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perdidochas

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perdidochas last won the day on November 1 2018

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About perdidochas

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  1. Well, per this 2015 article, the above (t-shirt with tied necker) was totally acceptable per official BSA guidelines. https://blog.scoutingmagazine.org/2015/08/21/scout-neckerchiefs-now-approved-wear-nonuniform-clothing/ Previously, according to an earlier version of the Guide, the Scout neckerchief was “worn only with the official uniform and never with T-shirts or civilian clothing.”
  2. I think I would discuss it with his ScoutMaster, but would mainly do it to make sure the boy isn't being punished by the old troop, and he's reaching out to a new troop as the easy way out (we've had that happen in my boy's troop--a boy was being punished for an incident involving a knife, and he quit our troop and joined another.).
  3. I raised my sons to be that way. They had no problems telling adults if they were wrong. They were also pretty good about knowing when not to do so, albeit my oldest not so much as my youngest.
  4. I've heard both of those as well--that SMs are automatically MBCs for everything, and that MBCs shouldn't counsel their own children. Neither, of course, are real policies, although the second is a good idea, in most cases. I was an MBC for most of the Eagle Required (except First Aid, Swimming, and Lifesaving) Merit badges as well as an ASM. I would not counsel my sons on a MB if there were anybody else in the Troop that I thought could do a good job of it. I was their MBC for Cooking and for Environmental science for that reason. We didn't have other MBCs for those, and I was tougher on my sons than on another scout. I also wouldn't sign off on any rank advancement that they had that wasn't recorded elsewhere. I would sign off, for example, requirements of number of outings, etc. for them, but that's because we had that recorded in the advancement record system we were using at the time. Our SM had two sons in the Unit. He never signed off anything for them, and had others do the SM conferences with them.
  5. Most of the SM's I've met wouldn't want to be MBC. They have enough to do as it is.
  6. I don't see the big deal. When I signed up as a district level MBC and did it for about 5 years, I had two Scouts from outside of my troop request for my services as a MBC.
  7. I've always thought the purpose of YPT was as a CYA for those of us who don't violate children. I've been YPT certified for most of the time since 2006 or so. Besides the "rules" of interacting with youth, I've never thought it was a good training in recognizing the predators (the training I've had to do because our Troop is chartered by a Catholic Church is much better at that part, although not as clear about specific rules for interacting with youth. Having both the BSA and the diocesan trainings has been a good combination for me). That said, the situation outline by the OP is troubling. My first YPT training was in September, and by the end of my time as a leader it was in June (did it early a few times, to make sure I had it for summer camp or some other situation).
  8. In Alabama, it's never too cold for manhunt. It can be too warm for it, though.
  9. Don't quite understand this sentence "the rule in our troops on normal campouts is that if it's not warm enough to play manhunt in the evening or at night near our campsite, then I’ll show a movie instead…" It's never too cold to play manhunt. It can be too warm to play manhunt. I will admit, we have watched a movie as a troop at a campout. It was a hot, rainy night (84 degrees or so with 95% humidity at 8 at night), and was actually too hot to play manhunt or almost any other outdoor game.
  10. I have to admit, I would feel uncomfortable with a scout leader who wanted to meet me in my home shortly after meeting him. The above wouldn't be welcoming in my book, but nosy.
  11. Wow, we just always told the parents that rank advancement in Boy Scouts was an individual thing, and that there was no plan. Yes, the ASMs would individually talk to scouts, and might even help them plan out their next rank, but there was no overall plan, other than a campout every month, and a meeting every week (at the time, we met every Monday except for the Monday between Christmas and New years (or both if those holidays occurred on Monday) and the week of summer camp. Rank requirements were done at every campout, the Scouts are responsible for doing them. Scouts could ask an ASM to sign off on requirements on the great majority of meetings. I would have reassured her that we don't kick out Scouts for non-advancement, so we allow them to go for as long as they want without rank advancement.
  12. I thought the above as well, until I saw my oldest son check them out from the library.
  13. We are dying, slowly but surely, and have been dying for at least 20 years. I don't understand why. I personally still think that Boy Scouting is the best youth program developed in the United States. (that said, all youth activities are dying. The number of youth athletes is also down).
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