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TAHAWK

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Everything posted by TAHAWK

  1. I'll tell the next bear I run into. 😉
  2. BSA: " When ready to leave, properly take down the snow structure." PROGRAM FEATURES FOR TROOPS, TEAMS, AND CREWS: Vol 3, A Guide to Program Planning, BSA (2016) Many useful pages but not a single mention of a "patrol," the context, for Scouting, BSA continues to say in the Scouitmaster Training syllabus,
  3. "Leave no trace" is an aspiration. Nothing wrong with aspirations.
  4. Yes. for the reason given, not because it's "waste."
  5. TAHAWK

    Hair-Brained Idea du Jour...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x-xiiK5Y2BU
  6. TAHAWK

    Wood splitting tips

    "If your axe becomes stuck in a log, turn it over and swing the combined axe/log down onto your stump, axehead first to get more penetration. (Does not work with double bladed axes...) Plan the arc of your swing to end at the top of your stump, not the top of your target log. (You were planning to split the log completely on half, right?) On really large diameter rounds (24 inches and up) don't start in the middle; split small pies out of the edges and work your way in." I've done this. BSA is not in favor these days, although once it taught the wood-first technique.
  7. TAHAWK

    Discussing LDS beliefs in relation to Scouting

    Our resident atheist , of the non-religious variety, has not been here lately. He takes care of deriding all religious beliefs with a vengeance.
  8. TAHAWK

    Hair-Brained Idea du Jour...

    In the 20s, the new tech was radio, and we had radio-oriented program. B-P was for program that attracted kids, so the issue should not be doctrinal purity, but "What works?"
  9. TAHAWK

    Discussing LDS beliefs in relation to Scouting

    "progressive ideas"
  10. Snow shelters are "human impact" that reduces the experience for others. Otherwise, Spring solves that problem - stacked up H²O - nicely where there is Spring weather. In the 1950s and 60s my old troop was thought eccentric for practicing "Pack it in; pack it out." The BSA orthodoxy was "burn bash, and bury." In the arid southwest, any child could plainly see BBB did't work. We doubted it worked in New jersey, where the rules were promulgated at the time. Bags were cotton or waxed paper. And we used single burner gasoline stoves (WW II surplus "squad stoves"), which also drew scorn from some: "Real Scouts use open fires." When I got back in in 1981, BSA expressly discouraged "chemical stoves." As late as 1987, a neighboring council prohibited all "liquid fuel appliances" at its two camp properties. (They are still big on long lists of "NOs.")
  11. TAHAWK

    Frugal Backcountry Cleanliness

    Natural sponges allow a "sponge bath" that is very refreshing, even using only water. They are costly compared to cellulose sponges, but they are Sooooo soft and last (I have three purchased at a Kroger in 1966 - still work fine,) Rarely, if it seems needed, I add a couple of drops of detergent, and rinse off with a canteen of water. 😊
  12. TAHAWK

    Information about a slide!

    I keep looking, but can find no further information. Our Scout museum has a collection of over 3000 slides. They are of known background only by happenstance.
  13. Most "camp counselors" are minors. As such, they cannot be Registered Merit Badge Counselors and, so, have zero authority to pass any candidate on any Merit Badge requirement, although a minority are actually knowledgeable, some extremely so. Nevertheless, the Merit Badge Mills "must' grind on to generate income for councils - THE priority.
  14. Because a registered Merit Badge Counselor -- registered for the Merit Badge in question -- must sign the Blue Card certifying that the candidate has completed each requirement for the Merit Badge, then a registered Merit Badge Counselor is absolutely needed for the "partial" to be completed. Only such a registered merit Badge Counselor may sign a Blue Card. From my personal experience since 1981, most council Summer camps cheat (e.g., Personal Management from zero in five, fifty-minute sessions). Some troops cheat. I speak only of the rules, not cheating tolerated by councils and BSA or parental expectations of the "Good job!" generation. Learning that one must actually perform to get the reward is an important life lesson. Good luck.
  15. TAHAWK

    What are the BSA priorities??

    Problem is, traditional Scouting, in the sense of the Outdoor Program, was down-graded before today's typical Scoutmasters were born. So even those with experience as Scouts experienced a watered-down version. The typical Scoutmaster lasts less than a year. Through training, they had a shot at learning what is no longer in the literature - exciting outdoor program and the Patrol Method, our "essential method." The time allocated to training unit adults has been sharply reduced over years since the "improved Scouting Program" savaged our youth AND adult membership numbers. What was an "outdoor weekend" for unit adults (Fri night - Sunday afternoon) is now a single day, and slightly more program material used to get a six-day "week" called "Wood Badge'" - Scoutcraft through First Class (until 1972). Leadership at the council level is given to "good Scouters" = $$$$$$$$$$$$, whether they are even interested in leading training or not. Add council leadership whose "logic" is that less of a thing is the solution for poor quality., and the knowledge is dying out. If computer stuff was attractive, it might not matter. The objective is to attract youth. But Scout computing seems as popular as Scout Soccer - not too. This financial maneuver is all over the internet, but BSA says only: “Earlier this year, the Boy Scouts of America (BSA) renewed and revised certain credit facilities through a process approved by our National Executive Board.” The spokesperson also said, “We will not be providing additional commentary.” I once lawyered for the Erie-Lackawanna Rd. It was in terrible financial condition for a variety of reasons, having filed for bankruptcy protection in 1972. My employer at the time had been appointed by the Bankruptcy Court to defend litigation of various sorts. One day in early 1976, I called the EL offices on business, and no one answered the phone. I tried other numbers with the same result. I walked over to the EL headquarters offices, and the lights were on but no one was there. Cups half-filled with cold coffee and last week's newspapers (including copies of the Cleveland Press, itself dead by 1982) gave clues to the timing of the abandonment of the EL's offices. After that, it existed only as a legal fiction for a few more years - entries in Bankruptcy records. Portions were folded into Conrail. Change is inevitable. Sometimes change is improvement.
  16. Another factor is Darwinian - those that can escape do so, leaving those who cannot. Read Night Comes to the Cumberlands: A Biography of a Depressed Area.
  17. TAHAWK

    What are the BSA priorities??

    He was once a "rising star," but came a cropper elsewhere. We are a last chance posting for ambitions to rise to, or very near, the top.
  18. The "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant" movie "Deliverance" predates the current constitutional crisis by some decades. One might recall how President Carter was ragged on by the Eastern and Western elites of his own party until, in his old age, he became a leading attacker of Bush the Younger. One would think that if working with certain people is terrifying, you would simply not do it.
  19. TAHAWK

    What are the BSA priorities??

    Our Council Executive: "Traditional Scouting does not work today." "Scouters are not happy with the quality of our training. We need to cut back on training." (Apply that logic to meals at Summer Camp.) Eliminated FOS ?("Why should we have to ask every year?) in favor of a program where "friends of Scouting" are asked to authorize monthly automatic withdrawals from a bank account - like automatic bill paying for cell phone service. General fund raising down 1/3 year over year. Eliminated districts and set up "Service Areas" run by "professionals," typically with under two years involvement in Scouting. Roundtable attendance down 45%, and falling. Ninety minutes of announcements and fund raising does not seem especially attractive. I do agree that there is absolutely no reason to blame National for all our problems.
  20. BSA has admitted females as youth members in some programs since 1969 (Exploring, when it was a mainline BSA program for 14-17).
  21. Politicians focus on retaining their "core constituency." BSA, not so much.
  22. TAHAWK

    What are the BSA priorities??

    In 1972, the Improved Scouting Program was introduced. Wikipedia article History of the Boy Scouts of America http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Boy_Scouts_of_America#The_1970s:_the_Improved_Scouting_Program "The BSA commissioned a series of studies and developed an updated program to modernize Scouting in a manner similar to the changes of the British Boy Scout Association in 1967. September 1972 saw the launch of the Improved Scouting Program. The Cub Scout Promise was changed from "to be square" to "to help other people", as the term square went from meaning honest to rigidly conventional. The use of boy was de-emphasized: the eighth edition of the handbook was titled simply Scout Handbook and the new strategic logo used Scouting/USA. Much of the Scoutcraft information and requirements were removed, replaced by information on drug abuse, family finances, child care and community problems. Conservation included both urban and wilderness areas. The concept of the personal growth agreement conferences was introduced as a requirement for each rank. Under the new program, a Scout could reach First Class without going hiking or camping or cooking over a fire. The program was modified for a system of immediate recognition. Individual rank requirements were supplemented with skill awards recognized by metal belt loops. Ranks and merit badges were to be presented immediately, and recognized later at the court of honor. The merit badge programpreviously only available to First Class and abovewas opened to all ranks, and merit badges were required for Tenderfoot, Second Class and First Class. The number of required merit badges for Eagle Scout was increased to 24, and Camping merit badge was dropped from the required list. The entry age was changed to 11 or 10- if a boy had finished fifth grade. The Senior Boy Scout program was replaced by the Leadership Corps. Initially the Leadership Corps was limited to leaders 1415; older boys were expected to become junior assistant Scoutmasters or move to Exploring. The Leadership Corps could wear the forest green shirt with a Scout BSA strip until it was discontinued in 1979. The Leadership Corps patch was worn in place of the patrol patch, The first version of the patch was trapezoidal, replaced by a round patch in 1987. The red beret was initially introduced for the Leadership Corps, and extended for troop wear in 1973. Troop Leader Development (TLD), adapted from the White Stag Leadership Development Program, was introduced in 1974 to train youth leaders. The Cornerstone program was introduced to train adult leaders. Leaders who completed the course were recognized by a special version of the leader's emblem that was embroidered with Mylar thread, giving a shiny look. 1972 saw the introduction of new colored cloth badges for all ranks and positions, the new Webelos badge was introduced and the old badge became the Arrow of Light. In 1973, most Cub Scout leadership positions were opened to women, and in 1976 the Cubmaster, assistant Cubmaster, and all commissioner positions were opened. From the early 1920s, the BSA had been divided into 12 numbered regions, each designated by a Roman numeral, which consisted of territories of several states. The 12 regions followed the organization of the federal reserve system at that time. In 1972, the 12 regions were consolidated into a new alignment of six geographic regions (Northeast, East Central, Southeast, North Central, South Central, and Western). In 1976, concerns over the lack of emphasis on Scoutcraft and declining membership lead to the introduction of "All Out for Scouting", a back-to-basics program developed by William "Green Bar Bill" Hillcourt. The program was launched with "Brownsea Double-Two", a week long course for the senior patrol leader who would then introduce the troop-level "Operation Flying Start" to their units. Junior Leader Training (JLT) replaced TLD and Brownsea Double-Two in 1979. From a peak of 6.5 million Scouts in 1972, membership declined to a low of 4.3 million in 1980. [emphasis added] Hillcourt returned from retirement to write the ninth edition of the Boy Scout Handbook in 1979, returning much of the Scoutcraft skills. The number of Eagle required merit badges was reduced back to 21, and Camping was restored to the required list."
  23. TAHAWK

    Bikes in Camp?

    ONE OF OUR COUNCIL CAMP EXPERIENCES was at a PA council camp (now gone) near Moraine State Park (of flooded Jambo memory). Bicycles were promoted. Property was hilly with well-graveled, winding camp roads. The week included two ambulance runs and one Life Flight run to Pittsburgh for a ruptured kidney. These resulted from one biker losing it on a curve and two pedestrians run down when it turned out brakes did not stop well on thick, loose gravel. There were other serious safety issues at the waterfront and axe yard (like unwedged axe heads flying and chronic Buddy Board failures due to only two staff on duty).
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