Jump to content

Order of the Arrow

Discussions for OA Members and those interested in Scouting's Honor Society. Also includes a private sub-forum for OA Members only.


Subforums

  1. Western Region

    Sections, Lodges and local discussions

    43
    posts
  2. NOAC

    Been to NOAC? Heading there? Chat about the Order's bi-annual gathering

    174
    posts
  3. Central Region

    Sections, Lodges and local discussions

    136
    posts
  4. Northeast Region

    Sections, Lodges and local discussions

    50
    posts
  5. Southern Region

    Sections, Lodges and local discussion

    154
    posts

575 topics in this forum

    • 29 replies
    • 7.5k views
  1. Scoutmaster O/A Sash 1 2

    • 29 replies
    • 7.6k views
    • 3 replies
    • 2.5k views
  2. so few left 1 2

    • 23 replies
    • 5.9k views
  3. Lodge Flag 1 2

    • 23 replies
    • 7.5k views
    • 66 replies
    • 13.7k views
  4. Noise At Noac 1 2 3

    • 38 replies
    • 9.2k views
    • 0 replies
    • 3.8k views
    • 4 replies
    • 2.7k views
    • 30 replies
    • 8.4k views
    • 7 replies
    • 2.8k views
    • 29 replies
    • 6k views
  5. OA for adult leader

    • 6 replies
    • 3.3k views
  6. Adult joining OA?

    • 2 replies
    • 2.5k views
    • 15 replies
    • 9.3k views
  • LATEST POSTS

    • Agreed.  But there are some who cannot "get it", even though you explain it ten times.  Also, I do let Scouts use the laser to point out the North Star to me, as a check of whether they have "got it."  I was surprised at how many, for instance, know the method... pointers stars from the Big Dipper , then five times the distance to hit Polaris... but in practice it seems only about 70-80% can do this.  That is, I ask them to tell how to find the North Star, then they explain it, and point in the general direction, but when I give them the laser to show me, they are off by a lot.  This even even after I have them use the two sticks in the ground method of aligning a "gun sight" (so to speak). This also helps tremendously with Astronomy MB, Req 4: (a) Identify in the sky at least 10 constellations, at least four of which are in the zodiac. (b) Identify in the sky at least eight conspicuous stars, five of which are of magnitude 1 or brighter.   For these, I use star charts, drawings, apps, telescopes or binoculars on a tripod, and pictures before pulling out the laser 😜  It is just one of many resources to use...
    • The reason I do not use pointers for astronomy is to provide scouts et al better opportunity to appreciate the greater cosmos, and to become a guide themselves and not simply an audience. Imagine using descriptive language and the stars as pointers as the main guide. The purpose is to have viewers not just see a particular object, but see it within the greater cosmos. Also the joy experienced by a new sky viewer when they finally "find" the stellar object themselves. Sooner or later they then begin to describe to others how to find it. This creates a cycle of not just pointing out specific items, but for the participants to begin looking for other objects and guiding others to them as well.
    • Agree with @qwaze on not just automatically giving the Scout rank badge. For us, the very first campout that the AoL crossovers attend with the troop, they can breeze through "reviewing" all of the Scout requirements and most will have no issue with being ready that night to have their SMC and be awarded the rank on Sunday morning. And that is appropriate. For the small number that struggle with a requirement or two, they are not massive issues and the kid can still have their SMC and get encouraged to come to the meting that week and 99.9% of the time they will receive their award that night. We aren't solving some massive crisis of "holding kids up on advancement" if BSA makes this change.
    • Setting aside that I thought turning Scout into a rank was pointless, now that it is a rank ... We had several AoL crossovers who were still struggling with square knots. That's not to disrespect the program. We had a dozen crossovers, about half of them knew their knots well enough to quickly demonstrate them. I think the pandemic was part of the problem. But, also, it's not in the nature of 10-year-olds to retain those kinds of motor skills. Scouts who are camping every month have greater odds of actually needing those skills. No rubber stamps. It's a good life lesson to know that it's not about the patch. You have to be prepared to actually demonstrate the skills you claim to have.
    • If you see that as the point, then please, follow your beliefs and never go into the woods again.  Also, please stop using electricity, because the windmills are killing far more birds... As for me, until something more conclusive than your concoction emerges from scientific study and observation, I'll happily bring out my laser pointer to educate Scouts. Happy Scouting 
  • Who's Online (See full list)

×
×
  • Create New...