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Scouting History

Share and celebrate the history of the world's largest youth Movement

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  1. Local Council History Books 1 2

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  • LATEST POSTS

    • The saying in our neck of the woods was, "no scout ever died of starvation on a weekend camping trip".
    • Yes, but herein lies the the interests of the National and the insurance companies. They are going to want (and are asking, see the claim's form) something more than "someone did something bad to me at some time when I was a scout".
    • if the adults are not trained properly, the "natural" thing they tend to do is be "helpful."  " Here, let me help.  You will burn that pancake [taking the flipper in hand]." Hence the counsel of my first Sm: "No one ever died of a burned flapjack."   The primary job of a Scoutmaster, beyond insuring safety, is training the leaders to lead their patrols and troop.  But if, the adults don't know where they are supposed to be going, the odds of getting lost are rather high.  So the BSA deemphasis on adult training , including of lack of knowledge about the Scouting program themselves, is having predictable results    
    • Could that be because many of those claims are nothing more than a response to lawyers hawking the idea of a big payday?   I know for a fact that abuse did occur, and have first hand knowledge from more than 50 years ago.  I also cannot believe, based on the few real cases I have first hand knowledge of, that the true numbers are anywhere near what the lawyers want the public to think. We had a discussion at a council leadership event almost a year ago on this topic, and what was likely to come in regards to bankruptcy.  We were given the example of someone who filed a claim, but could not recall the name of the council (it hasn't changed in 99 years); they also could not remember the name of the camp the alleged incident took place at (only camp in the council, same name for 70 years); they could not remember the time period or what unit or who abused them, nor could they remember what the abuse was, just that something happened somewhere and at some time, and the council should pay them for it.  I would think a lot of that remaining 60% of claims may be similar.  We don't know when, where, what, or who, but we deserve money.  I have no problem with helping those who really were harmed, and have been unable to recover from what happened to them.  I was told by a member of the national executive committee familiar with this issue that national has paid out hundreds of thousands of dollars in the past few years, paying the therapist of the victim's choice, without questioning their claim's validity.  Once the lawyers got done with their suits against churches and turned their sights on the BSA, that was no longer considered an acceptable response. As to the lawyers wanting CO information going back countless decades and unit rosters as far back as they may exist, I see that as a case of 'here is a list of troops that used to exist where you once lived, pick one out and then look at the roster and pick a name, preferably of someone who is no longer around to dispute your claim.' Sorry if this went on too long, but there is a reason why statutes of limitation exist, and this is a prime example of why.  It is almost useless to try to prove something did or did not happen 50, 60, or 70 years ago; which is exactly what these lawyers count on to help make today's scouts line their pockets.
    • Well said..     I was observing a  newly elected PLC of a half dozen PLs and SPL and ASPL.   The Scoutmaster wanted  them to rough out the next years schedule.  They sat there WAITING (that was exactly what they were doing)  for the SM to TELL them what to do, what to WANT to do. The SM made some suggestions, things the Troop had done in the past, new ideas he had heard from other Scouts...  finally, the SPL said, "you mean I can make that decision ? ?" The SM spread out his hands and said  "DUUUHHH ?""  the year eventually was planned and the Troop had some old and some new adventures. Before he aged out , that SPL finally was brow beat by the SM to complete his Life requirements and was awarded his First Class, his Star and his Life all at the same, last, CoH.   He eventually became a head cashier for  local bank.  He did Scouting....    BP's idea was that the older Scouts teach the younger ones.  MAYBE the adults teach the older Scouts (Totin Chip, Orienteering, Pioneering, etc.) but the Troop Instructors, the Troop Guides, the PLs must be the ones who example and role model the skills and Scout stuff.   Otherwise, "my parents make me come" will be the reason rather than "Jake taught me how to set up my tent and cook over a fire.".   
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