Jump to content

Working with Kids

Counseling, inspiring and teaching kids.


823 topics in this forum

  1. Just a picky eater? 1 2

    • 26 replies
    • 2.4k views
  2. Another job as a parent

    • 6 replies
    • 971 views
  3. A good Lesson?

    • 4 replies
    • 894 views
    • 15 replies
    • 1.7k views
    • 35 replies
    • 3.2k views
  4. Homesickness

    • 4 replies
    • 952 views
  5. How to stop lying?

    • 7 replies
    • 905 views
    • 28 replies
    • 2.4k views
    • 17 replies
    • 1.5k views
    • 2 replies
    • 869 views
    • 7 replies
    • 967 views
  6. Commitment. 1 2

    • 17 replies
    • 1.5k views
  7. anti-bully project

    • 13 replies
    • 1.3k views
    • 35 replies
    • 3.2k views
    • 28 replies
    • 2.1k views
  • LATEST POSTS

    • The reason I do not use pointers for astronomy is to provide scouts et al better opportunity to appreciate the greater cosmos, and to become a guide themselves and not simply an audience. Imagine using descriptive language and the stars as pointers as the main guide. The purpose is to have viewers not just see a particular object, but see it within the greater cosmos. Also the joy experienced by a new sky viewer when they finally "find" the stellar object themselves. Sooner or later they then begin to describe to others how to find it. This creates a cycle of not just pointing out specific items, but for the participants to begin looking for other objects and guiding others to them as well.
    • Agree with @qwaze on not just automatically giving the Scout rank badge. For us, the very first campout that the AoL crossovers attend with the troop, they can breeze through "reviewing" all of the Scout requirements and most will have no issue with being ready that night to have their SMC and be awarded the rank on Sunday morning. And that is appropriate. For the small number that struggle with a requirement or two, they are not massive issues and the kid can still have their SMC and get encouraged to come to the meting that week and 99.9% of the time they will receive their award that night. We aren't solving some massive crisis of "holding kids up on advancement" if BSA makes this change.
    • Setting aside that I thought turning Scout into a rank was pointless, now that it is a rank ... We had several AoL crossovers who were still struggling with square knots. That's not to disrespect the program. We had a dozen crossovers, about half of them knew their knots well enough to quickly demonstrate them. I think the pandemic was part of the problem. But, also, it's not in the nature of 10-year-olds to retain those kinds of motor skills. Scouts who are camping every month have greater odds of actually needing those skills. No rubber stamps. It's a good life lesson to know that it's not about the patch. You have to be prepared to actually demonstrate the skills you claim to have.
    • If you see that as the point, then please, follow your beliefs and never go into the woods again.  Also, please stop using electricity, because the windmills are killing far more birds... As for me, until something more conclusive than your concoction emerges from scientific study and observation, I'll happily bring out my laser pointer to educate Scouts. Happy Scouting 
    • If, for some reason, you put a few hundred kids in flying monkey suits in the night sky above you, and you knew they were there and unseen in the dark, you wouldn't risk pointing your laser up there during an astronomy lesson, would you? I would think you would want to give their eyes a wide berth. I'm not a Leave No Trace instructor, but I think the whole point of LNT is to universally leave things that are out there in their own habitat unharmed and undisturbed within it as much as possible. At least by scouts.  Googling pretty much confirms that lasers are harmful or at least disruptive to the normal activity of avian wildlife, and used to haze and disperse them; birding experts only use lasers in daylight when they can see what they are doing and know they are not hitting or disturbing anything. If there's any lingering doubt that migrating birds are in the skies at night at high concentrations during certain periods,  consult this web site anytime after March 1: birdcast.info. It's a joint project between CSU and Cornell and uses weather surveillance data, radar, and other tools to issue migration forecasts. You can look at the radar and actually see the density of birds overhead during migration. Somewhere around four billion birds migrate in our portion of the hemisphere spring and fall. You might not see them unless you are looking at a fairly full moon through binoculars, but they are there. They are impossible to miss, in more than one way. 
  • Who's Online (See full list)

×
×
  • Create New...