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MattR

Setting the tone with a new CSE

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My hunch:  Mr. Mosby is saving his first big memo for the bankruptcy announcement.  Probably on the advice of "commissioned BSA professionals" and other counsel.

If that's the case, I don't agree with it.  When he took the helm, he could at least said "thanks" to everyone and "keep the faith." 

Edited by desertrat77
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6 hours ago, ianwilkins said:

I've been called a member a few times so, for info...

We don't use the term key three. Not sure we have that concept at any level, it's certainly not named as such.

I mean, they are the head honchos, you're right in that, though interestingly of the three only Matt Hyde is in a salaried role, the other two are volunteers and only get paid expenses. Bear's role is mostly ceremonial and promotional, glad-handing, dropping in on scout camps, making pronouncements about scouting that the press are less likely to ignore (because it's Bear) etc etc.

 

This may be a bit rough, but...

Why are our key 3 all retirement age and UK’s head honchos look to be in the prime of their careers?

Just one example... Check Twitter... Our new CSE is the only one that seems to have an account and he has 11 followers and one tweet in 2013 about a car accident.

Bear Grylls ... very active on Twitter with 1.4 million followers

Matt Hyde... 8,000 plus followers, active on Twitter 

Tim Kidd... 7,000 plus followers, active

Twitter is just one way I would expect BSA leaders (as individuals) to connect with parents and youth today.  Instead, BSA is run by the individuals that do not know how to connect to scouts in this generation and they send out their messages is website newsletters that probably never reach the youth.

Where is our energetic leaders, out there making news, taking charge of engaging youth and local volunteers? Where is the aggressive media arm retweeting the great work of scouts? I see good work out of Bryan... perhaps he should be one of our key 3 (he has over 5,000 followers on Twitter).

I question if they really do know millennials (parents) and gen z (scouts) or if they are just relying on surveys.

The absence of any communication from our new leader is sad.

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26 minutes ago, Eagle1993 said:

This may be a bit rough, but...

Why are our key 3 all retirement age and UK’s head honchos look to be in the prime of their careers?

Just one example... Check Twitter... Our new CSE is the only one that seems to have an account and he has 11 followers and one tweet in 2013 about a car accident.

Bear Grylls ... very active on Twitter with 1.4 million followers

Matt Hyde... 8,000 plus followers, active on Twitter 

Tim Kidd... 7,000 plus followers, active

Twitter is just one way I would expect BSA leaders (as individuals) to connect with parents and youth today.  Instead, BSA is run by the individuals that do not know how to connect to scouts in this generation and they send out their messages is website newsletters that probably never reach the youth.

Where is our energetic leaders, out there making news, taking charge of engaging youth and local volunteers? Where is the aggressive media arm retweeting the great work of scouts? I see good work out of Bryan... perhaps he should be one of our key 3 (he has over 5,000 followers on Twitter).

I question if they really do know millennials (parents) and gen z (scouts) or if they are just relying on surveys.

The absence of any communication from our new leader is sad.

It's not rough, it's accurate and it's part of the problem. In our unit, parents no longer pay by check but online, they use social media, text rather than email, want apps for everything, and won't pay for some of the more obvious BSA merchandising. There's no patience for the kind of happy chaos that has been scouts. Families are tightly scheduled and need to know what they are doing 6 months or at least 3 months out. We've got to have leaders that understand these challenges or we won't see membership growth. 

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I sincerely wish Mr. Mosby the best.  Our country and world need for Scouting to be strong and vibrant.  

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5 hours ago, ALongWalk said:

I sincerely wish Mr. Mosby the best.  Our country and world need for Scouting to be strong and vibrant.  

I think you are overstating it a bit.  Scouting doesn't really have all that much of an impact.  

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And that is part of the sadness.  In today's egocentric and non-reflective society, the basis of the program could help balance the problems.  That is why we DO need the program, but with the proper focus and attention to the foundational standards.

 

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1 hour ago, David CO said:

I think you are overstating it a bit.  Scouting doesn't really have all that much of an impact.  

Oh, I believe that Scouts change the world.  Usually not by big dramatic actions (though we did have a bit of a heyday with that space program thing back in the 60s), but little bit by little bit over months and years and decades.  If only one percent of Scouts currently in the program take the Scout Oath and Scout Law to heart, that's 20,000 American youth who will grow up opening doors for people carrying packages, and standing at attention when the Star-Spangled Banner is played at ball games, and contributing to flood relief, and doing CPR when a stranger collapses on the street, and voting, and teaching their platoon members how to set up tents on a rainy field exercise in basic training, and dealing honestly with their customers, and serving on the HOA board, and shuffling around the care home greeting everyone and cracking jokes and taking time for the residents who have no family.  Sure, maybe they would be inclined to do those things anyway.  But one of the great things about Scouting is that it not only gives youth a code, it gives them lots of opportunities to practice.

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19 hours ago, dkurtenbach said:

I think you are overstating it a bit.  Scouting doesn't really have all that much of an impact.  

"" Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it's the only thing that ever has. ""

                                                                                                                                     =  Margaret Mead  =

 

 

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