Jump to content

TAHAWK

Members
  • Content Count

    3392
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    43

Everything posted by TAHAWK

  1. "A National Guard facility in Pennsylvania refused to allow a Trail Life USA scouting troop to tour their facility because of the group’s religious affiliation. The Fort Indiantown Gap National Guard facility regularly hosts tours for Boy Scout troops and other organizations, but the Trailmen were told they could not participate because they belonged to a Christian scouting organization. . . . The National Guard’s public affairs office did not return multiple inquiries seeking comment. . . . The ordeal began in February when Troop PA-2717 were initially told they could tour the facility. In April, a staff sergeant called the troop master and said the tour had been denied because of the group’s religious affiliation. The idea that Christian boys would be banned strictly because of their religious beliefs is not only ludicrous, but it’s also illegal. And that’s why the Trail Life troop got in touch with First Liberty Institute and the Independence Law Center, two organizations that specialize in religious liberty cases. “Fort Indiantown Gap’s denial of access to the base facilities, which are open to other civic, fraternal, and youth organizations and for youth activities, constitutes viewpoint discrimination,” the law firms wrote in a letter to the National Guard. The attorneys said the National Guard’s decision to ban the Christian scouting group is “discriminatory and unconstitutional.” John Stemberger, the chairman of the Trail Life USA board, said told the "Todd Starnes Radio Show" that it’s disheartening that a “federal institution like the Army is buying into this leftist idea that faith has to be excluded from the public square.” “It’s sad that an institution of our society is treating faith like it is some kind of bacteria or virus that needs to be exterminated from secular society,” Stemberger told me. “We need faith integrated with society.” The good news is that once First Liberty Institute and the Independence Law Center got involved, the National Guard quickly backed down and rescinded the ban on the Trailmen. “We are grateful that the Guard has chosen to open its doors to the Trail Life troop,” ILC attorney Jeremy Samek said in a statement. “The boys from Trail Life USA’s troop deserve to be treated fairly and equally. I know they are excited to get the opportunity to interact with those who defend our freedom.” https://www.foxnews.com/opinion/todd-starnes-trail-life-national-guard-pennsylvania
  2. TAHAWK

    New unit - what to consider first

    Good advice above. Give the Scouts in the patrol possibilities for campouts and hikes. If the choices are vetted, they can't go wrong, and having them decide affirms youth leadership. The PL, as the representative of his patrol to the troop, should take the possibilities to his patrol for their choice. This affirms that he represents and serves in this "miniature representative democracy." Eventually, they can research possibilities, but adults can always be resources ("Have you considered ....." "What makes a place a good campsite?)). Coach the PL to give every member of the patrol team to a "position" on the "playing field." Fun and adventure!
  3. TAHAWK

    Bullying incident - need advice

    Is the SPL actually trained for his job? Has he delegated responsibility to your son? Does the SPL have a mentor?
  4. TAHAWK

    Bullying incident - need advice

    I take you point. Most COs are fairly passive. However, what is the actual experience with the paid Scouters jumping in to take responsibility for interpersonal relationship, much less their abilities in that regard? Our DE-level employees (not having actual districts any more) last about six months on average and, while nice enough people, are so young and still trying to figure it all out - and then are gone.
  5. TAHAWK

    Bullying incident - need advice

    Was your son in fact selected by the SPL to be the ASPL? It is often not the case.
  6. TAHAWK

    Bullying incident - need advice

    BSA has made a brief, but useful effort to address just that issue: Bullying What Is Bullying? Bullying is a widespread and serious societal problem that has a negative impact on the “target.” (We do not use the term “victim.” [except when they do.] Additionally, never label a person who engages in bullying behavior as a “bully.” [except when they do]) It is not a “phase” that youth have to go through. It is not “just messing around,” and is not something that a youth—the one doing the bullying or the target—will “grow out of.” All forms of bullying are prohibited in Scouting. All forms of bullying violate the Scout Oath and Scout Law. Continued bullying of the target will lead to poor self-image and poor self-esteem. The target may also quit Scouting or become a bully to other, younger youth, thus perpetuating the bullying cycle. Forms of Bullying  Verbal—name calling, teasing, threats  Social—spreading rumors, leaving the target out of activities, breaking up or manipulating friendships  Physical—hitting, pushing, shoving, physical coercion  Group—intimidations, ostracizing  Criminal—injury, assault, sexual aggression  Cyberbullying—using digital technology such as social media, gaming, texting, etc., for any of the above Effects of Bullying Bullying has serious and lasting effects. While these effects may also be caused by other factors, research has found that bullying has significant effects on those who are bullied, those who bully others, and those who witness bullying. People who are bullied:  Have higher rates of depression and anxiety, including the following symptoms, which may persist into adulthood:  - Increased feelings of sadness and loneliness  - Changes in sleep and eating patterns  - Loss of interest in activities  Have increased thoughts about suicide that may persist into adulthood. In one study, adults who recalled being bullied in youth were three times more likely to have suicidal thoughts orinclinations.  Are more likely to have health complaints. In one study, being bullied was associated with physical health status three years later.  Have decreased academic achievement (GPA and standardized test scores) and schoolparticipation.  Are more likely to miss, skip, or drop out ofschool.  Are more likely to retaliate through extremely violent measures. Studies indicate that in more than 70 percent of school shooting cases, the shooter had a history of being bullied. Signs That a Youth Is Being Bullied  Acts reluctant to join in activities  Complains of feeling sick, makes frequent visits to the camp infirmary, has psychosomatic complaints  Loss of money and other items such as clothing, patches, etc., that a bully may have taken from them  Goes to activities late and/or returns early (avoidance)  Nightmares, bedwetting, insomnia (fear)  Refuses to leave their tent (fear)  Waits to go to the restroom away from group (avoidance/fear)  Seems afraid or acts nervous around certain youth  Shows increased anger for no obvious reason  Exhibits a drop in willingness to participate  Comments about loneliness  Has difficulty making friends  Suddenly has fewerfriends  Reluctance to defend oneself verbally or physically when teased or pushed  Has physical marks—bruises, cuts, defensive wounds on forearms or upper arms  Appears sad, moody, angry, anxious, depressed  Mentions or talks about suicide  Seeks, carries, or hides weapons (as a perceived means of protection)  Blames oneself for problems FACT SHEET  Avoids certain locations or areas
  7. TAHAWK

    Bullying incident - need advice

    It is not a district, council or Area issue. It is a CO issue. BSA has a number of online publications. Some are contradictory. Most are helpful. https://www.scouting.org/training/youth-protection/bullying/
  8. TAHAWK

    Bullying incident - need advice

    Barry, Please let me know where BSA makes discipline the CC's remit? Thank you.
  9. OK. I'll see if it changed from January. PAUSE FOR SEARCH. It has not changed. "Patrol method: Use the patrol method to develop youth leaders. The troop has patrols, and each has a patrol leader. There is an SPL, if more than one patrol. The PLC meets at least four times a year. Achieve Bronze, plus PLC meets at least six times. The troop conducts patrol leader training. Achieve Silver, plus PLC meets at least ten times. At least one Scout has attended an advanced training course, such as NYLT or Order of the Arrow Conference" REVISED TO ACTUALLY RECOGNIZE USING THE PATROL METHOD Patrol Method: Use the patrol method as defined by B.S.A. [inside joke. BSA is unable to explain the Patrol Method although that is a "Scout" rank requirement.] The troop has patrols, and each has an elected patrol leader who appoints his Assistant. If there is more than one patrol there is an elected SPL who appoints Scouts to fill other troop leadership positions and who leads the troop's activities. The PLC meets at least four times a year to plan program. Achieve Bronze, plus PLC meets at least six times to plan program. The troop conducts patrol leader training. Patrols have at least six independent activities each. Achieve Silver, plus PLC meets at least ten times to plan program. Patrols have at least six additional independent activities each. At least one Scout has attended an advanced training course, such as NYLT, National Advanced Youth Leadership Experience, Powder Horn, or The Kodiak Challenge. [OA Conference can be a leadership experience, but it is not leadership training.] Having patrols, PLs, an SPL, and PLC meetings does not equal USING the Patrol Method. Actually using the Patrol Method is emphatically not listed as a goal.
  10. Wearing a uniform (i.e., looking the same, clothing-wise) has slipped to an aspiration, as has the Patrol Method and, as part of that method, youth leading. Nothing wrong with aspirations. See "Leave No Trace." But what does BSA do to recognize actually achievingthe Patrol Method or to discourage adults from refusing to use that method? Zip, zero, nada. Actually doing it is not even part of Journey to "Excellence." Even the "lip service" is fading. A Scoutmaster who has taken no training and whose PLs cannot tell you the name of their patrol is named "Scoutmaster of the Year" here due to six sorta' Eagles and leading the Council in popcorn sales and Friends of Scouting donations. Troop had two indoor weekend JYE "weekend campouts" and summer camp at a merit badge mill that he skipped. Further, a real outdoor program is not even a serious aspiration for BSA, so trivial are the current outdoor advancement requirements. Thriftiness, as defined for the first fifty years of Scouting, is not even an aspiration. Scouting now overtly begs for money. So, yes, there are more serious problems in this declining age.
  11. I suppose anyone with authority can define a "uniform" as consisting of this or that. What does BSA - not the many unofficial sites or a council or unit - but BSA itself say? The BSA usually refers to the uniform as "the uniform" - no adjectives. See, e.g., https://filestore.scouting.org/filestore/pdf/33066/33066_Official_Policy_WEB.pdf ; http://www.trcscouting.org/files/d/usr/65/Scout uniform.pdf The final Boy Scout Handbook (13th Ed.) referred to the Scout uniform as "the Scout uniform" - no adjectives and as "BSA's official Boy Scout Uniform (sometimes called the 'field uniform')." it is also often called the "Class A uniform" or the "dress uniform". The last Boy Scout Handbook also says: "When you're headed outdoors to do something more active, you can [sic] pull on a T-shirt with Scout pants or shorts, or wear other clothing that is appropriate for the events of the day. This is sometimes called an 'activity uniform.'" BSA says it has a site that answers all questions about uniforming, but it answers almost no questions on that topic. The current offerings from BSA Clothing include six visually different button-up shirts for male Scouts alone, not mentioning all prior button-up BSA "uniform" shirts. Typical BSA "clarity." BSA at least suggests that it official "methods" have some importance. Reality shows otherwise, in uniforming as in outdoor program, thriftiness, patrol method, and leadership development.
  12. TAHAWK

    Orange Troop No. 1 at Camp Riley (1916-1917)

    BSA does seem to have arrived again in Orange County in 1920, The Santa Ana Register for November 4, 1920 solicited men as Scoutmasters for "Santa Ana Council" and mentions Scout Executive Elmer E. Heidt, often said to be the first Scout Executive in Orange County. Beyond that, things get vague, This article confirms that, as in many other areas, Scouting did not wait for BSA to arrive: "Noted local historian Phil Brigandi will discuss the history of Scouting in Orange County at the Orange County Historical Society's meeting this Thursday, Jan. 14, 7:30pm, at Trinity Episcopal Church, 2400 N. Canal St., Orange. He will also be available after the talk to sell and sign his excellent new book, On My Honor, A Century of Scouting in Orange County. Scouts (past and present) and the general public are welcome at no charge..The photo above shows Boy Scouts from Yorba Linda Troop 99 in about 1918. The photo below shows several Scouts from Orange County's first troop, Anaheim Troop 1, on an outing to Hewes Park in El Modena in about 1911. The Scout standing next to his bike in the center is future Anaheim mayor Charlie Pearson." AND "The first attempt to provide some sort of county-wide organization and support for local troops was in 1912, when the Santa Ana Council was formed with help from the YMCA. It lasted less than a year, and Scouting faded until World War I was over." I rely on the Troop 43 Log Book for the early history of that troop. But that was long ago. The present "Orange County Council" has claims founding in 1920 and 1921. It was founded in 1972 by the merger of two councils - Orange Empire and Northern Orange BSA has never had much interest in Scouting's past, especially the competing and pre-BSA past: the American Boy Scouts (later "United States Boy Scouts" and then "American Cadets"), Michigan Forest Scouts, LifeSaving Scouts, Colonel Cody’s Boy Scouts (1909), YMMIA Scouts, YMCA Scouts, Polish National Alliance Scouts, New England Boy Scouts, Knights of King Arthur, Knights of the Holy Grail, National Scouts of America, and Rhode Island Boy Scouts, to name just some. Some troops chartered with the Scouts in the UK, such as Barre, VT, Troop 1 in 1909. BSA would later describe the hundreds of troops founded other than through BSA as not "officially chartered" before their chartering with BSA, even if chartered by Baden-Powell's "Scouts."
  13. TAHAWK

    Orange Troop No. 1 at Camp Riley (1916-1917)

    The troop no longer exists. When BSA arrived for good in Orange County, California, in 1926, my troop was offered "Troop 1" but declined. It had its cheers, song and dark green silk flag proclaiming it's birth date and number. (made by a mom who embroidered it with "Semper Paratus" and the UK fleur-de-lis) As "The best troop in all the land is Troop 43," a numeral 1 was trivial. It irritated Troop 1 no end that every Scout Saturday, Troop 43 stood at the right of the line in the Santa Ana College bowl as senior troop. The oldest, but not the original Scout troop, in what is now Lake Erie Council is Troop 22, founded in 1908 at the Huff Avenue Presbyterian Church. Troop 22 went out of charter briefly in 1940 when every commissioned Scouter was in the same Guard unit nationalized by the Government - right at recharter time. A few weeks later, new Scouters had volunteered. Per the contemporary newspapers, there were 99 troops waiting when BSA arrived in the Cleveland, Ohio area in 1912, to establish the "Cleveland District" of BSA, five then claiming "Troop 1" status. A select committee of notables had to sort it out. Several different churches sponsored 22, which is now chartered to St. Paul's Episcopal Church in Cleveland Heights. Oddly, the Scouts of Old 22 also think their troop is best. ☺️ I am surprised that troops would give up their historic number for a "1."
  14. TAHAWK

    Orange Troop No. 1 at Camp Riley (1916-1917)

    California Peace Scout Troop 43 first had camping, by patrils, in October, 1908 on private property in orange County, California.
  15. There must be something more important than stamping out "Class B" - like having a uniform instead of merely a brand of heterogeneous clothing.
  16. TAHAWK

    Troop Communications and the Patrol Method

    It's easy to get lost when you forget, or never knew, the destination. Scouting is not about running a well-oiled machine. Mistakenly believing that a well-oiled machine is the boal, as BSA does from time to time, drives adult leadership. The goal is the Scout learning to accept and carry out responsibility, with all the bumps in the road that such a goal entails. The point is not that everyone "got the word" but that they were given the word, to whatever extent, by the leaders - youth not adults. Sadly, training is no longer a BSA priority, and most employees of BSA and councils are weak on what Scouting is supposed to be. So, noting that explaining the Patrol Method is now an advancement requirement (for "Scout"), I asked BSA for the answer. It could not give the answer or refer me to a coherent statement of what it is - just to bits and pieces. But they did want to help me with planning my estate. 😉
  17. TAHAWK

    Any tips for conducting an ILST?

    if you want to educate in the patrol method, you might review the ILST materials. They are overwhelmingly, as the title suggest, about the "troop method, " unlike the long-gone district-level Junior Leader Orientation Workshop, killed off in 2001 without explanation. JLOW began with 'Welcome to Scouting's Toughest job," and that referred to Patrol Leader, being based on actual Boy Scouting. Some Councils fight the good fight by offering JLOW despite BSA's abandonment of training outside the troop short of NYLT . Some volunteers offer JLOW independently of their councils e.g. http://www.chuh.net/troop22/resources/JLOW-02.pdf being pushed by many at BSA.
  18. TAHAWK

    Unlikely beginnings of Boy Scouting...

    Sorry, as I tried to explain, not very well, "Using the posted link, Wapo would not let me read more than the first paragraph of the written article unless I subscribed to their "service." I have used up my lifetime quota of "free" reading. " I meant WaPo's link ("Related Link'"), which got me, and gets me: This screen appears a few seconds after the linked text opens. WaPo is not in a position to give on-line access away, as it true of many other newspapers, such as the LA Times, in these days of newspaper death. You get to sample free for awhile, then must financially support them to get continued access. They could run an editorial "There is no such thing as free,." But that is not likely, even as they illustrate thew point.
  19. TAHAWK

    Unlikely beginnings of Boy Scouting...

    "June 13, 2019 The unlikely start of the Boy Scout movement" Washington Post. As it happens, I looked at the date Wapo assigned to the publication linked in the OP, quoted above. Using the posted link, Wapo would not let me read more than the first paragraph of the written article unless I subscribed to their "service." I have used up my lifetime quota of "free" reading. Nor do I have access to the podcast. So you got me; I only read the date Wapo assigned, not the publication date of the story - if different. If different, when did he publish the story? As for me, I am an elderly trained historian and have spent over fifty years studying Scouting history, with access for the last twenty years to the thousands and thousands of volumes and files of Scouting literature at two Scouting museums (one in Canada) to supplement my personal lifetime collection of books and clippings. I only wished I had the "Log Book" of Troop 43. founded in 1908. which documented the founding of California Peace Scout Troop 43, eighteen years before BSA showed up in Orange County, California,. Although I read it cover-to-cover many times, memory fails over fifty years later. When I went over to the dark side, I defended newspapers in libel actions in state and federal court - not a line or work for one who needs to win - holding down the bleeding was the optimum practical outcome.. I found that beating the opposition to the story had a much higher value than accuracy. Perhaps standards have improved or are higher at WAPO. Although the flawed story generated by three WaPo reporters "on deadline" about the Covington Catholic High Schoolers "confronted" by "activists" in D.C. in january, 2019, suggests otherwise. WaPo originally reported that one Nathan Phillips, a Vietnam vet, was prevented by a Covington Catholic High School student in the group from moving past them. The newspaper had also stated Phillips had been taunted by students before the encounter, and that the students were the instigators of the incident. When the full range of sound tapes became public and weeks had passed, WaPo published: "Subsequent reporting, a student’s statement and additional video allow for a more complete assessment of what occurred, either contradicting or failing to confirm accounts provided in that story,” the Post’s note states. WaPo acknowledged that it erred in stating that Phillips, who served in the U.S. Marines, was a Vietnam War veteran. In a separate correction, WaPo also noted it incorrectly characterized a statement from Covington High School as an apology instead of a condemnation, and had falsely stated that the group of teens involved in the incident could be heard on the video chanting “Build that wall” at Phillips. I see no evidence of conspiracy in this, merely confirmation that "speed kills." Mistakes will happen. Ditto "The 2016 election is already decided. History says Hillary Clinton wins." Not a conspiracy, just feelings. We are all imperfect clay, imperfectly modeled.. The most distinguished military historian of my adult life, Keegan, put his name to a history of WW II replete with errors. One infamous illustration is labeled as showing a German machine gun team in action during the invasion of France in May-June, 1040., the problem being that the MG42 shown was not in service until 1942. Even Homer nods. Homer never got a "Pulitzer," as is, not surprisingly, true of Pulitzer himself. Opinions,. as noted, differ about what date should be assigned as Scouting's "birthday." As some here already know, Scouting for Boys was first published in installments about two weeks apart by Windsor House, London E.C., during January, February, and March, 1908. The first combined edition was, as Sentinel1947 notes, published in May, 1908. The work had been written in 1907, the year of the first Scouting program. We moved to Hillcourt's "Patrol Method, (our defining method) with youth-selected leaders in 1929-1930 - very different from BP's "Patrol System" where the "officer" (Scoutmaster) appoints the leaders. Boy Scouting as defined in BSA's Congressional charter went away this year, replaced by BSA Scouting. Take your pick of dates. The World Organization of the Scouting Movement, joined by every national Scouting organization I can find except B.S.A., celebrated the Centennial in 2007. If WaPo is "right." the WOSM must be "wrong." I didn't say WaPo was wrong. I asked a question and stated facts about when some Scout troops started up. The answer to the question is a matter of opinion, and the facts remain facts. As for jabbing the Post, they are not even in the league of BSA, which proclaimed the "100th Anniversary of Scouting" to fall in 2010. Are accusation of sarcasm and "snide" comments reasonably to be taken as "personal"? I guess not.
  20. TAHAWK

    Faith and Chaplaincy Issues

    One can only hope.
  21. TAHAWK

    Unlikely beginnings of Boy Scouting...

    So Scouting began in 1909? Funny. I have been with two U.S troops that started in 1908, and many Canadian troops did the same. But, then, it's the Washington Post: "The 2016 election is already decided. History says Hillary Clinton wins."
  22. TAHAWK

    Faith and Chaplaincy Issues

    And BSA is selective in its "religious" discrimination, accepting some religious atheists for generations and rejecting religious "pagans" who are emphatically believers.
  23. TAHAWK

    Who carries a firearm on Scout Outings???

    Illegal in 11 of the 13 I checked. But the burden of proof is on he who asserts the affirmative. I assert no more than I posted. Then, for what it's worth, there is BSA policy. No Personal Firearms at Scouting Activities The BSA is reinforcing its stance on handguns or other firearms at Scouting activities, with the open or concealed carry of handguns or other firearms. While various state laws may have authorized individual Scouters to legally carry or conceal firearms, they are NOT permitted to carry them while involved in Scouting activities outside of the shooting sports program. This applies to all persons involved in the activity, as the activity should be under the control of an appropriate Scouter. This has not changed. Review the BSA policy in the Guide to Safe Scouting in both the Shooting Sports section and the unauthorized activity listing that states, “Except for law enforcement officers required to carry firearms within their jurisdictions, firearms shall not be brought on camping, hiking, backpacking, or other Scouting activities except for those specifically planned for target shooting under supervision of a currently certified BSA national shooting sports director or National Rifle Association firearms instructor.”
  24. TAHAWK

    Faith and Chaplaincy Issues

    Rubber chicken is a great wilderness survival asset. Stone chicken not so much.
  25. TAHAWK

    Who carries a firearm on Scout Outings???

    Not to argue with your logic, but in Ohio it is a crime to have a loaded firearm in the passenger compartment of a motor vehicle unless you have, illogically, a concealed handgun permit. Ohio Rev. Code § 2923.16(B). From what i find on line: Ditto Maine Ditto Oklahoma Ditto California except in certain areas outside municipalities. Ditto Wisconsin Ditto Connecticut except for interstate transportation across the state Ditto New Jersey with some complications Ditto new York, except for long-barreled long arms "in certain hunting scenarios" outside NYC. Ditto in PA Ditto in Illinois Ditto in indiana Ditto Michican OK in Texas if longarm or concealed handgun. (contrary to Florida which requires concealment in a secure container) OK in Montana So who told you its legal in "most states"?
×