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WolfDenRulz

How realistic is it for a Cub Scout to earn everything?

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Everything? like Nova, recruiter, emergency prep, interpreter?

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I've known a cub scout or two who earned every typical achievement. At times they were called arrow-points. Now they are adventure loops. The current list as mapped out here seems within reach of an extremely active cub.

I estimate that there'll be one in every pack every couple of years.

The other awards that @TMSM mentions are rarely earned in their own right.

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My Wolf den this past year completed 10 adventures, out of the 19 available. We met for den meetings once per month and asked scouts to complete some requirements at home in between meetings. Usually just one or two requirements, or one project for the relevant adventure.

With a pretty light meeting schedule we knocked off half of the belt loops. I have no doubt that doing all 19 is entirely feasible, and honestly not all that difficult. I've heard leaders say that a den would have to meet weekly to do all of the adventures in the book, but I don't believe that to be true.

On top of the 10 we completed as a den, some scouts did additional adventures on their own with parents, some as many as 3 additional adventures. So again, with a pretty light schedule, we have scouts who completed as many as 13 adventures out of 19.

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I think it depends on how you define "everything".  If you mean all adventures for a particular den level, then I think it's very realistic.  If you mean all adventures plus all other awards for a den level, then it becomes much more difficult.

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Not very realistic or desirable in my opinion. I considered this for my own sons, but after two years found that they are somewhat neutral to earning belt loops/pins. As long as they get to participate in recognition events, they seem happy. They would rather run around playing tag on the playground with their den than doing an adult led activity for the sake of earning an elective. It turns out that earning electives was more important to me than it was for them. Another hint for me was that only one other scout in my den completed any of the optional electives on their own, although I encouraged parents and the kids to look in the book and find something that interested them or attend electives at the council center. I even put up the advancement chart at several den meetings so they could put stickers on the new electives they completed. I now find it more valuable to try to repeat certain things with my own boys rather than teach them something new. For example, they "got credit" for tying a square knot and two half-hitches as wolves and bears, but quickly forgot how to do it. So every few months we practice to try to keep these skills fresh. If they can start boy scouts knowing how to setup a tent, tie a few knots, start a fire, cook some food, take care of minor injuries, and work together in a team to plan and implement something (anything) without arguing, I will be a proud dad and den leader. 

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It can happen and has a special patch that says ... "Proud son of a super mom!

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My son earned the "Super Achiever" patch a long time ago for every pin, patch, and even the super nova awards.  He enjoyed it, but it the long run it really doesn't matter other than having decorations in his room.

I think he mostly enjoyed being my assistant when I staffed summer and winter camps.  He liked being the "expert" for the little ones.

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Especially with webelos scouts, one could delay crossover and continue to earn electives for quite a while, but that means they are going on to a troop relatively late. 

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On 7/7/2019 at 8:49 AM, AnotherDad said:

Not very realistic or desirable in my opinion. I considered this for my own sons, but after two years found that they are somewhat neutral to earning belt loops/pins. As long as they get to participate in recognition events, they seem happy. They would rather run around playing tag on the playground with their den than doing an adult led activity for the sake of earning an elective. It turns out that earning electives was more important to me than it was for them. Another hint for me was that only one other scout in my den completed any of the optional electives on their own, although I encouraged parents and the kids to look in the book and find something that interested them or attend electives at the council center. I even put up the advancement chart at several den meetings so they could put stickers on the new electives they completed. I now find it more valuable to try to repeat certain things with my own boys rather than teach them something new. For example, they "got credit" for tying a square knot and two half-hitches as wolves and bears, but quickly forgot how to do it. So every few months we practice to try to keep these skills fresh. If they can start boy scouts knowing how to setup a tent, tie a few knots, start a fire, cook some food, take care of minor injuries, and work together in a team to plan and implement something (anything) without arguing, I will be a proud dad and den leader. 

Someone make this man a den leader.

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On 7/7/2019 at 5:47 PM, malraux said:

Especially with webelos scouts, one could delay crossover and continue to earn electives for quite a while, but that means they are going on to a troop relatively late. 

Strongly discourage waiting, especially when they are chomping at the bit to join Scouts BSA. Youngest made the choice to wait 2 months to Cross Over when his den did. However he was "visiting" the troop for 2 months before joining. He even did his fair share of fundraising.with the troop as a Webelos. 

 

Forgot to add, while having fun and learning stuff during those 2 months, none of it counted towards advancement. Which is not a big deal for him  or me.

Edited by Eagle94-A1

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49 minutes ago, Eagle94-A1 said:

Strongly discourage waiting, especially when they are chomping at the bit to join Scouts BSA. Youngest made the choice to wait 2 months to Cross Over when his den did. However he was "visiting" the troop for 2 months before joining. He even did his fair share of fundraising.with the troop as a Webelos. 

I agree.

First, most boys (girls?) of this age and maturity are more than ready for an advanced maturity program. I believe most Webelos Dens are just coasting their last couple months waiting to get in the troop anyway. Second, the few Dens that do wait a couple of months longer are typically doing it for the adults who want the boys to get more advancement. That advancement a year later will mean almost nothing to the scouts. For those Dens who are waiting, we asked that they send their Scouts to our troop just to get used to being a Scout (even if they hadn't committed to our troop).

I would advise Pack leaders learn the standard crossover timetable for their district so they can help the troops. Late crossovers are a burden on PLCs just trying to place the new scouts in the right patrols, so they can ease the struggle of the change. Troop election cycles can challenge the PLCs just in recruiting and training Troop Guides. I've said before, the BSA looses more scouts in their first year of a troop than any other time. Packs can help a little by fitting into the troop schedules. 

Barry

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On 7/3/2019 at 12:40 PM, TMSM said:

Everything? like Nova, recruiter, emergency prep, interpreter?

yes to all but recruiter and interpreter.

Edited by WolfDenRulz

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On 7/3/2019 at 1:24 PM, FireStone said:

My Wolf den this past year completed 10 adventures, out of the 19 available. We met for den meetings once per month and asked scouts to complete some requirements at home in between meetings. Usually just one or two requirements, or one project for the relevant adventure.

With a pretty light meeting schedule we knocked off half of the belt loops. I have no doubt that doing all 19 is entirely feasible, and honestly not all that difficult. I've heard leaders say that a den would have to meet weekly to do all of the adventures in the book, but I don't believe that to be true.

On top of the 10 we completed as a den, some scouts did additional adventures on their own with parents, some as many as 3 additional adventures. So again, with a pretty light schedule, we have scouts who completed as many as 13 adventures out of 19.

awesome!

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