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packsaddle

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Everything posted by packsaddle

  1. packsaddle

    BSA mile swim

    That is a really good precautionary consideration. I know many of those lake well and even at lower elevation some of them could threaten hypothermia if care isn't taken.
  2. packsaddle

    Fitness Goals for Scouters

    When I take groups on day hikes or backpacking, if their preparedness is unknown I start with some 'creampuffs' and then progress toward the real deal. I confess that I was greatly heartened a couple of years ago when I overheard one of the hikers on the phone to mom, "Mom, I just got my ass kicked by a 67-year-old heart patient". Right on! They did just fine after that.
  3. packsaddle

    Scouting for Food - checking expiration dates?

    At our local food banks they cull anything that is beyond expiration without exception. It must be a standard that is applied differently other places.
  4. packsaddle

    Scouting for Food - checking expiration dates?

    We do the same thing as quazse's unit. I think the council abandoned the door-to-door approach for a variety of reasons including this.
  5. packsaddle

    New girls in Scouting

    We had plenty of female leaders even without girls in the pack and troop. My only complaint was that one of them couldn't stop herself from calling these young men 'sweetie' or 'honey' or things like that. She sure as heck never graced me with one of those appellations! Anyway, the person in Ranman328's anecdote is unlikely to affect policy by complaining to a clerk. I suspect those clerks get plenty of venting of all kinds as they peddle their wares.
  6. packsaddle

    Contagious Disease Outbreaks

    I was a member of that first wave of recipients of the polio vaccine. Then shortly later, the Sabin vaccine. At school everyone got the Sabin vaccine. I remember it well. We all lined up and walked past the nurse who administered the dose. There was no choice and you had to be apocalyptically stupid to reject this somehow. The Salk vaccine was given at the public health department and I remember being taken there along with my sister. I had an aunt who contracted polio as an adult, and a friend in high school whose family had rejected it...and he was permanently handicapped from the disease. It was another case of the child paying the price for the stupid decision by parents. I always get my flu shot. And I have a very disparaging view of the anti-vax bunch. What they really are is 'anti-science'. That said, I suspect that summer camp has a much greater risk for something like norovirus than flu or measles. But that could be the result of residual herd immunity and that can change fairly quickly if the population doesn't maintain its vigilance against these things.
  7. packsaddle

    Crawfish

    The 'hunger factor' is also important. But those things are sure good. Did they suck the heads?
  8. packsaddle

    Qualities of an Eagle

    Oops, sorry for that misread. No excuse. I also ended up with great MiL AND FiL as well - but from a different decision-making process.
  9. packsaddle

    Qualities of an Eagle

    WisconsinMomma, I'm just trying to be helpful here but the post by quazse is still there, I think, on Wednesday at 11:34 am (at least according to the time stamp on my computer). Here it is: "Speaking of "less developed countries" my father-in-law first noticed my mother-in-law while they were tending crops in the hinterlands of western PA. He saw her work-ethic and thought, "She'll do." Demean the "help-mate" criteria all you want, but to this day, I am reaping the benefits of that union." When I read this the first time I realized that it could be taken a number of different ways and at least one of those would not be good....as you have noted. Please remember, that was his grandfather and not him. The 'benefit' he mentioned was likely being brought into this world. As he indicated, these forums are not always successful at conveying intent or tone and can easily go 'south', even when it was not intended.
  10. LOL, deeeelish! Similar to our regional 'livermush' which I can sheepishly admit to scarfing down in large quantities, fried....when much younger....before I knew what was in it. Goetta is better but my fav is, naturally, crawfish or gator boudin, neither of which I can find locally. The cuisine of Louisiana is just wonderful. And now, that I'm really hungry, I will retire to the kitchen.
  11. LOL, That's just wonderful. How have I missed this? I'll check it out. Edit: nevermind, I know how I've missed this. The South. Kosher doesn't count for much here. That would be wasted on folks used to eating ears, noses, and tails (and that higher authority only knows what else!)
  12. packsaddle

    Qualities of an Eagle

    And today, that guy would be in clear violation of Title IX, and if some administrator had been looking for a reason to replace him he'd be out on his ear. I promise my students a safe learning environment. I also inform them that I do NOT promise them a 'comfortable' one.
  13. SSScout, I'm curious about that Hebrew National hot dog commercial. Is it online anywhere?
  14. packsaddle

    New girls in Scouting

    Nevermind, I just figured it out.
  15. packsaddle

    New girls in Scouting

    Eagle94-A1, I wouldn't know the answer to your question as it is not my field. I looked at that paper through the eyes of a journal editor, not as a neurophysiologist. Sorry, wish I could help more. The one thing I feel safe in saying is that in another 5 years, things will likely have changed greatly. What we have done in the recent past may look primitive in comparison.
  16. packsaddle

    New girls in Scouting

    WITW, So I took a look at those two references out of curiosity. So The Telegraph article basically is an opinion piece based on scientific articles that are not obviously referenced. The actual scientific article that you gave a link to is dated 2015 while The Telegraph article is dated 2013 which makes me think the scientific article is not the same one referenced by the newspaper. But as the conclusions are probably similar and perhaps better supported by the article in Cerebral Cortex, this difference is probably ok. In the Cerebral Cortex article I was struck by the similarity of the analysis to ecological studies that rely heavily on statistical inference. Their data consist of measurements made using tomography and tractography which produces images of the structure of 'slices' through living tissues, in this case brains. Physical measurements of size and position are possible and inferences of connections of different types are also possible. All of this data is then analyzed using, in this case, some basic statistical methods. They relied on a public database of these images and data for their analyses. We are all potentially susceptible to what we seem to term 'confirmation bias'. If there is anyone in these forums who hasn't thought, or heard, the generality that female humans seem to mature more quickly than males, with respect to cognitive development as well as other characteristics, then that person has just not been very aware of their surroundings. In education circles, this is a central assumption, mostly based on empirical observations of the actual behaviors of children at different ages. I am wearing my 'skeptic hat' right now so here is what I think about that article: The authors may be influenced by the 'background' notion that there is a difference. They went looking for it and, wonder of wonders, found it. What did we learn that K-12 teachers don't already know? Look at the results. Figure 4, for example, is a map of the resulting differences in their version of the connections. These 'maps' show what? That there is a difference. If anyone thinks these maps are going to become something that we use to make predictions about behavior in the future or how to 'control' it, that is indeed a 'stretch'. Figure 5 is totally reminiscent of ecological data because while those regression lines are significant, a casual glance at the scatter of the data indicates that those lines have virtually no predictive power whatsoever. And then these results are employed in creating sweeping 'models' (Figure 7) that look like we have actually mastered the questions of what it all means. LOL, and we certainly haven't, I assure you. I was unable to find in the article the words 'hypothesis' or 'experiment'. I was unable to find conditional statements such as, 'if this is true then we should find the following' or 'if this is not true then we should observe the following'. These kinds inquiring statements may be implied but they are not stated and as such, it seems that the authors make the assumption that differences may exist and then they look for them...and find them. All that is just fine except....what do we know as a result of all that, that we didn't already 'know' and use in educational practice? My answer to that last question is: not much, if anything. It basically confirms what we already think is there, provides virtually no predictive capacity that we don't already have, and is likely (the absence of pagination suggests an online journal format) to be quickly forgotten as (hopefully) we progress, some day in the future, to a level of real understanding of 'what makes us tick'. This paper makes me think that perhaps we actually haven't progressed all that farther along from employing concepts like 'humors' to explain things. But thanks for the link. At least it's nice to see what passes as 'state of the art'.
  17. packsaddle

    New girls in Scouting

    Riding a hatchet? Ouch! 😂
  18. packsaddle

    Qualities of an Eagle

    MattR, your comment regarding cheating resonates with me because these patterns of deception seem to become established when quite young (and perhaps they're innate, I don't know) but I see many examples of even older young people (not a typo) in my classes. And they seem to have a different understanding of what 'honesty' is from what I think and was taught. You can see some of this in the way that so-called votes are given during these so-called talent shows after which text messages are used to tally the vote. Evidently it is common to allow multiple 'votes' from each 'voter' if they want to take the time and expense to do it. While I couldn't care less about what happens on one of those vapid wastes of time, the 'anything goes' idea seems to fix itself into their other activities as well. So I spend considerable time and effort in defeating these things when it comes time for assessment. And, once again, I suspect that if the monkeys were intelligent enough to engage in the same behavior, they would. My point, then, is that whatever we can do to give them the tools for making fewer risky or harmful decisions will make things much better in the long run. The Eagle father-to-be, I hope, will take his responsibilities as a father seriously and I also hope that his adult peers can offer help and support to make sure his mistake doesn't harm a person who had no choice whatsoever on how to enter this world.
  19. packsaddle

    New girls in Scouting

    sst3rd, I'm evidence that 'old' doesn't preclude acceptance (or even embracing) change. Things change. Live long enough and you learn that if you don't adapt you risk getting left behind.
  20. packsaddle

    New girls in Scouting

    Could be they don't think it's needed, or any other of numerous other possible reasons. Actually, I think patrol method would continue to work right up through college if we gave it a try. The young males I see of that age group, for the most part, could sure use some of those skills. But being coed or not seems irrelevant to the potential benefits of patrol method. What do you think IS the relevance? I agree with your sentiment about adult led units. I simply think that not much would change one way or the other with coed status.
  21. packsaddle

    New girls in Scouting

    The explorer posts were, as far as I could tell, almost completely run by the explorers, not the adults. The young women seemed to be more organized and exhibited greater leadership than the young men. I reject the notion that adults have to run these units for them to be successful.
  22. packsaddle

    New girls in Scouting

    LOL, I suspect that there will be little chance that a bunch of scouts will see how fast they can hurtle down a steep hill riding on a propane stove or hatchet.
  23. packsaddle

    New girls in Scouting

    If our social interactions somehow determine that coed is what most of people want, then I agree. Under that situation coed is almost inevitable in time, and maybe sooner than some of us would like. Personally, I like the idea. Before these changes I heard a lot of 'wishing' from scout parents that daughters could join in with the boys as scouts, and complaints about them being excluded. My daughter felt the pain of the exclusion so I sympathized with those other parents. I've seen no problems in the explorer units I've interacted with in the past. I see no reason it won't work just as well for younger folks. Camels, OTOH, I don't much care for.
  24. packsaddle

    Hello......again

    I have to admit that I was completely surprised when my son (an Eagle) who now lives in a location where Scouting is not very visible...announced that #1 grandson was joining the Cubs. So I dragged out my old uniform and stuff and started thinking about how I could help. This boy is a perfect match for Scouts and I'm hoping he'll stick with it. A lot depends on those first experiences and, of course, some kind of instant gratification, lol. He lusts after the status of being allowed to own and use a pocketknife and eager to master the skill and responsibility that comes with it. Game on! Anyway, it looks like I'm back after I thought it was over (quite literally, due to a close call with a heart surgeon). The Forums have evolved since I became inactive and since I feel like I'm entering for the first time, I decided to break the news here. See you 'round. Packsaddle
  25. packsaddle

    Hello......again

    Another test post.
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