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Working with Kids

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  1. Who Would You Ask? 1 2 3

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  2. No way to raise a boy 1 2 3

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  • LATEST POSTS

    • One theory and I just wanna offer this out is that you don’t adjudicate or litigate what doesn’t need to be adjudicated or litigated. everything you described is true it could impact the final plan. But if the plan is overwhelmingly rejected we don’t have to worry about it. if the plan is such that it’s clearly accepted overwhelmingly then we can worry about the edge cases like maybe one or two councils here or there who may not be included. but I guess the argument is is you get the plan out the door and voted on and then decide how you want to slice the data. Do you want to categorized by local council? By CO? By time barred versus non-time-barred? in other words from a methodological standpoint collecting the data first as long as you have an understanding of what it is you’re asking “do you approve the plan yes or no?” Then allows you to do what might be called cross tabs. Once you get the data you can start interpreting it. The other factor isn’t as much about statistics as much as it is about legal which I’m kind of surprised by but I believe the judge is going to bring up on Tuesday. Put putting aside how many angels dance on the head of a pin is this plan even confirmable? if 99.9% of people vote in favor of it does it still violate due process of victims or chartered organizations or insurance companies? that’s why I think it’s important that the judge said the first order of business on Tuesday is going to be hearing legal arguments about whether or not this plan should even go out the door
    • I once read that the difference between Japanese and American business strategy is the following:  Japanese approach: "Ready. Aim. Fire."  American approach: "Ready. FIRE! Aim."   
    • That's why it's critical that the older scouts who have mastered these skills be allowed to instruct and sign off.  Scouts get quite enough of adults droning on and on at school.  "He who teaches, learns twice" 
    • I guess I'll add my hunch.  If the vote comes back as 95% approval ... I think we exit with the plan as voted on.  It may have minor changes, but I bet the judge will say ... the claimants clearly support the plan, who am I to refuse.  With 95%, it is likely most if not all council and major CO subgroups probably passed the plan.   I think many of these issues will become sticky the lower that vote percentage is.   
    • Agreed.  There are so many issues that could substantially change the final plan that I question why they are proceeding with the vote first.  I wonder if the judge has to determine if the plan has substantially changed thus requiring a new vote.  One would think: step 1 - Ensure claims are valid (or at least do some sort of minimal vetting) step 2 - Discovery to ensure full transparncy of costs, assets, etc. step 3 - finalize a disclosure statement & plan ... something that is 95 - 99% done and ready step 4 - vote on said plan step 5 - agree on vote outcome, minor changes to plan if needed, release from bankruptcy   It seems like we are: step 1 - create a decent outline of a plan/disclosure step 2 - vote on said plan step 3 - discovery step 4 - agree on vote outcome, major changes to plan step 5 - vet claims I really don't understand it, but perhaps that is how it is suppose to work.  No wonder bankruptcies seem to take forever.    
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