Jump to content

RichardB

Members
  • Content Count

    299
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    4

RichardB last won the day on May 20 2017

RichardB had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

109 Excellent

About RichardB

  • Rank
    Member

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Not Telling
  • Location
    TX, USA

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. RichardB

    Privacy of Health Forms

    As the OP weaves its way along it might be good to review the first FAQ on why BSA has an Annual Health and Medical Record some but not all that have been batted back and forth. Q. Why does the BSA require all participants to have an Annual Health and Medical Record? A. The AMHR serves many purposes. Completing a health history promotes health awareness, collects necessary data, and provides medical professionals critical information needed to treat a patient in the event of an illness or injury. It also provides emergency contact information. Poor health and/or lack of awareness of risk factors have led to disabling injuries, illnesses, and even fatalities. Because we care about our participants’ health and safety, the Boy Scouts of America has produced and required use of standardized annual health and medical information since at least the 1930s. The medical record is used to prepare for high-adventure activities and increased physical activity. In some cases, it is used to review participants’ readiness for gatherings like the national Scout jamboree and other specialized activities. Because many states regulate the camping industry, the Annual Health and Medical Record also serves as a tool that enables councils to operate day and resident camps and adhere to BSA and state requirements. The Boys Scouts of America’s Annual Health and Medical Record provides a standardized mechanism that can be used by members in all 50 states. RichardB
  2. RichardB

    Privacy of Health Forms

    @ParkMan - that was done about 5 years ago when we updated the FAQ's. What do you think isn't clear or needs to be added? I'll just copy and paste into the thread. Here is the link: https://www.scouting.org/health-and-safety/ahmr/medical-formfaqs/ Q. What do leaders do with the Annual Health and Medical Records they collect? A. In all cases, the information gathered is for use in conducting a safe Scouting program. Information gathered in the AHMR must be maintained and shared in a confidential and discreet manner. Some conditions may require communication to ensure the safety of participants. This information should only be shared on a “need-to-know” basis. Following are some of the best practices for using and storing the records: The Annual Health and Medical Record is secured to maintain the confidentiality of the information, yet at the same time, the forms should be accessible by adult leaders in an emergency. The following guidance will assist leaders in achieving this goal: Leaders are encouraged to maintain the original AHMR forms in a safe location in a binder or file that protects the documents entrusted to the unit leader. The AHMR should be taken on all activities. Designate a leader to keep the files containing the AHMR up to date. This may include reminding participants to update the AHMR annually or as needed. Designate a leader as the point of contact with event or camp health officers. If needed, the leader should arrange to have the AHMR returned to him or her at the end of the event, if allowed by the state. The unit leader (or his or her designee) is responsible for destroying or returning to the participant (or parent and/or guardian) the AHMR documents when the participant leaves the unit or when the documents become outdated. Records are NOT to be digitized, scanned, sent by email, or stored electronically by unit leaders. To streamline a summer or winter camp check-in, records of all participants are reviewed to make sure they are up to date, completed, and signed before leaving for camp. Be sure to check with the camp for any additional information that may be needed. For example, specific immunization records may be required in some states. Prepared leaders use the AHMR in the following ways: Review each participant’s health history. This aids the leader in becoming knowledgeable about the medical conditions of adults and youth members in the unit. Review any treatment plans that may exist with participants and/or parents of youth. Examples might include plans for asthma, food or other allergies, anaphylaxis treatment, behavior, hypertension, and other health risks and medical restrictions that may require accommodations. Knowledge of a participant’s use of an inhaler would allow the leader to prompt the youth to bring it on an overnight camping trip. Be knowledgeable of a participant’s restrictions. This may allow the leader to find ways to extend the Scouting program to those with restrictions while also protecting others and providing a positive and safe experience for everyone. The leader may be able to plan alternate activities (within Youth Protection guidelines) for those youth members who are unable to participate in a long hike or a swimming event. Assist leaders to better coordinate ongoing medical care, such as administration of medications or bandage changes, with parents or other authorized and trained leaders in the unit who agree to assist the participant. This kind of assistance is especially necessary during events lasting longer than 72 hours when a parent or guardian may not be present and the youth member must take regularly scheduled medication.
  3. RichardB

    BSA definition of the Patrol Method

    Hey @Eagledad what book is this in and what page is it on? "For example, our troop lived by the 300 feet separation guideline between patrols and adults." Just asking as I don't see that as a guideline in the Scouts BSA handbook on page 25-26. Is it somewhere else? @TAHAWK quite a bit of information about the patrol or the patrol method in the Scouts BSA handbook or the older Boy Scout handbook 13th edition if you don't have the Scouts BSA one yet. The index will get you to the citations quickly.
  4. RichardB

    Youth Protection Clarification Question

    The OP is about a meeting. Not a youth attending a MB counseling session or a sale. Two deep is not new, the second adult is now required to be 21 vs. 18 and a registered leader. It is the path forward.
  5. RichardB

    Privacy of Health Forms

    Said FAQ's address the OP. BTW, the application also has furnishing the AHMR to unit leadership.......
  6. RichardB

    Youth Protection Clarification Question

    Not sure how this can be misinterpreted (it was announced in May 2018 and went into effect 10/1/18) Source: https://www.scouting.org/health-and-safety/gss/gss01/#a Adult Supervision Two registered adult leaders 21 years of age or over are required at all Scouting activities, including meetings. There must be a registered female adult leader 21 years of age or over in every unit serving females. A registered female adult leader 21 years of age or over must be present for any activity involving female youth. Notwithstanding the minimum leader requirements, age- and program-appropriate supervision must always be provided. (Youth Protection and Barriers to Abuse FAQs)
  7. RichardB

    Wilderness First Aid Pin

    So, you all do understand that the Wilderness First Aid courses come in a variety of flavors, content, etc? If certification is required (for a BSA program), the certificate from a recognized course is what matters. https://www.scouting.org/health-and-safety/training/wilderness-fa/ For any of you who chose to produce bling using images of the BSA, please use an approved vendor and not miss appropriate the brand or logos of other organizations. RichardB
  8. RichardB

    Wilderness First Aid Pin

    Any bling such as this would be locally sourced and made up as you go.
  9. https://www.scouting.org/health-and-safety/gss/gss01/#a Specific to the question: Adult Supervision Two registered adult leaders 21 years of age or over are required at all Scouting activities, including meetings. There must be a registered female adult leader 21 years of age or over in every unit serving females. A registered female adult leader 21 years of age or over must be present for any activity involving female youth. Notwithstanding the minimum leader requirements, age- and program-appropriate supervision must always be provided. (Youth Protection and Barriers to Abuse FAQs) Two youth, need two 21+ adults leaders. Note the FAQ for single scout meeting with MBC. Adult Supervision Q: The Barriers to Abuse say that there must be two registered adults present for all Scouting activities and meetings. Does that include merit badge counseling? Fund-raising events? A. Yes. However, the parent or legal guardian of the Scout may serve as the second adult. This parent or legal guardian does not have to be a registered leader.
  10. RichardB

    2019 GUIDE TO SAFE SCOUTING

    @John-in-KC Please note that the 2019 version Animal and Insect Hazards https://www.scouting.org/health-and-safety/gss/gss13/ contains a link to the following reference, please review before working with mouse turds. https://www.cdc.gov/rodents/index.html
  11. RichardB

    Candle Lanterns

    All those Scouters you have run into are correct. Candles in a tent are prohibited for BSA activities.
  12. RichardB

    Scout to Merit Badge Counselor Ratio

    Suggest a review of the Barriers to Abuse as two scouts with a counselor is no longer acceptable - https://www.scouting.org/health-and-safety/gss/gss01/#a Adult Supervision Two registered adult leaders 21 years of age or over are required at all Scouting activities, including meetings. There must be a registered female adult leader 21 years of age or over in every unit serving females. A registered female adult leader 21 years of age or over must be present for any activity involving female youth. Notwithstanding the minimum leader requirements, age- and program-appropriate supervision must always be provided. (FAQ’s)
  13. RichardB

    Wood Badge and Part C

    Cardiac related issues, for men over the age of 40 are a real issue in and out of Scouting. Hypertension is just one risk factor. Would suggest the OP engage a PCP and address the issue and potential others. Would also suggest that it's something the OP should discuss with the leadership team of the WB course, no differently than you would want a participant in your unit to address any restrictions or potential work around. Not sure where the OP is going to WB, it might make a difference.
  14. Circle Ten Council does a WB course at Philmont Scout Ranch in August. http://circleten.org/wood-badge If you are looking for something different. I've sent several folks to this course in the past.
  15. RichardB

    Scouts BSA FAQ dated 9/14/18

    https://www.scouting.org/familyscouting/ is the one source of truth from the national council.
×