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Patch Trading Central

Have a patch or memorabilia you're looking to swap? Use this virtual patch trading blanket. (This area is intended to facilitate memorabilia swapping, not necessarily commerce.)

375 topics in this forum

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  1. Chaplains Patch

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  2. patch companies

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  3. ghost csp

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  4. New CSP

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  • LATEST POSTS

    • I never liked the Improved Scouting Program (ISP) – particularly berets & belt loops – and it was not an improvement, but I’ve always thought it receives an excessive amount of ‘blame’. Like other replies:  My memory of my urban Troop in the early 70’s and all the other Troops I knew thru District events, OA Lodge, summer camp staff, etc…  boys elected Patrol Leaders, planned menus and duty rosters, learned first aid, went camping just as often as pre ISP…  in short…  all the Scouting essentials.  ISP meant new patches and don't have to learn semaphore! From the late 60’s & early 70’s membership in other Scout organizations like Scouts Canada and Girl Scouts of America has also declined. I recall reading that participation in adult organizations like civic, fraternal and service clubs has also declined during the last 40 – 50 years. The larger societal issues contributed to the BSA decline much more then the ISP.  Explanations such as working parents, after school activities, etc have been discussed ad nausea. As an urban District person in the early 80’s and with no data to support my position… Many parents were not available and not many after school activities, but the top reason(s) for decline:  Fewer Organizations & their Heads’ will support a Unit and extreme difficulty recruiting qualified Unit Leaders.   Anecdotally in my District it seemed that thru the early/mid 80’s many of those who kept Scouting going were young adult former Scouts who stayed with the Troop, Lodge, etc during college or job and became post college Scouters.  But gradually many more went ‘away’ after high school and lost the Scouting connection.  Is this just me or do other members recall similar circumstances?
    • That was quick. It appears fixed.  Thanks, RS
    • My dad and uncles Troop was like your troop. They accepted the new requirements, but otherwise just kept doing their usual outdoor program. 
    • Since the weekend, new member accounts are not being created as the confirmation email is not being sent to new members. Could the admins have a look? Thanks, RS
    • Jameson76 - In our community in 1976, there were six very active Scouting units. Five years later, all but one had ended. The new Scouting program was a disaster for the Boy Scouting program overall and helped to bring the Golden Age of Scouting to a close.  There were elements that worked well in our troop such as the Leadership Corps and the skill awards but honestly, we just continued a very strong and active outdoor program. Trips to the National Jamboree, Washington DC and Chicago helped.  And we saw significant growth from a combination of transfers and new Scouts.  
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