Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Tampa Turtle

Benefits of Scouting for Scouters

Recommended Posts

Obviously the folks on this forum must get a lot of scouting as an adult Scouter to stay in despite all the sturm und drang in modern scouting. I have been thinking about this lately and I was wondering: why do you really do it? What is the pull of scouting to an adult over other pursuits? Just curious. ( I put this topic in 'Issues" rather than 'Program; since it is more of a philosophical thread.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

great question!

For me.... primary draw was to do my share.  My son joined scouting and I'm not so inclined to just let others do for me.  Just like at the end of the meeting when it's time to put away the chairs, I'm usually among the first to jump up and start stacking..... while others are leaving the room.

Secondarily....

I enjoy "doing the things that scouts do" to borrow a phrase from Clarke Green, so naturally I'd like to do those things with my son (doing those things that scouts do to me, means the camping, hiking, backpacking, canoeing, etc.... not so much the classroom stuff, arts and crafts, book work stuff, etc...)

Even though I'm introverted, I enjoyed the fellowship with other scouters, I enjoyed sharing in the occasional discovery with the boys, and in some cases I enjoyed getting to know the parents...other folks in my church that i did not know before.

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They program has a way of sucking you in. You can get attached to some of the lads and really want to be there for them though they may not really know it.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I got both noble and selfish reasons.

Noble:

I want to pay back the adults who were involved in Scouting when I was a youth.

I want my sons and their friends to have as good, if nor better, experience in Scouting than I had.

I want to be a positive influence in my community.

Selfish:

SCOUTING IS FUN!

"SCOUTING IS OUTING"

I get a "rush" talking to my Scouts and hearing about their lives journeys and seeing their successes.

This topic came up at a funeral this weekend. Oldest son's first SM, "went home."  He left instructions as to what he wanted done. Scouting was such a factor in his life, he was buried in his uniform.  Our Honor Guard detail provided a color guard for his service. 98% of the troop showed up and in full uniform (we haven't gotten this ever, including COHs!) It was standing room only as many folks who were Scouts under him, or served with him as a Scouter came from out of town to pay their last respects. The "eulogies" were all reminiscing about Scouting events in the past. When the service was over, and folks went to pay their respects to the family, Scouting was the topic of conversation, and it lasted so long that many had to leave and could not attend the graveside service. 

Long story short, this one guy made that much of an impact on many peoples lives. I hope the same can be said when my time comes.

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For my sons.  I try to give back as others gave to create and sustain the program that benefited my sons.  

I often wonder how long I will participate after my sons age out.  I just don't know.  I often think that scouting is best when it's a youth program.  And, I'm not qualifying as a youth anymore . Perhaps I'll volunteer as a camp master.  Perhaps I'll continue my current roles.  But, I just don't know.  

I do love sleeping under the stars, listening to a rain storm at 2am, socializing and playing cards.  But it's a lot of work to pack-in, pack-out and deal with all the issues.  Also, the hardest reason to continue is it's extra work.  There is no reason I have to participate.  So I could choose not to participate and I'd have more time, more space in my garage and a lot more flexibility in my life.

I just wish I learned ten years earlier how to build a nice really comfortable bed in my tent.  Now that I can, it's really nice.  

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll be the nerdy one, I really really enjoy watching the scouts get it with decision making. I also found that I enjoyed being an adult trainer for the same reason. And it is the main reason I hang around here. I love this scouting stuff.

Barry

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, Eagledad said:

I'll be the nerdy one, I really really enjoy watching the scouts get it with decision making. I also found that I enjoyed being an adult trainer for the same reason. And it is the main reason I hang around here. I love this scouting stuff.

Barry

Not nerdy at all. It is a fascinating experience in human organizational dynamics!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, Tampa Turtle said:

Not nerdy at all. It is a fascinating experience in human organizational dynamics!

Oh, I forgot. I enjoy people watching too.

Barry

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I get asked to do lots of things. I said yes to scouting (and stopped doing other things) for one simple reason: to work for smiles!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have benefited from Scouting my entire life. I felt my son could as well, so I started for him. I continue for all the other sons.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a good experience as a scout and a lot of fond memories of my time as a scout and earning Eagle.

I wanted my sons to have the same experience and I wanted to be actively involved to give back to the program.

In hindsight, if I knew then what I know now, when I initially encouraged my older son to join the Cub Scouts, I would never have allowed he or my younger son to ever get involved with the Boy Scouts of America. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/13/2017 at 1:04 PM, fred johnson said:

.....

I often wonder how long I will participate after my sons age out.  I just don't know.  I often think that scouting is best when it's a youth program.  And, I'm not qualifying as a youth anymore . Perhaps I'll volunteer as a camp master.  Perhaps I'll continue my current roles.  But, I just don't know.  ......

Over the last few years, we've owned an RV and have enjoyed it.  i never used to picture myself as being one of those retired full time RV people.... but now I can in a way.  I've thought a few times that I could picture myself volunteering at a BSA camp for a few months over the summer if they gave me a place to park the RV.

I enjoy scouts....but....

My son isn't aging out.  he's quit.... and so I find myself resigning my post.  I'm currently training my replacement and my BSA registration will expire at recharter.  As I told the committee I feel the troop will be better served by someone that comes to the meetings more regularly. 

I think that IF i found myself in a SM role, and IF i was retired, with lots of time on my hands, I might maybe see myself staying on with the troop.  It would be fun

but

on the other hand, and I know there are exceptions to this, but first hand & personally I know of zero scouters that are really effective and energetic without sons in the troop/pack.  It seems that they try hard in many case, are well intentioned.....but it's just too easy to find excuses to miss meetings, miss outings, etc...

 

And besides i have mixed feelings in another way....

on one hand I think it's good sometimes to open up the few positions taht adults can fill to new parents wanting to do their part

but on the other hand I see so many folks that want to "go camping with their kid", and while that's admirable that's not the point of scouts.  Those folks might be better served if there wasn't an open position in the troop for another scouter....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/13/2017 at 4:00 PM, Sentinel947 said:

I do it because I want the Scouts in my troop to get a better experience than I did as a Scout, and I got a pretty good one! 

Pretty much the same.  However, I find that without my boys in the Troop, my interest has waned.  That said, the years I was a leader, the Scouts had an overall better experience than I did. That's why I was a Tenderfoot with 1 MB, and both of my sons are Eagles.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×