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4CouncilsScouter

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4CouncilsScouter last won the day on March 22 2017

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About 4CouncilsScouter

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    Proud Okie Scouter From Missouri

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  1. 4CouncilsScouter

    Private Council Security Guard

    I was visiting my local Scout Shop today, and I noticed my council now has a security guard. As I was leaving, I saw the guard heckling a volunteer in the lobby about why they were there. I saw another Scouter I knew watching from the other side of the lobby. I asked that Scouter if he knew anything about the new security, and he said he didn't know anything about it. He recalled seeing the guard at the council banquet watching the doors but had no idea otherwise about why we have one. I'll make my opinion clear. I don't think our council has the need or can justify the cost of a security guard. Our Scout Shop and service center are not in a bad part of town. We're next to a decent sized bank and an IT company, and across the street from a gated apartment complex. More importantly though, I can't support a council that has employees, contracted or not, harassing the people who put on their program.
  2. 4CouncilsScouter

    New YPT Launch

    The information I've gotten from my council and ScoutingU says the training should be approximately one hour long. This has to do with some states requiring annual or regular youth protection training for any volunteers in their state who interact with youth or who interact with you in overnight-settings.
  3. 4CouncilsScouter

    Is WFA worth it?

    Hey Brian, The key difference in WFA is that the BSA has worked with the Red Cross and other groups to develop a training for Scouting members that focuses on responding to situations when it's not an 8 minute wait for an ambulance but an 8 hour wait for a helicopter. In short, some of the things you'll you notice in WFA versus basic first aid courses include: A greater emphasis on longer-term care. Techniques for moving individuals long-distances over difficult terrain. How to take into account environmental factors into your treatment plan. Responding to more advanced first aid situations, e.g. High Altitude Pulmonary Edema, childbirth, and/or chest punctures. Using outdoor equipment as resources. I will say this. The BSA just revamped its WFA training a little while ago, so WFA instructors have more latitude into which aspects of WFA they would like to focus on, e.g. a WFA instructor leading a course for Sea Base crew leaders can focus more on lighting, submersion incidents, and heat problems. Hope this helps!
  4. 4CouncilsScouter

    National Camp School Patch

    @Eagle94-A1, that's kinda of where I'm at patch-wise. Playing devil's advocate though, the Chaplain/Camp Commissioner training is listed in the National Camp School brochure and trainings' syllabi are posted only on NCS's website. I'd be curious to see what our council camping chair has to say or area NCAP chair has to say.
  5. 4CouncilsScouter

    National Camp School Patch

    The reason I ask specifically is that NCS training for camp commissioners and chaplains is no longer done at at national/regional level. They passed it on down to councils to put on. I'm not sure whether to order NCS patches for our chaplain and camp commissioners once they do their training though. On a side note @Eagle94-A1, our council has budgeted for NCS for their year. They just like for their individuals to "put down the deposit so you're committed". I don't see the harm in paying $50 out-of-pocket when the council will pay for the rest (easily several hundred more), and I know at our summer camp that they'll reimburse the staff members if they stay on for the full summer.
  6. 4CouncilsScouter

    National Camp School Patch

    I have a National Camp School (NCS) and uniforming question for those with a little more background in this than me. The other day, our council's camping director asked me to come on as our Cub Scout resident camp program director, perks of being retired and having more time I guess . I put down my deposit to go to NCS for Program Director training and began recruiting staff for this summer. Here's my question: should chaplains and camp commissioners wear the NCS emblem even though they now go through council-delivered training for their positions?
  7. 4CouncilsScouter

    OA to end AoL ceremonies?

    From what I understand, there is some grounds to this rumor. I have it in good faith from a fellow Scouter serving on one of the national OA subcommittees that this has in fact been discussed. He cited concerns over 1) changing public opinion about the OA's usage of American Indian elements, and 2) the use of American Indian culture in Cub Scouting and Boy Scouting advancement has some OA leadership concerned about the OA being "grouped in" if a pack or troop uses AIA in poor taste. I suspect that this was brought up at the OA National Planning Meeting that happened this December, and I suspect either a decision will be announced or more input will be solicited in August at NOAC 2018.
  8. 4CouncilsScouter

    To Report or Not Report YPT Violation

    @T2Eagle I'd say you'd have two routes here: Route One: Complete Form 680-676 and submit it to your district executive or Scout executive. Route Two: Notify your district executive that an adult leader broke YPT separate accommodations for Scouts and Scouters policy, and explain to them exactly what happened. Let them know that you'll be working with the adult leader in question and refreshing him on YPT policies. If you suspect any inappropriate behavior or abuse occurred, immediately report it to your Scout executive or council office. Additionally, you may be required by your state to report any inappropriate behavior or abuse to law enforcement or other agencies. If this is case, Route Two is not appropriate.
  9. 4CouncilsScouter

    District Assistant Position

    I know with the last round of Federal labor law changes we saw some changes to what professional Scouters can serve a district, e.g. the district associate position being added as a non-exempt alternative to the traditional district executive position. However, did anyone hear anything about a new position called a district assistant? I stopped by my council service center today and noticed they were clearing out a couple old offices that had been used as storage for a while now. I asked my DE about what the was reasoning for the early-spring cleaning, and he said the council was planning on hiring two to three district assistants to basically perform the office functions of all unit-serving professionals. He said the goal was push all district executives and field directors out into the communities more. They're supposedly going to be part-time jobs in our council. I'm honestly in favor of this change, but I'm curious if anyone else has seen this position in practice. Anyone have any experiences to share?
  10. 4CouncilsScouter

    Council too tightly managing communication - Venting

    I thought we moved past this is in 2015... A male leader, irregardless of their sexual orientation, counts as a male.
  11. 4CouncilsScouter

    Verifying if a Scouter is in good standing?

    Hey @Snow Owl, the BSA has four main mechanisms for verifying if a volunteer is eligible to work with youth. Each Scouter is required to undergo a background check as a part of their application. Your council service center and its professional staff are responsible for filtering out volunteers whose background checks come back with offenses. Your Scout executive or their designee should contact your unit's leadership if anything comes back beyond, say, a parking ticket. Each adult application requires references be checked. For unit-level Scouters, this should be done by the unit committee. For council/district Scouters, this should be done by the Scout Executive or designee. Each adult application is cross-referenced to a database maintained by the National Council known as the Ineligible Volunteer (IV) files. If a volunteer is included on that database, they are automatically disqualified from serving in any volunteer-capacity. At the unit-level, each Chartered Organization Representative (COR) has the authority to disapprove an adult application with almost any impunity, especially if they know there are significant impediments to that volunteer's ability to work with youth. For council/district Scouters, the Scout executive or their designee may also do the same. [Sidenote: there are exceptions to disapproving an adult application, but they mainly relate to the Declaration of Religious Principle and the BSA's 2013/2015 membership decisions].
  12. 4CouncilsScouter

    Summit Seasonal Staff

    At my crew’s last meeting, several Venturers expressed interest at working at the Summit after hearing our crew’s VP talk about her Jambo experience. I worked at Philmont during my college years but for obvious reasons never worked at the SBR . I can imagine some aspects of camp staff life are pretty universal, but I know each camp has its own flairs too. Does anyone have any insight into working as a part of the Summit’s seasonal staff that I can share with any of these interested Venturers?
  13. 4CouncilsScouter

    BSA Hammock Rules

    @CalicoPenn Maybe I'm misunderstanding you, but I don't believe anyone ever claimed to have created this on their own accord. This came from the Health and Safety team at the National Service Center. It's a BSA document and can be found on multiple, official BSA sites. Moreover, given the imperative mood used, I'd consider it to be hard and fast policies from these "safety points... taken into consideration": Never attach a hammock to any object that could move, such as vehicle bumpers or trailers. Never “stack” hammocks one above another. Do not hang a hammock above water, including at a waterfront, lake, river, or stream. Never swing or stand in a hammock. Falls from hammocks can cause serious or fatal injuries. Do not use a hammock that has frayed or damaged ropes. Use only the manufacturer’s replacement ropes. Do not put more weight into a hammock than recommended by the manufacturer. If these were suggestions, we'd see less commanding verbiage used. In any case, the majority of these "safety points" are stuff responsible hammock users have been doing for years.
  14. 4CouncilsScouter

    BSA Hammock Rules

    @CalicoPenn Semantics aside, we have a responsibility as Scouters and volunteers in this organization to adhere to established program policies/rules/guidelines. The purpose of BSA Health and Safety Alerts and BSA Safety Moments are to call attention to situations to which there is a present or probable situation in which members could be harmed. They're used to keep our youth safe and enable their leaders to make sound decisions based on the collective experiences/research of volunteers across the country. They're not issued for "blueberry pancakes" preferences.
  15. 4CouncilsScouter

    BSA Hammock Rules

    I'm guessing they're assuming that "Hang hammocks in secure locations" is sufficient for making sure you have a sturdy enough tree; but, they do mention "If you are using solid, living trees, special care should be taken not to damage the outer bark."
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