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Working with Kids

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  • LATEST POSTS

    • It was briefly brought up in the Q & A at a Cub recruiting night the first year we enrolled girls in the Cub Scout program.  The most honest answer we could give was that we take the safety and well being of every Scout, male or female, very seriously.  We always do everything in our power to ensure that nothing like this will happen, but the best way for that parent to help us do that would be to register and participate along with his daughter. As to this particular incident, I saw the news reports several days ago.  While I was disheartened to see it happened, I was pleased to see that as soon as it was discovered it was reported to authorities, and the perpetrator was arrested.  As was mentioned earlier in this thread, zero incidents is a laudable goal, but probably not realistic.  There is however, a difference between zero incidents and zero tolerance.  In this case it appears the system worked the way it should have.  Something happened, and as soon as discovered was reported, resulting in an arrest.
    • How is this remotely relevant to scouting? We're talking about kids who are supposed to be in a protected, supervised scout camp operating under the gold standard of youth protection in 2021.  The more interesting question to me is how did this person manage to set up the camera. Didn't anyone notice there was an adult hanging out in the kids bathroom or during kids hours? And the really dismaying part, according to other accounts I have read, is that he recorded scouts engaging in sexual activity in the bathroom. What parent will want to send their kid to that kind of camp?  
    • Is that a new Scouting location? College Dorm High Adventure Base? I don’t recall a YPT or Scout Oath and Law associated with my university experience. As awful as that is, it is not what we’re talking about... Dorm, homes, whatever.
    • No   BSA has been coasting on that perception for decades and that's why so many COs never thought twice about signing that recharter agreement that the nice scout person brought to them once a year. The bankruptcy case, depending on what happens with the COs, really has the potential to completely change that.    If BSA had taken a fraction of what it spent on Summit and invested it in becoming the Mossad of Youth Protection, we likely wouldn't be here today. They had the data. They had the money. They had the opportunity and compelling need but chose to focus elsewhere. 
    • Are they safer without camp?  After-the-fact individual case-by-case basis, yes.  If you know in advance that a specific person will be abused, they are better off at home and not at camp.  If you look at total numbers?  Would the total number be less?  I'm not sure.  Most common abuser is a direct relative.  After that, the abuser usually knows the victim in some context (neighbor, co-worker, coach, teacher, etc).  In addition, other dangers exist as youth look for ways to spend their time.  I'm aware of too many youth our city has buried because they made fatal mistakes in their spare time.  Related, camp teaches youth about their own mortality.  Survive a big thunderstorm.  Bang your head on a tree.  etc, etc.   It seems experienced scouts, tend to push the limits less.  (but that could be my biased view) I just don't accept the argument that youth would be safer without camp.  
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