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  • LATEST POSTS

    • Actually its  up to the Council at this point. 
    • Do you charge them the same dues (assuming your pack has dues)?
    • It may sound that way, but is definitely not. A voting member of the council is one who votes for the board member slate of candidates, not a member of the board. Time to time the council voting members have to vote to sell a camp or something that the board wants to put “to the people”.  
    • According to this https://filestore.scouting.org/filestore/pdf/511-421(16)_WEB.pdf  CORs "Represent your organization on the council and district levels."   According to this: https://troopleader.scouting.org/chartered-organization-representative/   "The chartered organization representative may become a member of the district committee and is a voting member of the council."   Sounds like they are on the council board to me.
    • Council Executive Boards and Council Executive Committees (subcommittees of the Executive Board consisting of the principal officers) meet in private with members only, plus special guests who make presentations on pending topics.  CORs belong to the Council, which meets to elect the Executive Board during the annual business meetings. Including numbers of non-members in Executive Board or Executive Committee meetings is disfavored due to confidentiality issues.  Non-members attending would not be bound to confidentiality and would further expect to express viewpoints and arguments.  Well-run boards develop effective ways to gather opinion from the CORs and other stakeholders and respect those opinions. The “Owasippe” incident is a good example of when a board did not adequately solicit and take into account the views of its constituency when dealing with property matters – in this case the attempted sale of a huge property with minimal notice.  The story is immensely complex and would take hours of blogging to explain.  The bottom line is that the attempted sale was blocked through litigation and zoning moves which greatly reduced the desirability of the property to potential purchasers.  Another bottom line is that the inadvisable board moves caused years of deformed relations among council volunteers, professionals and supporters.  It can be said that bitter feelings created during the incident was a contributing factor in the overall downturn of the Chicago Area Council, which eventually lost its national charter and was merged with three other councils into the Chicagoland  "Pathway to Adventure Council".   Interestingly, Owasippe Scout Reservation is now in the best physical, program and financial shape it has been in for decades.  As the bankruptcy causes the sell-off of many other properties, this massive and well-run operation is easily absorbing the demand of Troops from across the Midwest.   
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