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Shoes or Sandals?

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OK, here's a question.

 

Are the shoes like I've linked to here, considered shoes, or are they sandals?

.... well really what do you THINK the camp officials would say at most council reservations?

 

Sandals are specifically banned at the out of state council summer camp we're attending.  I think they are at our local reservation too.  Only allowed in the shower.

 

BUT

 

I'm really buying into Andrew Skurka's suggestion to ditch the waterproof boots, and instead go light weight and quick drying.  Bonus too, as I live in a warm climate.

 

These water shoes really caught my eye, and in my judgement they are perfect hiking shoes for less than technical trails
ones like this one, or similar

http://www.amazon.com/Chaco-Mens-OutCross-Outdoor-Sneakers/dp/B01159VKW6/ref=pd_sim_309_4?ie=UTF8&dpID=511ggn1moQL&dpSrc=sims&preST=_AC_UL160_SR160%2C160_&refRID=1DG1RHHTXZKSF8QMMNRY

or

http://www.amazon.com/Arroyo-Hiking-Sandal-Slate-Bronze/dp/B003Z4JOWS/ref=sr_1_8?s=apparel&ie=UTF8&qid=1461098526&sr=1-8&nodeID=7141123011&keywords=keen+water+shoes

 

So I ordered a similar pair for me.

but I also need to buy some hiking shoes for my son before summer camp.

 

Would they work?

 

 

 

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I do a lot of watersports so I have shoes, boots and sandals.

 

Two of the problems with sandals are 1) open toes and 2) thin soles.  Dropping a kayak on boot or shoe is painful, on an open toe of a sandal is wicked.  Tent pegs can cut through thin soled sandals and can also just miss the sole and slice the side of one's foot.

 

Both these examples seem to compensate for those two sandal short-comings.

 

Whenever I do BWCA or any heavy whitewater canoe/kayaking I wear the old military jungle boots.  Massively heavy soled with steel plate to ward off pungi stakes or sticks on the portages.  Soles that will handle broken glass etc. people toss in the rivers.  The leather toes and heels protect them and the high lacing makes for great ankle support.  The rest of the boot is nylon mesh which allows the water that runs into the boot to run out just as fast.  After 20 years of watersports, they are still my favorites.   For a Sunday afternoon paddle, I do wear sandals.  For whitewater, I drag out the jungle boots.

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I have a pair of sandals as per your second link. (My crew president nick-named them "Man-dles",) They are basically my camp-relaxing/stream-crossing gear which my rated carabiner holds to my pack -- along with my tin cup -- when it's not holding a hammock. ;)

 

I do like them for fishing/swimming/kayaking in rocky areas. They don't leave smudges on boat hulls.

 

They are passable walking shoes at our camp (which bans open toed shoes except in the showers) if you are going to the aquatics area and the slag/gravel hasn't worn off the path. Otherwise, they will snap your ankle in a second, allow creepers to snag your feet, and grind to shreds against central PA's highland granite.

 

So if your son is doing the weight conditioning of a ballet dancer, flagellating his hide to build up callous, and you are happy to chuck those buggers after 30 miles of rocks and bogs, go right ahead.

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If you can see your skin below the ankle then you're wearing sandals. ;)

 

What department are they sold in? If beachwear, you're wrapped helicaly around an inclined plane.

 

If sold in the Hiking Dept you are covered. :cool:

Edited by Krampus

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I think to begin, my answer would be to contact the council that runs the camp you're headed to and ask them - I don't know if there is someone you can e-mail what you've put here, but I'd hate to think you'd be sent out to go buy new boots if you got to camp and they said no based on the advice given here.

 

Saying that, I'm not 100% convinced that the reason for the ban is no open toe (and frankly, I would ban all men from wearing open-toed anything - no one wants to see our gnarly toes).  I like the look of those sneaks but unless it's a steel toe, its not going to provide all that much more protection that an open-toed sandal if you were to drop something heavy on it - about the only thing it might do is hold the blood in the toe of the shoe a little longer.  My hunch would be that they are wanting full foot protection - not just toe-protection - and with the sides having open spaces on it, you really aren't protecting yourself for sticks (especially sticks) or stones or anything else that can jab in there between the strips.

 

I've been wearing full coverage lightweight hiking shoes since 1985 - they're quick drying, and the ones I buy support my ankles as well - they dry as quickly as the shoes you're looking at, and probably aren't that much heavier.  I use old pairs to walk in creeks and rivers and marshes and never worry about getting the side of my foot sliced by something unseen.  They make great shoes for canoeing in, and I don't have to change shoes anytime I need to portage.

  • Upvote 1

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If sold in the Hiking Dept you are covered. :cool:

 

I don't know about that - REI and Erewhon sells all kinds of "trendy" shoes in their "Hiking Department" including Teva Sandals and water shoes.  I like your first thought better - if you can see skin (and please - no socks - never wear socks with sandals - and the real answer should be leave the sandals to women unless you're a "granola-head" (aka "hippie") (and no, I don't consider flip-flops to be sandals), you're wearing a sandal.

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(and please - no socks - never wear socks with sandals

Don't go to Europe, especially anywhere east of the Rhine, or Florida. ;)

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OK, here's a question.

 

Are the shoes like I've linked to here, considered shoes, or are they sandals?

.... well really what do you THINK the camp officials would say at most council reservations?

 

Sandals are specifically banned at the out of state council summer camp we're attending.  I think they are at our local reservation too.  Only allowed in the shower.

 

BUT

 

I'm really buying into Andrew Skurka's suggestion to ditch the waterproof boots, and instead go light weight and quick drying.  Bonus too, as I live in a warm climate.

 

These water shoes really caught my eye, and in my judgement they are perfect hiking shoes for less than technical trails

ones like this one, or similar

http://www.amazon.com/Chaco-Mens-OutCross-Outdoor-Sneakers/dp/B01159VKW6/ref=pd_sim_309_4?ie=UTF8&dpID=511ggn1moQL&dpSrc=sims&preST=_AC_UL160_SR160%2C160_&refRID=1DG1RHHTXZKSF8QMMNRY

or

http://www.amazon.com/Arroyo-Hiking-Sandal-Slate-Bronze/dp/B003Z4JOWS/ref=sr_1_8?s=apparel&ie=UTF8&qid=1461098526&sr=1-8&nodeID=7141123011&keywords=keen+water+shoes

 

So I ordered a similar pair for me.

but I also need to buy some hiking shoes for my son before summer camp.

 

Would they work?

I would call them closed-toed shoes, and I wear a similar pair to scouting events quite often--including summer camp at Camp Daniel Boone in NC.  Nobody has said a word.  They are as protective as most running shoes, and much more comfortable.

Edited by perdidochas

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As far as I'm concerened, they are OK.

 

We had a mom picking up son from day camp wearing flip flops. Between the car and the pick up area, about 75-100 feet, she fell and ripped a toenail. Having closed toe shoes would have helped.

 

Grant you I looking into some water shoes for an upcoming backpackign trip with some water crossings. But normally when dealing with water, it's ALTAMA brand jungle boots. They were the USGI manufacturer. Don't recommend ROTHCO jungle boots. About 10 days old Rothco boots had the sole come out when I was doing a portage on a practice trip. Git stuck in the mud, and the mud sucked the sole off.

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Rather than ban sandals our camp, and the troop, bar open toed & open heeled anything.  So what you posted and things like crocs (with a back strap) would be fine with us.  The ban on open toes isn't so much about dropping stuff on them it's that they snag and slip and lead to twisted ankles and face plants.  I wear Keenes most of the time, starting about a week ago when the snow melted up until it gets cold again.  At summer camp I'll wear them in the camp site or for short walks.  If I'm putting any miles at all on I put on boots for the extra all around support.

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I'm actually not intending to use them as water shoes so much, as hiking shoes.

The ones I ordered for me, are fully enclosed, but the fabric lets light through. It's only that the particular ones I tried on and liked happened to be that way.   There's actually very little difference between them and my Soloman hiking shoes.... except they are more comfortable and much more ventilated.  I'd say the uppers aren't quite as durable so I'm not thinking of them for hiking seriously rough or technical stuff..... but for sauntering down a maintained trail they should be perfect. Lightweight and quick to dry.

 

I'd have no problem of the ones with more open side holes for me... and therefore I'm ok with them for my son too... I just don't want him red flagged as he steps off the bus at summer camp.

Valid point about the side injury potential.  That was one of my first thoughts when I started considering them, but I've hiked miles in true sandals much more open than these without too much problem.

 

I read about a father and daughter that hiked the grand canyon rim to rim in those 5 finger toe-shoes, and these offer better protection that those I'd guess!

 

Don't go to Europe, especially anywhere east of the Rhine, or Florida. ;)

Good thing I'm in Florida.... and that I'm not trying to impress anyone with my fashion sense either, so any concerns about style have little weight with me. :D

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... I read about a father and daughter that hiked the grand canyon rim to rim in those 5 finger toe-shoes, and these offer better protection that those I'd guess!..

Came on a trail as a guy completing an extended hike in Filas for the first time was coming off. He said he definitely felt lighter on his feet, but had to walk more gingerly than he would have in boots. That particular trail wasn't very rocky, but I got the impression that he'd continue wearing them in future hikes.

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