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  2. desertrat77

    Limit for Cub Scout nights of camping

    @qwazse, excellent points all. I have one "however"--when it comes to risk management and to potential legal/civil action, I think clear cut rules are vital, whether we agree with said rules or not. @RichardB alluded to this his previous post, " Please do not put yourself or youth at risk."
  3. qwazse

    Voice of the Scout surveys

    To be fair, @Jackdaws asked the question in the OP in a way that supports a particular message:
  4. qwazse

    Limit for Cub Scout nights of camping

    Et. al, You've heard me state my Rule #1: Don't ask for a rule. You'll get one. That holds here! What I feel is useful is understanding. The incident reviews constitute a great step in this direction. What are some of the issues with Cubs and more than one consecutive overnight campout? Resident camps may have something to offer in terms of risks observed after night 2 vs. night 1. Maybe the Risk Management talked to some psychologists and there's something different when a pack spends time in the woods vs. a couple of extended families. Maybe, historically, BSA has wanted councils to own consecutive overnights for cubs. Disambiguation only let's people know if they are compliant, background gives them the ability to improve their judgement.
  5. HashTagScouts

    Survey

    So I did browse through the survey, as my son received the invitation. A lot of it is rating experience with call out, feelings about call out, feelings about Ordeal experience, etc. There was one question along the lines of "do you feel the BSA is headed in the right direction", with the response choices of agree or disagree, but there were sadly no follow ups on that thread. Seemed very oddly out of place to me that it didn't have any true direct follow up questions getting to why scouts felt one way or the other. There were some indirectly related questions later in the survey, on the level of participation for the respondent (such as I attend meetings frequently, infrequently, etc.).
  6. yknot

    Voice of the Scout surveys

    Several of the BSA surveys I've responded to over the years have used design mechanisms that can skew answers. Many surveys do this and it's why you have to be skeptical of survey results. When BSA issues a survey, they are generally looking for data that will support some marketing message they will eventually spin out.
  7. desertrat77

    Voice of the Scout surveys

    @Jackdaws, I believe they read the surveys. But that's all they do. Councils and National work to their own complete satisfaction. Anything other than praise is ignored.
  8. desertrat77

    Limit for Cub Scout nights of camping

    @RichardB, there's two ways to take your offer of defining "overnight." 1. Humor. 2. Acknowledgement that G2SS is vague enough to allow packs some leeway, and formally defining "overnight" would close the door on whatever freedom presently exists. Which is it?
  9. Today
  10. Do you really think anyone ever really reads what we type on these surveys?
  11. Jameson76

    Limit for Cub Scout nights of camping

    Didn't you mean - Twenty-seven 8-by-10 color glossy pictures with circles and arrows and a paragraph on the back of each one explaining what each one was, to be used as a Guide to Safe Scouting – even including some aerial photography.
  12. walk in the woods

    Limit for Cub Scout nights of camping

    I for one would very much like the G2SS be a one-pager that says, use common sense, talk to your parents, follow the oath and law. But, it doesn't. It's however many hundred pages with inclusions by reference, appendicies, and pictures with circles and arrows. Since that's what we have to work with, we'd like them to be clear and consistent. Here on this board you have what I'm going to assume is an honest question asked by a typical scouter. The responses to that question are showing some confusion with the wording of the various documents and web pages and local practices. Nobody wants more documentation, but a simple answer would be awful nice. Does overnighter mean just one night? It's a yes or no question. So, how bout you add some value and answer it.
  13. walk in the woods

    Country Meats

    This is our experience as well. People were going to buy the Christmas wreaths anyway, and now they get to support scouting along the way. Everybody wins.
  14. MikeS72

    "pitch a fit" induction

    Sound advice, although the situation being referred to took place 14 years ago. 😀
  15. Thunderbird

    Cleaning and Drying a Sleeping Bag

    Most of the time, just setting them out to air dry for a couple days is good enough. For tech fabrics, I wash in the washing machine using a detergent called HEX Performance. Then I put in the dryer using the no heat / air dry setting with a tennis ball or two to fluff it up again. Afterwards, can hang it up for a couple days to make sure it is completely dry before putting it away.
  16. I first attended WB in 1982, SE-293. I then attended WB for 21st Century, and is was very different from the last course. I have also participated in many courses and they were all a little different. I am going to attend the Summit course in Jan 2020 as a participant and I'm sure that it will be quite different from the first 2 courses that I attended. No matter if you took the Explorer Leader course at Schiff or the newest of the new course at the Summit, they all provide an enjoyable and informative training opportunity.
  17. Mrjeff

    "pitch a fit" induction

    This is certenly a sensitive situation. Perhaps this sh ould be brought to the attention of the Lodge Advisor who could look into the facts surrounding this induction. Then the Lodge Advisor can pass it on to the Lodge Chief who can present it to the LEC and let them decide. That way Scoutmasters, committees, and unit members who have a specific interest will be removed from any decision that is made. I suggest that whenever there is a conflict involving the OA, the Lodge Chief and his LEC be informed and allowed to take what action deemed appropriate.
  18. Jameson76

    Cleaning and Drying a Sleeping Bag

    Sometimes the large industrial washers and dryers do a good job. I have washed some of my synthetic bags that way. Did a down one hand wash and tumbled at the laundry
  19. qwazse

    Advice for a new CC

    That's actually fairly typical traffic for any new website. Folks out their are really bored. Actually, with the slew of World Scouts Jamboree participants passing through DC, you'd pop up on a lot of their searches. But, here's hoping that some of those are scouts whose parents are relocating to your fine city for a time and they want to stay active. The Italian exchange student who joined my crew was thrilled when she heard that she could continue scouting with my crew. It wasn't a perfect fit for her, but I think it bridged a couple of gaps.
  20. qwazse

    Cleaning and Drying a Sleeping Bag

    Roughly the same, but no fragrances/fresheners. I will leave them out a couple of days if the weather is nice. I will put my tech fabrics in a washer. Dry on low. My son's down bag: the tub, then dry on high briefly. I throw in a tennis ball to fluff it. My synthetic fleece blankets seem to go through the wash cycle well. Wool requires a little more care, but they don't smell-up as quickly either. That's probably because I don't pull them out unless I'm bracing for bitter cold.
  21. mrkstvns

    Limit for Cub Scout nights of camping

    There are other things that can be "overnighters" but that I don't consider to be camping. My son's pack did some "overnighters" like a night in the Zoo, or a sleep aboard on the USS Lexington. These are fun things for the boys to do, but they're not in the woods, don't involve setting up tents, don't involve cooking their meals, and similar things that really define "camping". Just saying...
  22. I try not to wash my sleeping bag very often because it's kind of a pain, and it always seems to feel a bit lumpy afterwards. Still, there are plenty of times where a good wash and dry is the only thing to do, short of buying a new one. GENERALLY... After each campout, I open it up, spray it with Febreze and hang it over the rail of my deck to air out. WHEN IT GETS TO SMELLY/WET/SWEATY/DIRTY... I hand-wash it in a tub using laundry soap, then I lay it out on the deck to dry. Usually, I wash it in the morning and leave it out all day in the sun. I NEVER... Wash it in a washing machine and I never dry it in a clothes dryer. I don't take it to a cleaners. What do you do to keep the sleeping bag clean and fresh and lasting as long as possible?
  23. Pale Horse

    Country Meats

    You're right, it's a donation to support Scouting. We're fine with that; we know it, and our customers know it. Nobody is "lying", if they want cheap popcorn, they know it can be bought inside the supermarket we're selling in front of. Yet for some reason, his Pack still sells thousands of dollars outside supermarkets. My son isn't trying to run a business. We're out funding our adventure in the most efficient manner possible, so we can get back to doing Scout stuff.
  24. Cburkhardt

    Advice for a new CC

    The results of the Troop coffee fundraiser are in, and we netted $7,600 to surpass our goal of $4,000. We probably have another $500 to come in from some stragglers. On top of this we received $6,000 from some institutional sources, so we have what we need to greatly subsidize the costs of our under-resourced families and their girls in our 30-Scout Troop. We will use some for some equipment purchases and make a Friends of Scouting contribution to our local council (something like $1,500). The rest we will save to begin building our long-term fund for stability. Thanks to everyone for the many good suggestions. We used every one of them. Note to Liz: There is no girl-specific Web Site template out there at this point. We wrote ours from scratch after we figured out how we would operate. Then we did our best to determine what an 11-13 year old girl and her parents would want to know about that implementation and wrote to that specific interest in our very-urban environment. We talk directly to that girl except for my “Scoutmaster’s Letter” to the parents — but even that is very specific to our urban all-girl implementation. I will say the writing of the site turned out to be the way we ended up understanding our challenges and deciding how the Troop would launch and operate. The site has been a huge hit. Our new parents love it because it is beginner-friendly and explains the basics without using any Scouting lingo or abbreviations. While not relevant to our use of our site, it is interesting to note that it has been viewed by 2.2K discrete visitors since going active on October 1, 2018, including viewers from 40 countries. Maybe this is just a typical result for troop web sites — I just don’t know.
  25. In my experience there are several factors as to why young adults do not stick around. College is indeed a big one. One issue I faced when I was under 25 was that other adults refused to view me as a fellow adult with the same knowledge, abilities, and skills that they had. As a 21 year old OA chapter advisor, that was a big issue with others on the district committee I sat with. I was either told I don't know what i'm talking about, or ignored all together. I had to use my allies on the committees to get my ideas across fro the benefit of the Scouts. Worse case was the SM who wanted me to alter the troop's OA election results. He actually followed me into the parking lot, cursing me out and saying I had no idea what I was doing in the OA. But the #1 factor I see now affects the 18-20 year olds, and we need to keep them active. The problem is thatr National no longer counts them as adults in regards to YP guidelines. I remember the stink that happened when National tried to implement the policy immediately, and troops started complaining to the councils and HA bases because they would have to cancel trips because they were relying on the 18-20 y.o. ASMs as the 2nd adult. If the young adults do not believe National trusts them as adults, why should they stick around?
  26. Jameson76

    New troop. New opportunity. Advice?

    Read Green Bar Bill Hillcourt's books. That will help
  27. There are older brothers of our scouts, with great skills that they learned in scouting, that I would like to tap to help with our Scouts BSA girls -- were they not away from home attending college. There are also older cousins, male and female, in their twenties, with Eagle Scout and Venturing backgrounds, that I would love to tap to help out -- except that they live out of state. We live in a town which people leave at age 18. And to which people move at around age thirtyish, already married, and either with preschool children, or thinking about soon having children.
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    • @qwazse, excellent points all.  I have one "however"--when it comes to risk management and to potential legal/civil action, I think clear cut rules are vital, whether we agree with said rules or not.  @RichardB alluded to this his previous post, " Please do not put yourself or youth at risk."
    • To be fair, @Jackdaws asked the question in the OP in a way that supports a particular message:
    • Et. al, You've heard me state my Rule #1: Don't ask for a rule. You'll get one. That holds here! What I feel is useful is understanding. The incident reviews constitute a great step in this direction. What are some of the issues with Cubs and more than one consecutive overnight campout? Resident camps may have something to offer in terms of risks observed after night 2 vs. night 1. Maybe the Risk Management talked to some psychologists and there's something different when a pack spends time in the woods vs. a couple of extended families. Maybe, historically,  BSA has wanted councils to own consecutive overnights for cubs. Disambiguation only let's people know if they are compliant, background gives them the ability to improve their judgement.
    • So I did browse through the survey, as my son received the invitation.  A lot of it is rating experience with call out, feelings about call out, feelings about Ordeal experience, etc.  There was one question along the lines of "do you feel the BSA is headed in the right direction", with the response choices of agree or disagree, but there were sadly no follow ups on that thread.  Seemed very oddly out of place to me that it didn't have any true direct follow up questions getting to why scouts felt one way or the other.  There were some indirectly related questions later in the survey, on the level of participation for the respondent (such as I attend meetings frequently, infrequently, etc.).  
    • Several of the BSA surveys I've responded to over the years have used design mechanisms that can skew answers. Many surveys do this and it's why you have to be skeptical of survey results. When BSA issues a survey, they are generally looking for data that will support some marketing message they will eventually spin out. 
       
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