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Questions and answers for parents and leaders new to Scouting.

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  2. BSA Scout Spirit Boards

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  3. Denner cords~who pays?

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  • LATEST POSTS

    • Very proud, indeed! 😎 Kudu Flaming Fry Pan Patrol Very proud, indeed! 😎 Kudu Flaming Fry Pan Patrol
    • Hi ! The first thing I remember until now is a card game based on GWENT fully made by my friend . Instead of heroes, he put us there, our descriptions, quotes and pictures which he drew It was great fun throughout the all summer camp  .I highly recommend making cards with your own hands Just like you I realy like to wear good socks . Many choose socks inaccurately they take ordinary because they can be destroyed  . But the important thing is that you need to find those that will not be destroyed and are adapted to the expeditions  It seems to me that taking a hammock is a good idea if only there is one which is the right size .Usually during the day, which is often exhausting at the camp it is worth taking a rest for a moment with a good book and some drink is really nice          
    • So last weekend I was on camp with my merry band of men and women and by the end of it two particular scouts had caught my attention, both for very different reasons. Both present things that need a little attention, and I have my ideas about what to do with both of them, but I thought I would see what the collective wisdom of this esteemed forum would through up. In both cases I was already aware of the issues but a weekend on camp really shone a light on them. Just as a reminder our scout section in the UK runs 10-14 year olds so the troop is generally younger, worth remembering for dealing with things!
      Scout number 1. 13 year old, female patrol leader. Quietly spoken. Genuinely nice kid. Been all the way through from a 6 year old beaver. Got made a PL at Easter on the recommendation of the PLs council. She's very competent, can look after herself, knows what she and everyone else needs to be doing. Has an absolute heart of gold. Trouble is that she find telling other people what to do very difficult. She's not making the classic new PL mistake of thinking that she needs to do it all herself, she knows she shouldn't be, it's just that she has told me she finds it awkward telling other people what they should be doing.

      I have some ideas about how to help her do that (bearing in mind she's a 13 year old and not a cadet at Sandhurst!) but thought I'd forage elsewhere.

      Scout number 2. Also 13 years old, but there the similarity ends. He's the total polar opposite of scout 1. Came into scouts aged 12, quite a gob on him. His problem is he's very much "me, me, me." He wants to do everything, but doesn't want to put the work in. On camp it was him doing the moaning when they were walking up from the station to the campsite, him that kept dodging his chores, him that had to be told multiple times by his PL and by me to do anything. Basically zero work ethic, zero team ethic. And the problem is we're now in a viscious circle, because he's annoyed the other kids and he's starting to get pushed out the gang. I tried having a word in his shell, explaining that he was winding up the other kids, but it didn't seem to sink in. When he did (briefly) pull his weight, he looked at me for approval, not the rest of the troop. He kind of missed the point.

      Again, I have some ideas on how to tackle this but thought I'd see what you chaps think as well.

      Actually one similarity between them, scout 1's dad is group treasurer, scout 2's mum is a troop assistant (essentially a regular parent helper).
    • Though IOLS and BALOO cover many similar topics, if they are done properly they are not almost identical.  They are (should be) very different in the depth of the information and in the approach.  BALOO is training for Cub Scout adults to plan and carry out a pack/family campout.  While IOLS is about the Scout leaders being able to guide their Scouts in planning and carrying out a patrol campout.  Part of the learning for Scout leaders should be for them to have an experience similar to what their new Scouts will have - being part of a patrol, with people you may or may not know, learning the new skills (and maybe struggling with them a bit), choosing their own campsite, setting up camp, planning and preparing their own meals, doing all this under the "supervision" of a Troop Guide.  AND - the level of camping skills and the camping rules are quite different between Cubs and Scouts. In my council, we run IOLS and BALOO concurrently but the only thing we overlap is campfire program and cracker barrel.  
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