Jump to content

All Activity

This stream auto-updates     

  1. Past hour
  2. scoutldr

    Qualities of an Eagle

    They took "A Scout is Friendly" to a whole new level. I was once the District Rep on an EBOR and as we were reading the letters of recommendation, one was from his sister who was heaping praise on her brother for being such a good father. The two were still "living in sin" under her parents' roof. Well, the Troop Committee members were livid, primarily because we were blindsided by the SM who thought it wasn't "relevant". It was not a unanimous vote. The scout appealed to Council, who rubber stamped it. The CO was a Methodist Church.
  3. I don't generally wear the temporary patches, but occasionally want to. When I do, they ALWAYS fall off at some point. Is there a good way to keep them affixed? Should I just give up? TIA.
  4. fred johnson

    Starting a new troop: Budget items

    I've been in multiple troops that do it differently. Scouts bringing their own tent makes life easier for the adults. BUT, there are lots of benefits to the troop owning the tents. It gives the QM something meaningful to do. It gives the troop things to do at meetings (setup, clean, put away, etc). It's also a great leveling aspect as everyone has the same stuff. It doesn't become a competition for who has the best tent. Also, you can avoid scouts bringing party tents. I swear half the trouble at night is when you have five or six scouts sharing one tent. There is something about two in a tent that causes them to fall asleep faster. Most importantly, everyone having matching tents makes for a sharp looking camp site. Our troop had matching tents for ten plus years. We replace one every other year or so. Now, I'd say we are at about one new tent a year and we have 15+ in our trailer. For a new troop, I'd avoid big cost items. Heck, I'd think it might be cool to have a patrol go to a second hand shop (goodwill, savers, ...) and have them pick out what they need. Silverware. Plates. Cups. Skillets. Etc. It would be a cool way to stock a patrol. Plus, when the patrol crashes, donate that patrol's stuff and let the new patrol go shopping again. I bet you could get most of the cook stuff for under $20 from a second hand shop. Except lanterns and stove.
  5. qwazse

    Starting a new troop: Budget items

    The problem about tarps (and most modern tents with low-slung flys) in winter: to keep "exhalation frost" from building up on everything, it's actually best to allow for a lot of ventilation. So the trick is proper alignment of vents, and bodies. That requires lots of practice that 1st years obviously do not have. In the days canvas floorless tents, piling snow around piled around the walls of the tent not only blocked wind, but attracted condensation. So even in calm frozen nights when the flaps weren't kicking open, canvas walls were frost-free on the inside. (Although folding them at the base could be rough if you packed the snow to tight!)
  6. Today
  7. packsaddle

    Qualities of an Eagle

    MattR, your comment regarding cheating resonates with me because these patterns of deception seem to become established when quite young (and perhaps they're innate, I don't know) but I see many examples of even older young people (not a typo) in my classes. And they seem to have a different understanding of what 'honesty' is from what I think and was taught. You can see some of this in the way that so-called votes are given during these so-called talent shows after which text messages are used to tally the vote. Evidently it is common to allow multiple 'votes' from each 'voter' if they want to take the time and expense to do it. While I couldn't care less about what happens on one of those vapid wastes of time, the 'anything goes' idea seems to fix itself into their other activities as well. So I spend considerable time and effort in defeating these things when it comes time for assessment. And, once again, I suspect that if the monkeys were intelligent enough to engage in the same behavior, they would. My point, then, is that whatever we can do to give them the tools for making fewer risky or harmful decisions will make things much better in the long run. The Eagle father-to-be, I hope, will take his responsibilities as a father seriously and I also hope that his adult peers can offer help and support to make sure his mistake doesn't harm a person who had no choice whatsoever on how to enter this world.
  8. cocomax

    New girls in Scouting

    Family scouting is all about the WHOLE FAMILY going on outings and activities together. So that moms and dads can spend more time together with their boys and girls in a scouting setting. -------------- Julie Anderson has been there. Like most parents, she laments not being able to spend enough quality time with her two children, Ian and Samantha. That’s why Anderson is such a fan of Family Scouting, the BSA’s push to welcome all members of the family into our life-changing movement. Do you crave more time with your children and less time bouncing between drop-offs and pickups? "She’s pumped to share the ways Family Scouting will appeal to moms and dads out there. It lets parents “take the whole family on outings and activities for scheduled fun family time,” she says." https://blog.scoutingmagazine.org/2018/06/08/as-bsa-welcomes-families-into-scouting-some-councils-are-adding-a-family-scouting-director/
  9. DuctTape

    Starting a new troop: Budget items

    A tarp can be configured to be an enclosed tent. But, you are correct about first time in Feb.
  10. Eagle1993

    Starting a new troop: Budget items

    Definitely a good idea. We had a local Troop run a service project once where they colllected old camping gear from the scouting community. These could be individually owned or old Troop equipment. The scouts then setup and tested the equipment and donated the usable items to new or struggling Troops. I thought this as a great idea as there is a lot of equipment gathering dust.
  11. qwazse

    Starting a new troop: Budget items

    Well about 1/2 or fewer bring their own tents. Boys decide among themselves who's bringing whose tent. The "or fewer" is on account of older scouts who tend to be "tarpologists" or hammockers. I've encouraged this out of memories of being in college in the big city and wanting to "get out" but not having ever bought a tent of my own and suddenly on a tight budget, I had to rely on the generosity of strangers. Son #1 came into the troop with a family-size armory of canvas. He soon saved up for his own (or got it for a present, can't remember). Mrs. Q, would bargain hunt and garage sale. so our family was well stocked with the intention that our kids would be able to provide for their buddies. Other families were of similar ilk. And, most of us don't like to see gear sitting idle. I guess it depends on the culture of your community. The troop does have a small collection of lightweight models for boys who want to try a backpacking tent.
  12. walk in the woods

    Starting a new troop: Budget items

    Talk to your CO about making a startup donation. Also talk with them about service opportunities your young scouts could take on right away.
  13. Treflienne

    Starting a new troop: Budget items

    There are an overwhelming number of tents available for sale, all different types. A reccomendation of what to buy, that would be suitable for scouts camping with the troop, would be helpful for the families, if you decide to go this route.
  14. shortridge

    One Scout dead, another injured climbing (OR)

    With respect, you’re jumping to conclusions and condemning people when the information available at this point simply doesn’t bear that out. We have no idea about the circumstances, training, supervision or equipment used.
  15. ParkMan

    Starting a new troop: Budget items

    Our troop is the same. Our Scouts all own their own tents. When Scouts cross over from Webelos, they work as a group to see who has tents. Generally there are enough tents amongst them that we get 2 or 3 scouts in a tent. Over the first year or two in the troop most scouts acquire their own and then we have plenty. Occasionally we have to scare up a tent or two - but not that often. I like this model as troop tents are expensive and high maintenance. Scouts also tend to take better care of things they own and tents are fragile. Unless you come from an economically disadvantaged area, I'd see if you'd get enough families willing to buy their scouts a tent in order to make it work. I'd stay away from tarps.
  16. Eagledad

    Starting a new troop: Budget items

    Call the DE or Committee Commissioner, explain the situation and ask if they know of a troop that can loan a couple of tents, stoves and cooking equipment. There may even be a Chartering Organization with a defunct troop looking to move their equipment. Barry
  17. shortridge

    Starting a new troop: Budget items

    That’s a model I’ve heard of but not seen in action. Do your Scouts all own and bring their own tents? Tents are the biggest-pricetag item, for sure. I’ve been looking at DIY tarp options, but the psychological factor of a first camping trip in February with “just a tarp” may be a lot to overcome. Thanks for the other comments!
  18. DuctTape

    Starting a new troop: Budget items

    A start-up can seem daunting, especially with "no patrol gear". I will focus on just this aspect. As it can also provide for the best opportunities for the scouts to learn and grow. Scouts will all need their own personal camping gear anyway. Start there. They can either budget and buy, or DIY. Mess kit, scout knife, utensils, sleeping bag/mat, backpack. Cooking can be done as individuals in a patrol setting. Imagine each scout prepping and cooking their own meal (or as buddies) with their personal mess kits (or aluminum foil) over an open fire. They will learn quickly before they cook for a group. They will also learn who are the best cooks in the patrol, as well as the best fire-makers, etc... For sleeping. The scouts all need their own sleeping bag. Poly tarps are cheap and make great shelters. Buddies learn to pitch them as enclosed shelters, or open. As a patrol, they are all near each other. With multiple pitch styles, they also learn who is best at erecting a tarp shelter and tying knots and lashings. The upfront costs here are minimal for the rope and tarps. For a camping area, the scouts can find a private property owner who is willing to let them camp on his property. The scouts usually offer to do a service project as a trade. Even if it is just picking up trash. Many property owners are extremely happy to accomodate. To start building patrol gear, scouts can raise money through fundraisers, or build their own. For purchasing, I recommend scrounging yard sales for pots, pans, utensils, axes, saws, tents, etc... I have picked up enough gear to outfit full troops for pennies on the dollar. The great thing about the cheap used stuff is that it was cheap. Its ok if it gets wrecked as they are learning to use it.
  19. danielhenry12

    One Scout dead, another injured climbing (OR)

    Sorry to hear that, but we all know that climbing is very risky sport and therefore it becomes mandatory for all climbers to take all safety precautions while going for climbing. How could trainers allow children to climb without any safety kits. Its very disappointing. I pray to God that the injured child will may recover soon.
  20. WisconsinMomma

    Irwindale (CA) Girls abused in Police Explorers Unit

    DeMarco is calling for reform so that no young person ever be allowed to ride along with officers alone. "Ride-alongs should have either two officers and one explorer, or one officer and two explorers at all times," he said. Yes.
  21. WisconsinMomma

    Targeting Boy with False Allegations

    Bystanders are also important in helping prevention. The new YPT training helps with this a lot.
  22. A 16 year scout climbing with a friend when a rock handhold gave way causing his fall. The friend was nearby and attempted to help but was also injured. The two teenaged boys had fallen in the remote area of Middle Rosary Lake in Northern Klamath County while on a camping trip with their Boy Scout Troop from Corvallis, Oregon https://www.klamathfallsnews.org/news/one-dead-one-injured-in-scout-camping-trip
  23. WonderBoy

    Any place for an evening shift worker

    As a stay-at-home dad, it's amazing how much of the work supporting my sons' Cub Scout Pack goes on during the day. Trips to our Council office to iron out problems or pick up supplies (advancement or otherwise) from the Scout Shop. Running over to the school where we met to deal with scheduling issues and access our things in our storage closest. Going to our school district offices for usage agreements for the school spaces. Deposits to our bank. Popping into our local Park District to reserve shelters for our outdoor events and our annual pool rental for family swim night. If a few of our volunteers didn't have the privilege of at least slipping away from work for "lunch", I'm not sure how we would function. So there's plenty to do. It may not be the volunteer work you'd prefer to do, but a lot of the time it's the necessary, invisible work that's required to make things happen. Just my $0.02, YMMV and my free advice is worth every penny you paid for it.
  24. fred johnson

    Targeting Boy with False Allegations

    I pray that incidents like your daughter experienced NEVER cause people to avoid reporting. Did your daughter report this follow-on incident? Did her friends? I'd hope he was expelled, was charged and faced juvenile court punishments. Reporting is critical. I fully believe future victims are created by not reporting. The most visible example of this is Harvey Weinstein's 87 victims over 30+ years. If early victims would have spoke up, perhaps 50 or 60 or 70 fewer victims would have been created.
  25. qwazse

    Starting a new troop: Budget items

    In terms of budget cycle, most troops want to take stock of accounts after all summer camp money is spent. That would include purchases of awards for the CoH. The checkbook balance is probably your lowest at that point. Our troop doesn't have tents. So, I can't tell you when to make those purchases for those new webelos. But, it sounds like you're on the right track of making a reasonable plan for growth, that helps set the mark for fundraisers.
  26. ParkMan

    Starting a new troop: Budget items

    Hi @shortridge, I've not been through this with a new unit, but have spent quite a bit of time watching unit budgeting and how we spend. For what it's worth, here's my thoughts. 1) your budget needs to cover awards, meeting supplies, training. If you need to rent a space, it would need to cover that. 2) ideally your budget would have enough extra money to allow you to cover campsite reservations 3) For the first year or two, I think you could forego equipment expenses. However, you need to assess if your troop families can provide the equipment. In our troop, many scouts and families have accumulated equipment and so we could do this. If your families can not provide equipment, I think you'd want to cover basic camp gear too. My basic financial model would be: - dues to cover operating expenses for the year. Collect these upfront. - charge up front per event. Do signups early and ask families to pay in advance. - I'd plan to run a surplus. i.e., you want to have $500 in the bank at the end of the year to build up reserves. - conduct fundraisers of some sort to raise capital for big ticket expenses. if you find your families cannot supply equipment then set a goal to fundraise to acquire it.
  27. Treflienne

    New girls in Scouting

    Even if there were studies that showed that girls were, on average, paid more attention to organizational details, that doesn't remove the worth of the patrol method for the girls. Firstly, because averages are just that. There is also a broad distribution, for both girls and boys, of instinctive organizational skill levels. Some girls are a lot less naturally organized than some boys. Also patrols are not merely about learning to be organized. They are also about learning leadership in a kid-sized setting. They are about having the opportunity to try, and to mess up, and to overcome those mistakes --- all in a kid-sized setting. I would argue that the differences between boys and girls mean that single gender patrols are the way to go --- so that the girls don't end up doing the cooking while the boys do something else. Of course, since the troops won't be coed, neither will the patrols.
  1. Load more activity
  • Posts

    • They took "A Scout is Friendly" to a whole new level.  I was once the District Rep on an EBOR and as we were reading the letters of recommendation, one was from his sister who was heaping praise on her brother for being such a good father.  The two were still "living in sin" under her parents' roof.  Well, the Troop Committee members were livid, primarily because we were blindsided by the SM who thought it wasn't "relevant".  It was not a unanimous vote.  The scout appealed to Council, who rubber stamped it.  The CO was a Methodist Church.  
    • I don't generally wear the temporary patches, but occasionally want to.

      When I do, they ALWAYS fall off at some point.

      Is there a good way to keep them affixed? Should I just give up?

      TIA.
    • I've been in multiple troops that do it differently.  Scouts bringing their own tent makes life easier for the adults.  BUT, there are lots of benefits to the troop owning the tents.  It gives the QM something meaningful to do.  It gives the troop things to do at meetings (setup, clean, put away, etc).  It's also a great leveling aspect as everyone has the same stuff.  It doesn't become a competition for who has the best tent.  Also, you can avoid scouts bringing party tents.  I swear half the trouble at night is when you have five or six scouts sharing one tent.  There is something about two in a tent that causes them to fall asleep faster.  Most importantly, everyone having matching tents makes for a sharp looking camp site.   Our troop had matching tents for ten plus years.  We replace one every other year or so.  Now, I'd say we are at about one new tent a year and we have 15+ in our trailer.   For a new troop, I'd avoid big cost items.  Heck, I'd think it might be cool to have a patrol go to a second hand shop (goodwill, savers, ...) and have them pick out what they need.  Silverware.  Plates.  Cups.  Skillets.  Etc.  It would be a cool way to stock a patrol.  Plus, when the patrol crashes, donate that patrol's stuff and let the new patrol go shopping again.  I bet you could get most of the cook stuff for under $20 from a second hand shop.  Except lanterns and stove.  
    • The problem about tarps (and most modern tents with low-slung flys) in winter: to keep "exhalation frost" from building up on everything, it's actually best to allow for a lot of ventilation. So the trick is proper alignment of vents, and bodies. That requires lots of practice that 1st years obviously do not have. In the days canvas floorless tents, piling snow around piled around the walls of the tent not only blocked wind, but attracted condensation. So even in calm frozen nights when the flaps weren't kicking open, canvas walls were frost-free on the inside. (Although folding them at the base could be rough if you packed the snow to tight!)
    • MattR, your comment regarding cheating resonates with me because these patterns of deception seem to become established when quite young (and perhaps they're innate, I don't know) but I see many examples of even older young people (not a typo) in my classes. And they seem to have a different understanding of what 'honesty' is from what I think and was taught.  You can see some of this in the way that so-called votes are given during these so-called talent shows after which text messages are used to tally the vote. Evidently it is common to allow multiple 'votes' from each 'voter' if they want to take the time and expense to do it. While I couldn't care less about what happens on one of those vapid wastes of time, the 'anything goes' idea seems to fix itself into their other activities as well. So I spend considerable time and effort in defeating these things when it comes time for assessment. And, once again, I suspect that if the monkeys were intelligent enough to engage in the same behavior, they would. My point, then, is that whatever we can do to give them the tools for making fewer risky or harmful decisions will make things much better in the long run. The Eagle father-to-be, I hope, will take his responsibilities as a father seriously and I also hope that his adult peers can offer help and support to make sure his mistake doesn't harm a person who had no choice whatsoever on how to enter this world.
  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • Popular Contributors

×