other things in communities.  These groups were, and still could be, major factors in better communities and society.   From my perspective of 8 plus decades, it seems clear that we need not only a serious rework of our legal system, but maybe a magic wand to put bring back "common sense".  Just my couple of dollars, once two cents, worth.
    • IMHO the answer is LOCAL and CIVIC ACTIVITY.  As important as the "outing" is in Scouting, by definition our hiking/camping conceals us from our wider potential market. The physical (including the 'outing') is the thrill that will retain a scout who's already in the door.  But what's needed is visibility to the wider market.  While that 12 year old is the "end user", never forget the Customer is the one who pays the bills (i,e, Mom).  If we want more 12 year old scouts, we need more Local visibility to Moms.  That means setting out flags at Memorial/Independence days, marching in Veteran's Day parades, planting trees at Arbor Day, Thanksgiving food drives, singing carols at old folk's homes, etc.  AND POST THE PICTURES & CONTACT INFO on Facebook, Twitter(X), & Instagram! Yes, by all means get LOCAL, but we need to get visible through CIVIC ACTIVITY.
  • Who's Online (See full list)

    There are no registered users currently online

  • Popular Contributors

×
×
  • Create New...