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rickmay

parent rank pins

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Nice to see we're getting back to splitting hairs over semantics. The fact is, if your scouts and the scouts of some other troop wanted to compete for whose scoutmasters scored highest on uniform inspection, and they asked me or TLS  to judge, we'd dock points for "flair" just like we'd expect someone to dock us.

Now, for each parent who actually does wear those pins at work/church/gym/bar, I might give points back ... :D

We are all victims of De La Renta's third-world-general look. The fact that 70 years later "flair" means something to us in the context of uniforming indicates that he wasn't entirely wrong.

Edited by qwazse

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On 9/27/2019 at 3:20 PM, mrkstvns said:

 

Well, Latin Scot, you're right. That's what the policy says, but don't you think that maybe the policy is the MINIMUM amount of Flair we should put on our uniforms?  And maybe some of us might want to express ourselves a little more loudly....

Look at perdidochas over there....he has 37 pieces of Flair on his uniform.

No, I'm not saying you need to add lots of blinking lights and clown emblems to your uniform....unless maybe you feel it lets you be you....

Why do I feel like these discussions of rogue uniform practices always sound so much like Jennifer Aniston getting a lecture about her "Flair" in the 90s flick, "Office Space"...

 

Actually, the only flair I have is the two Eagle Dad pins, and the three Eagle Mentor pins (and sometimes a temporary patch, usually a Camporee patch). 

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2 minutes ago, perdidochas said:

Actually, the only flair I have is the two Eagle Dad pins, and the three Eagle Mentor pins (and sometimes a temporary patch, usually a Camporee patch). 

I've been meaning to talk to you about your flair...

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For the record BSA supply stopped selling those Parent Ribbons a number of years ago and replaced it with a large leather necklace which cost twice as much as the ribbons.  I've never seen anyone wearing these.  Please bring back the Ribbons.  

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15 hours ago, reeddma said:

For the record BSA supply stopped selling those Parent Ribbons a number of years ago and replaced it with a large leather necklace which cost twice as much as the ribbons.  I've never seen anyone wearing these.  Please bring back the Ribbons.  

We recently cleaned out our storage unit and I finally found my jewelry box which disappeared when we moved. While I had been hoping to find my wedding ring within, alas, that is still missing - but I found something far more valuable: My Proud Parent ribbon full of Parent Pins from Tiger to Life. ❤️ It went a long way toward making me feel better about the idea that I'll never see my wedding ring again... 

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19 hours ago, reeddma said:

For the record BSA supply stopped selling those Parent Ribbons a number of years ago and replaced it with a large leather necklace which cost twice as much as the ribbons.  I've never seen anyone wearing these.  Please bring back the Ribbons.  

Back in the day, we used green ribbon and a straight pin for the Mothers' Pins as they were called.

I personally despise the new necklaces as they are designed for Cub Scouts and Scouts, BSA. I am sorry but it is two distinct programs. The two programs need their own ribbons/necklaces.

On a uniform note, There is no prohibition on wearing the necklace with the uniform. Although I still think the leather rounder temp patch with the mentor and parents pin is better.

 

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I think that there are many better places to wear that parent pin.  When you are in uniform everyone knows that you are supportive of your daughter, the Scout. What about when you aren't in uniform? How do you express it then? 

My dad was an ASM the entire time I was a scout. He later was SM for many years after I was gone.  I never felt like he didn't support me because he didn't wear a pin on his uniform.  I was super proud when he had his pin on at church or work though. 

Lastly, I would ask that you think about your role when you are in uniform.  When you are in uniform you are not being dad, you are being a Scouter.  I strongly believe that it would serve your daughter best if she was one of your scouts while you were in uniform.  It is a struggle that all scouter dads (and moms) deal with.

Proper uniforming has a purpose, and these discussions turn into the same thing pretty much every time, but I don't think we should pick and choose which uniform guidelines we follow and which ones we ignore. 

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