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69RoadRunner

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69RoadRunner last won the day on August 16

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About 69RoadRunner

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    Senior Member

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Virginia
  • Occupation
    Programmer
  • Interests
    Backpacking, cooking
  • Biography
    Scoutmaster

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  1. I'm thinking a scout can cook a meal but not have other scouts eat it. We were talking about this for some requirements tonight.
  2. What are some activity ideas your troops like to do while camping and make sense during Covid? We'll be car camping soon at a place where we can drop some stuff off, but have to park a mile away. We won't be bringing our trailer, so we need to keep things relatively compact. Manhunt and capture the flag are 2 they like. We'll do some hiking, but I want to give some new ideas to the PLC for them to consider. Thanks!
  3. This is an extremely rare encounter. Cougars avoid humans. You could frequently hike that area and not see one in 10 years. The presence of the kittens is the only reason he saw the cougar. People safely hike alone in bear/cougar territory all the time. Look at the people who thru-hike the AT, PCT and CDT. Most go solo. Might want to wait for the hands to stop shaking before wiping or you'll just create a bigger mess.😲
  4. Don't approach the murder kitten like this guy did. Note that her kittens were nearby which puts her in defensive mode. Get big, get loud, don't run away. You can't out run it and running away puts the cougar in predator mode. DO NOT BEND DOWN! Note when this guy bends down the cougar charges. It makes you look small. Find a branch or something you can grab and throw without bending down. He eventually threw rocks and the cougar ran off. If you have trekking poles, water bottles, etc. throw them. Put the damn phone away so you have both hands free.
  5. We did the big sailboat with Sea Base a few years ago with 20 people. I was seasick for 2 days. Several others were, too. to varying degrees and the sea wasn't that choppy. If you have motion sickness issues, don't go. Next summer we're doing the out island adventure with Sea Base in large part because of that. Our captain was a bit of an obnoxious drill sergeant type. The snorkeling was a lot of fun. The day in Key West was nice. It rained every night, so we couldn't sleep on deck. 20 people crammed down below was hot and stinky. One night the captain ran the generator and a/c. If everyone in your crew enjoys sailing, go for it. Just understand what you're getting into.
  6. I'm so old, I can remember when this was about adult family members being one to one with child family members.
  7. I agree. Ambiguous rules or not, BSA cannot tell immediate family members that they can't be one to one.
  8. I hope the article was educational and people will at least consider their options in the wilderness. The points Skurka makes are valid in my limited experience. Options vary based on location and most people are bad at hanging bear bags. We rented a cabin in Lost River State Park (family, not scouting). They had trash cans for the cabin that were supposed to be bearproof. They were heavy duty plastic and the lid screwed on. One evening, we heard a noise. We looked out the back door and watched a black bear unscrew the lid to get himself a meal (and make a mess for us). They now have metal bearproof storage containers that actually work.
  9. True, but he explains the circumstances are specific for when he sleeps with his food.
  10. This isn't directed at Eagledad or DuctTape, but just a general comment. As Skurka points out, just because your bear bags were safe in the morning does not mean your hang was a good one. Unless a bear actually attempts to get the bags, you don't know.
  11. In the article, Skurka does a good job explaining different techniques for different circumstances.
  12. While at Northern Tier, most of our campsites did not have any tree that allowed for a proper bear bag hang. At our 1 trip to Philmont, since we weren't in Valle Vidal, they of course have cables set up so you can do it right. Quite often, either the right tree doesn't exist or people do it wrong. Luck prevents a bear from getting an easy meal, but could lead to the bear having to be killed. Here's a good article by a backpacking expert on the subject. We probably should reconsider hanging bear bags unless we're certain there is a proper bear bag hanging tree available. One of the biggest hurdles is scouters tend to be the people most resistant to change that I encounter. https://andrewskurka.com/argument-against-hanging-bear-bag/
  13. To help out my wife and daughter, I just had to pledge to be a sister to all Girl Scouts.
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