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  2. mrkstvns

    Loveland Castle, Chateau Larouche (OH)

    That sounds completely amazing. I just love hearing about people who think outside the box and let their dreams guide their actions. There is a somewhat similar story around these parts of a guy who owns a bakery in the town of Bellville, Texas. He visited castles in Europe and decided that he needed to build himself one too. The result is Newman's Castle which is open for tours to those who patronize his bakery... http://newmanscastle.com/
  3. qwazse

    Memorial Day

    Our troop coordinates the district in placing flags at a large cemetery. Looks like we'll be working around some storms tonight.
  4. The basics of all these skills are taught to new adult leaders in the IOLS (Introduction to Outdoor Leadership Skills) course. This is required for Scoutmasters and Assistant Scoutmasters in order to be considered "trained" for their position. Scoutmasters and the more dedicated/hardcore ASMs tend to pursue additional training as they grow into their roles. That might include Wood Badge, or it might take the form of specific skills that enable them to lead or do more within scouting (like taking Wilderness First Aid courses so that they can lead crews at high adventure bases). Parents of new scouts generally do not know much about camping, and few could tie knots, demonstrate map and compass skills, or do the basic first aid tasks that a young scout is asked to demonstrate. But parents can learn and have fun doing it. Like my dad used to say, "You can always teach an old dog a new trick."
  5. Sounds like you'd create a more relevant, challenging program. In addition to incorporating more Orienteering and Wilderness Survival skills, I'd include the "challenging" requirements from Pioneering MB. Using lashings to make something really COOL would be challinging and a practical demonstration of using kntos and lashings. (Besides, who doesn't want to try out a monkey bridge??) I also think that skills in handling watercraft are useful and relevant. Maybe sailing, or maybe kayaking or canoeing. Basic river rescue skills could also be useful. Swimming skills at the level that they could save a life would be nice: complete BSA Lifeguard, or complete BSA Aquatics Supervision: Swimming and Water Rescue (or similarly challenging course, such as Red Cross or YMCA lifeguard certifications). I think it would also be useful to challenge scouts to master some subset of skills to the level they can teach it, for example, get a Red Cross CPR instructor certificate, or become a Leave No Trace trainer, or complete the USA Archery instructor course. (Not just go through the motions using EDGE, but actually be able to teach a skill "for real").
  6. jr56

    Hornaday Award????

    This was back in 2000. Has probably changed since then.
  7. Today
  8. RememberSchiff

    Not Quite Prepared for Philmont

    Insoles help me. I wear Sole Reds now. I previously wore Superfeet Green which are popular. I had to experiment which gets expensive though less than a $400 custom orthopedic insert. This link will give you an idea of different brands. I have not bought from this online store. I buy Soles from local shoe store and Superfeet from REI. https://www.theinsolestore.com/backpacking-hiking-boot-insoles.html?foot_conditions=396
  9. Do parents today (your future leader pool) have the ability to teach these skills? Asking for a friend.
  10. fred8033

    BSA patrol method is lost in the fog

    Maybe. My interpretation is they learn faster, they learn better and create more memories. Too many leaders jump on mixed age patrols as an excuse for not trusting the scouts after failed mentoring. You can embed the older scout expertise into the patrol, but it comes at horrible consequences. Leadership of peers is not earned or learned. Real patrol elections are subverted (will go to the oldest boy 16 years old versus 11 years old). Decisions often can be done by intimidation or bowling over the younger scouts. Patrol pride is subverted as patrols change over time. IMHO, my a scout can change patrols at any time but my "ideal" is a scout's patrol works well together, wanting to do similar things and stays together for 6/7+ years. Patrol identify is subverted as patrols are not doing similar things. Yes, they may cook together or plan together. But ... Few can share a tent together. IMHO, tent sharing across patrols is one of the biggest ways to subvert the patrol method. Individual scouts are constantly breaking off. To go hang with their buddies. To do basic learning at summer camp. To go on higher activities. Bad habits and bad behavior is past on. Conversational topics of 15/16/17 year olds is very different than 11/12 year olds. Pals can often call each other on bad behavior or know how to ignore it. 11/12 year olds will mimic to get on the good side of the older scout. I think we can easily and justifiably debate this back and forth. My issue is less the debate. My issue is BSA had a fairly consistent story over time. The latest leader guide reflects that BSA is giving up on teaching patrol method. Instead, BSA is saying patrol method is critical and we should go figure it out.
  11. mrkstvns

    First Class 1a - Troop Activities

    A few things that might be considered as counting towards 1C requirement 1a (troop/patrol activities): troop campouts patrol day hike (5-mile hike, orienteering course, 10-mile hike, etc., even if it also counts towards other rank/advancement requirements) participation in district/council activities (if done as a troop/patrol group), for example, Scout Fair, helping at Pushcart or Webelos campouts helping fellow scouts on Eagle project helping fellow scouts on Hornaday project participating in other troop/patrol service project (for example, helping senior citizens weatherize houses) participating in Merit Badge midway event (if done as troop/patrol group, but not if done individually) participating with troop in Scouting for Food drives participating with troop/patrol in Scout Sunday activities participating with troop/patrol in unit fundraising activities, e.g., bake sale or car wash As long as it's something that was done within the scouting program as a troop or patrol group (and not as an individual), I think it's fair to let a scout count it as an "activity". I'm not inclined to let a scout who is a Den Chief count activities done by the den or pack towards this requirement....
  12. Eagledad

    BSA patrol method is lost in the fog

    I think you just pointed out the failure. Same age patrols are a contradiction of patrol method because continued scout growth requires outside intervention from an experienced resources. Not that mixed age is the only method, it’s just preferred for growth relying on the patrol members. Many SMs used a same age patrol style because it fit their leadership style and goals best. But the troop structure requires some considerations to have success with same age patrols. i think it’s easier for a same age SM to work within the older traditional SM handbook than a mixed age SM working with the same age program. I’m speaking from the experience of working both sides. Barry
  13. qwazse

    Not Quite Prepared for Philmont

    There's nothing like burning through the calories in a morning to solve picky eaters. But the nice thing about Philmont is exchanges. There are locations to drop off what you don't like and pick up something some other crew doesn't like. Plus, it's likely to make trades mid trail. Evidently my venturers despised green beans, but they kept crossing paths with a contingent from Tennessee who couldn't live without them. Those exchanges solved a lot of problems. P.S. - I've never been to this HA base myself, I merely conditioned with my crew for everyone's mutual benefit. My venturers and leaders who did go were pretty thorough with the after-action review. In fact they were half the reason I had a crew. Some went while scouts and came back wanting to return so they could "do it right."
  14. MikeS72

    First Women

    Correct! Both of these young ladies are part of a Venture Crew, and were already very active in the council, both with their crew and at the council camp.
  15. fred8033

    BSA patrol method is lost in the fog

    I fear we read different things into the quotes of Baden Powell and Hillcourt and others. I fear BSA's definition of patrol has been mucked up by poor wording choices. I prefer the 1950s boy scout handbook (page 88): "The Scout patrol is the finest boys' gang in all the world. The patrol is the unit that makes Scouting go. It is a group of boys, usually six to eight, who pal together because they like to do the same things." ... I thought Hillcourt (or another author quoted with Hillcourt) wrote as a gang of friends who wanted to hang together and do things together. Where you say "new scout (same age patrol) experiment failed", I don't see it ... but I won't argue. Troops fail with it often, but it often seems a reflection of the unit vision than the idea. My issue is with troop positions such as troop guide and instructor and ASPLs there to help coach the PLs. It seems like BSA's documentation just does not line up. If suggesting mixed age, then troop guide and instructors have little work. If new scout patrol, then there is a strong need for troop guides, instructors and mentoring of new scout patrol PLs. I just don't see a vision promoted from BSA on how to make all of this work and I think it's to the detriment of the scouts.
  16. mrkstvns

    First Women

    Thanks, Hawkwin! It slipped my mind that girls could have been active as Venturers or Sea Scouts. Appreciate the reminder!
  17. mrkstvns

    Hornaday Award????

    Really?!?! That doesn't jibe with the info I see on scouting.org, which says: "The Hornaday Awards Committee meets three or four times a year. Therefore, applicants must recognize the lead time involved." See: https://www.scouting.org/awards/hornaday-awards/judging/
  18. Hawkwin

    First Women

    https://oa-bsa.org/article/2018-membership-update
  19. mrkstvns

    First Women

    That's too bad because it means the local lodge is likely ignoring or skirting the rules for OA membership. How does someone who has only been eligible for membership in BSA suddenly achieve 15 nights of camping with 1 long-term (5 night) camp? Don't get me wrong, I'm all for girls in BSA, but I'd be a lot happier if they actually earned their accolades instead of getting there by exception or fiat. These "firsties" devalue the honor that so many scouts have legitimately earned.
  20. HelpfulTracks

    Memorial Day

    Flags at the veterans cemeteries
  21. mrkstvns

    Memorial Day

    This coming weekend is Memorial Day. For many scouting families, it marks the winding down of the school year and the beginning of the summer vacation season. Swimming pools are open for business and college students are back home for a respite. Memorial Day means so much more though. It's a time to remember America's fallen soldiers, and many scout troops will mark the occasion with flag service events at local veterans cemeteries, battlefields, or other military landmarks. Does your troop do something special for Memorial Day?
  22. FireStone

    Why are Cub Scout uniforms and universal clothing items?

    We made universal neckerchiefs and paracord slides for our Pack. I know that's not officially allowed, but whatever, we got tired of the nickel-and-dime routine too. Our neckers are really sharp, with a custom embroidered patch on them. Cost $12 but last all throughout their Cub years. It is ridiculous. Why on earth there are 3 different belt buckles is beyond me. It really is set up to just sell us more stuff. Not at all thrifty.
  23. 69RoadRunner

    Not Quite Prepared for Philmont

    I will be taking plenty of Vitamin I to deal with any pain. Also Turmeric pills for inflammation. For the IT band, when I had it, the pain was usually gone the next morning. Of course additional downhill would bring it back. We travel in Class As, so the scouts are used to that. I foresee some issues with some of these scouts. A couple of pick eaters, some who tend to let others do the work, etc. Having the duty roster in place ahead of time will be a big help, I hope. One scout has diabetes. His dad is going along. I'm not worried about him at all. He plays rugby and is a leader. Perhaps a bit too much at times, but when you're the oldest of 4 boys, that comes with the territory. 😀 He's a good kid. We also have 1 scout from another troop that I don't know. He's known very well by my other adult leader and there is no chance this kid would be coming if he wasn't a great kid.
  24. Eagledad

    Not Quite Prepared for Philmont

    14 year old is an awkward age. We took two crews one year, one was made of 14 year olds, the other was made of 15 to 18 year olds. The 18 years olds were new ASMs (and they had a blast). Anyway, the 14 year olds stuck to themselves. They didn't like wearing the uniform during travel (required), while the older scouts didn't think twice about it. They just never seemed comfortable. As I said, awkward. But they were fine on the trail. That is where they bonded. I will suggest that you go again with this group in a couple of years. Treks with 16 and 17 year olds is so much fun. They are more relaxed and just know how to have a good time. Barry
  25. scotteg83

    Why are Cub Scout uniforms and universal clothing items?

    For our pack, and my kids when they were in it, We recommend the blue shirt, but if they want a belt, we tell them to get the cub scout belt bucket (not the rank ones). And i have yet to have a scout in the last 8 years buy the socks. Alot of our dens make custom slides instead using the metal ones. As a pack, in the "bridging up" ceremony, our pack provided them with the next seasons necker and slide. Personally, I like the different colors each year, helps separate the different dens on group outings and pack meetings, but unless you have 50+ kids, its probably not needed.
  26. Jameson76

    Not Quite Prepared for Philmont

    Naproxen is your friend. Naproxen is prescribed for the treatment of mild to moderate pain and inflammation. Take at night, you will wake up with somewhat less inflammation and tension from the plantar fasciitis and other aches and pains. Don't fear the better living through chemistry option
  27. Eagledad

    Adult led and youth led

    Looking back, I can't recall very many scouts reflecting the leadership of their parents. Visa versa, some of our scouts also weren't a reflection of their really good leader parents. But, in most cases, the sons were remarkable reflections of their parents' character. Without getting into natural leadership (a whole different breed of leader), leadership skills have to be acquired one way or another. But what exactly is leadership? We push servant leadership in the scouting program, but what is servant leadership? I look back at two groups of recognized leaders in our troop that we guided to be servant leaders. I learned of the first group by a young proud freshmen scout one night at a troop meeting. We have three large high schools that feed our troop. One of those schools hands ballets to all 2000 of the students and ask them to pick the top 8 leaders of the school. Seven of the chosen leaders were scouts in our troop. The eight was a girl. I'm she would have been in our troop today.😎 So, how do high schoolers define leaders. Well, each of these scouts were active campers and experts with outdoors skills. Each had a reputation of trust and kindness toward all the scouts. Each were fairly quiet scouts, but more in the of a calm confidence, they weren't shy. They weren't braggarts, I never heard a single one of them mention their honor. Only the proud freshmen alerted me. They weren't silly, but more steady in their character. In my youth, these guys were top candidates for OA Arrowmen. Servants. At the same time, neither were they our top leaders. They all were good trusted leaders while on the PLC, but they weren't making a career of taking Positions of responsibility. They were scouts for adventure and the camaraderie of the patrol. I was quite proud, but not surprised. They were solid scouts. I learned of our other group of leaders one night when the district OA representative came to visit. We chatted for a while, but eventually I asked why his visit. He confessed that he wanted to see the program of the districts best youth leaders. His words. He said that scouts from our troop were well trained in running a large program. They we confident and skilled at setting goals and developing agendas to meet those goals. Our scouts were so accomplished with these skills, the scouts from the other troops elected them because they were intimidated. And it wasn't the same scouts, different scouts were elected each of the previous three years. I was to busy for OA, and frankly it wasn't the program of my youth, so I wasn't involved at all. so, I had no idea our scouts were so respected. Three of the 7 scouts scouts elected as leaders by their high school were also arrowmen, but none of them were the scouts the district rep was talking about. The scouts that where being elected leaders OA were had a differnt style than the scouts elected by their school. These had also been SPLs, ASPLS and Troop Quartermasters of our troop. These three positions are in our troop are very challenging and usually only taken on by the scouts who want and enjoy Positions of Responsibility. These guys also typically had the highest grades in school. As I said, we push servant leadership. Are they typical of servant leadership? I could go on and on, and on and on, bragging about our youth leaders, but these are two groups of leaders recognized outside of our troop. We weren't doing the bragging. Complete strangers were going out of their way to call them "Leader". They were recognized for their qualities. And yet, they were two completely different types of qualities. Are these qualities leadership qualities? More important to me, are their qualities the qualities of servants? My definition of servant leader is simply putting everyone else first, before ourselves. You know, the Scout Oath. That is all that we asked of all our scouts, leader or not. A servant leaders is just a by-product of a servant lifestyle. Quite frankly, I believe being a good servant is harder for followers than leaders. Leaders have one task of taking the Patrol to their goals. Followers have to question and trust the leader the whole way. Much much harder. So I find myself in leadership discussions always spread around the subject because I have witness so many good leaders of different styles. And this isn't just my opinion, this is the opinion of strangers out in the community. Their leadership styles are as diverse as the stars. I was the council Youth Leadership director, the head guy for Junior Leadership Training for all the council. I was the expert. And yet, all I can say that the one commonality for developing good leaders is let them make decisions based from character actions of being a servant. Or, follow the scout law. Teach you scouts to serve, and no matter their skills, I learned that they will be respected as "Leaders". This really is an amazing program. I love this scouting stuff. Barry
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  • Posts

    • That sounds completely amazing.  I just love hearing about people who think outside the box and let their dreams guide their actions. There is a somewhat similar story around these parts of a guy who owns a bakery in the town of Bellville, Texas.  He visited castles in Europe and decided that he needed to build himself one too.  The result is Newman's Castle which is open for tours to those who patronize his bakery... http://newmanscastle.com/
    • Our troop coordinates the district in placing flags at a large cemetery. Looks like we'll be working around some storms tonight.
    • The basics of all these skills are taught to new adult leaders in the IOLS (Introduction to Outdoor Leadership Skills) course.  This is required for Scoutmasters and Assistant Scoutmasters in order to be considered "trained" for their position. Scoutmasters and the more dedicated/hardcore ASMs tend to pursue additional training as they grow into their roles. That might include Wood Badge, or it might take the form of specific skills that enable them to lead or do more within scouting (like taking Wilderness First Aid courses so that they can lead crews at high adventure bases). Parents of new scouts generally do not know much about camping, and few could tie knots, demonstrate map and compass skills, or do the basic first aid tasks that a young scout is asked to demonstrate.  But parents can learn and have fun doing it.  Like my dad used to say, "You can always teach an old dog a new trick."
    • Sounds like you'd create a more relevant, challenging program. In addition to incorporating more Orienteering and Wilderness Survival skills, I'd include the "challenging" requirements from Pioneering MB.  Using lashings to make something really COOL would be challinging and a practical demonstration of using kntos and lashings.  (Besides, who doesn't want to try out a monkey bridge??) I also think that skills in handling watercraft are useful and relevant.  Maybe sailing, or maybe kayaking or canoeing.   Basic river rescue skills could also be useful.   Swimming skills at the level that they could save a life would be nice:  complete BSA Lifeguard, or complete BSA Aquatics Supervision: Swimming and Water Rescue (or similarly challenging course, such as Red Cross or YMCA lifeguard certifications). I think it would also be useful to challenge scouts to master some subset of skills to the level they can teach it, for example, get a Red Cross CPR instructor certificate, or become a Leave No Trace trainer, or complete the USA Archery instructor course.  (Not just go through the motions using EDGE, but actually be able to teach a skill "for real").
    • This was back in 2000.  Has probably changed since then.
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