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DeanRx

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DeanRx last won the day on March 7 2014

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About DeanRx

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    California
  1. DeanRx

    No Fear

    I've read it, have a copy and often recommend it to a few parents.... it makes some great arguements for WHY we have such a heli-parent problem in this country. As someone who works with / employs college aged kids and our SM is a college professor... I can tell you first hand the spill over parenting from the "fear" point of view has in a young adult's life. IMHO - Last Child in the Woods should be mandatory reading for ALL parents of scouts. Dean
  2. DeanRx

    Rush to eagle rank

    I agree with the comment that you can't save a kid from their parents... happens in other youth activities too. I don't know if or what it says to other scouts that actually do the work? Maybe part of their learning process is that life isn't fair. Maybe its understanding that just because another scout wears the same rankas they do (in this case Eagle) - it doesn't always mean the same work was put into the achievement. To me - the Eagle (or any rank for that matter) is a matter of personal pride in the work done to achieve a goal. In scouts, as in life, some people will attain more while doing less for it and others will work their butt off to manage to scrape by. Ultimately, thats a good lesson for youth to take away from scouts too. It would be nice if their was some magic metric that could accurately measure the leadership of a scout. If you can come up with it, you can market it to large corporations and make HUGE money, IMHO. Is the scout who has disorganized meetings, and barely competes as SPL at camporees with a motley crue of 'Bad news Bears' types of scouts any more or less a leader than an SPL that has a high functioning ASPL / PLs and really good "followers" in each of the patrols and basically doesn't have to do much leading or managing because the patrols pretty much run themselves? Which of those SPLs are the better "leader"? Which of those boys "deserves" to be called an Eagle more than the other? Dean
  3. DeanRx

    Raingutter Regatta kits

    They don't really fit a standard raingutter... the boys would have to make the catamarans towards the inside of the rig to fit. However, BSA sells a blow up (mini pool type) raingutter kid that it fits.... its actually worth the trouble to invest in a couple of those for your pack. They are much more stable than a raingutter on a set of saw horses. IMHO
  4. TAHAWK, Sounds like a local problem for you. Just got back from a week of camp as an ASM, I signed a ton of blue cards as did the SM and other ASMs. From what I saw at camp, most of the MB counselors were young, but knew their stuff. WE had several scouts (including my son) who came home from camp with partials either because they failed to complete the prerequisites PRIOR to going to camp, or the camp didn't have time or the correct facilities to complete a given requirement. Swimming was one of those MBs, as the camp was a lake only place and was not deep enough for safe surface or safe dock diving... all scouts in swimming MB got a partial - becuase the lake level was low this year.
  5. DeanRx

    To Protect and SERVE

    Kudos to officer Hurst... Great area and Great council... Schiff , you from there? I grew up in Hastings and spent several summers at Camp Augustine on the Platte River....
  6. DeanRx

    Scouts with severe food allergies

    Do what you are comfortable with. We are all volunteers. There should be no expectation, nor should you assume responsibility, for someone else's child with allergies. We have scouts that are REQUIRED to have an adult family member on outings with them (i.e. Autistic). If you feel comfortable taking on that challenge, by all means do. I am a licensed healthcare provider and if the food allergy is that severe - I'd opt for a famlity member to accompany and they cook their own stuff. I agree with the poster above that speaks of the risk for cross-contamination. We can try to accomodate, but its not mandatory that you take on responsibility for EVERY special situation that arises. Dean
  7. I understand your concern, but in reality the largest risk ANY of us takes on ANY outing is getting in the car and driving to our destination.
  8. DeanRx

    Alcohol

    I agree it is poor form, however - it goes on probably more than you would think. I have attended district and council dinners (adult award / pat me on the back / see my nifty kilt I made to go with my adult scouter wanna-be 3rd world general uniform). Several had scouts (both Eagles and non) in attendance as color guard and buffet servers / busboy type taks. They have had a cash bar at some / others have been 'dry' (non-alcohol) events. Additionally, our council has at least one to two Scouts night at the Padres games.... they serve alcohol at the stadium. Some of the scouters have a beer, others do not. While I think it was ppor form, I don;t see a huge issue with it (even if it was a 'scout function') because presumably every scout there was under the direction / care of his own parent / guardian. Same as at the baseball game. I don;t condone it, but I don't see a big deal about it. The big deal comes in when you have a scouter that is responsible for scouts under his / her care and they choose to consume alcohol. I agree its best to leave the booze alone anytime there is youth around, but you going to a dinner with your family and having a drink is no different than doing so when you go out to a regular restaraunt, IMHO. Beer at summer camp, adults drinking on a unit campout an then driving kids home, I see as a much bigger deal. Its poor form, but in the gray area of G2SS. heck, maybe they should have it for the FOS presentations.... it would make them more bearable, and likely increase the donations Dean
  9. DeanRx

    Frequently Absent Scouts

    "Deserve" the Tiger rank... Hmmm, thats a tricky question. As a CM for 3+ years on a couple of occasions, I had parents (usually a DL or ADL) broach the idea with me that a scout in their den was not active and thus did not participate enough in the den activities to complete the rank requirements, yet the parent of the scout had signed them off. I even had one parent go so far as suggest that to award a scout the rank when everyone "knew" he hadn't completed the requirements "cheapened" the award for the other boys.... Here's the sticky part. In Cub Scouts - the requirements in the book clearly state that the scout "Does their best" to complete the requirement, the parent signs off and the DL records the acheivement. There is NO provision that the scout MUST do the acheivements at a den meeting or with the rest of the den (although that is how a good majority of requirements get done). There is no Scoutmaster conference or Board of Review in Cub Scouts like we have in Boy Scouts to review the acheivements and make sure the scout has mastered the tasks or even actually done them. Its an honor system - if the parent says they did it and the parent is willing to sign-off, then the scout did the requirement - PERIOD. It sucks that some parents would sign off on rank acheivements that their son hasn't done, but that is between the parent and the kid. Any intervention you might try to make as a DL, ADL, or CM would likely fall of deaf ears anyways. Finally, as I told the parent who said I was "cheapening" the award's value for the kids who actually did do the requirements?... Na... they know what its worth to them as they did their acheivements. The only way their son would know for sure is if their son heard it from the parent that so-and-so didn't do all the requirements... I put that bad parent move right up there with the parent that would sign-off when the kid didn't actually do it... so its sort of a stones in glass houses thing to me. Besides, how do you really KNOW the kid didn't do the requirements with his family? To me - this is a case of enjoy this families company when they show up and participate. If they are paying dues and no-show, then its their $ they have wasted. Take pride in what YOUR son has / is doing to earn their rank and pride in knowing no corners were cut in their work towards rank. The rank will mean more to them if they actually worked for it. The scout who's parent is signing off without actually doing the work has a lot larger issues to face at some point in life than a few glossed over Cub Scout acheivements.... be glad your scout is part of the former and not part of the later... it will serve them well in life in the long run. Dean
  10. DeanRx

    Crossing Early

    I would be cautious about crossing early... Do you want your 10.5 year old in there mixing it up with 16-17 y/o? Huge age difference. It makes it a ripe envorionment for being bullied. It might turn him off to Boy Scouts if the troop is off doing things that he is not physically up to doing yet (i.e. 10 mile packpack trip for a 10-11 y/o is pretty demanding). I don;t want to be a sick in the mud, but as an ASM, I tend to agree with your older son's SM. I would advise to find ways to make Web II more exciting (i.e. WEB only den campouts, some more challenging camp activities / etc...) that will prep him for Boy Scouts and keep him interested. An early entry into Boy Scouts can be just as bad as treading water in Webelos... Many boys while ready on paper with the right requirements completed are not physically, nor emotionally ready to take on a sometimes rougher boy-led environment. Unless the troop he will be bridgeing to is not boy led (there are plenty out there that are Web III, IMHO....) - I'd say enjoy Web II. Go on WEB only campouts, give the WEB II's jr leader status in the pack. All these things will get them ready and make them more effective Boy Scouts. One of the worst things that could happen is you put him in early, he gets in over his head and then a parent has to step and "fix" a situation... That is a receipe for disaster. Your son would already be viewed by the other boys as the smallest in the group, then he would have "mommy" or "daddy" fixing things... thats just bad all around. Best to hold him back a little and make sure he is over prepared, than to send him forward, perhaps prematurely, to face challenges he is not ready to tackle. Dean
  11. DeanRx

    Crossing Early

    dang double posts... almost everytime ! Dean
  12. DeanRx

    Late Fees

    We charge $15 / month dues. You can advance pay or go month to month if you choose. However, the last line on ANY permission slip to go on ANY monthly campout or outing is a line to be initalled by the treasurer. It states that the lad is up to date and paid in full for their dues. If not - they cannot go on the campout - period. That solves the problem with being cash poor at time of recharter. They pay installments every month along the year, or they don't get to participate in troop activities. Its a good incentive for the lad to coordinate with their parent to make sure their dues are up to date !
  13. The GOOD reason to create a crew is that one of the easiest ways to keep boys over the age of 14 interested is to have girls over the age of 14 in the program
  14. DeanRx

    Internet policy.

    I don't know if we have a Internet policy for our unit. We do have a website and FB page... mostly to share info and pictures of activities via FB. I have two or three scouts that have friended me via FB. I accepted their request. I would not seek out or send a friend request to a scout (for reasons other posters have stated). I don't see a problem with it. FB is MUCH more transparent and retrievable than a private e-mail or phone call (both of which I have routinely with scouts as an ASM and MBC to set up meetings / classes / SM conferences / Etc). I don't see how this is a YPT issue at all. First of all, its retrievable. Secondly, we have 'private' conversations with scouts all the time, albiet inthe same room as other scouts / scouters, but out of earshot. Am I to request a scout have his parent on the other line when they call me to set up a meeting time for SM conference or a MB review for sign off? I have had phone conversations, text messages, e-mails, and FB posts from scouts. How is any of them different from another? I guess one could be concerned with someone "grooming" a potential victim via such methods, but you can't molest someone over the internet and a pedophile would have to be a special kind of stupid to interact with a youth in a manner that can be tracked / traced / reproduced from a 3rd party ISP. Seems like much ado about nothing to me...
  15. DeanRx

    Tough Choices to be made for BOR

    Sounds like you guys handled the situation well. As to where the lad is picking this stuff up? Youtube or a porn site? Hmmmm, maybe. I'd venture to guess its a little closer to home. Does this lad or any of his close friends have an older brother? One say in late high school or early college? Good bet he picked it up from a slightly older male aquantance that he views as being "cool", thus imitates the behavoir to seem "cool" too. In our troop, I can almost without exception tell you which boys have older siblings (especially older brothers) and who has younger siblings. Thos with older sibs know more about sex, more about drugs, and have to be reminded more often to watch their language than those who are the eldest child in the house or are an only child. Simple fact, a younger sibling often grows up faster and is more "worldly" than his average peer. Not a hard and fast rule, but more often than not, this holds true. YouTube, they can only find so much sex ed stuff... Youtube does a pretty good job of policing itself. A porn site - not sure what he would get from this. Unless his FB posts had him talking about sex acts / things a 12 y/o should have no knowledge about - I doubt he has found that corner of cyber-space yet. If its who was "hot" or who had the best "body part" lists... sounds like an older sibling / friend thing to me. IMHO As an aside - this is a very good lesson for the lad to learn. Today it was just a BOR for scouts... what happens in a few years when a potential employer sees his FB activity of years past. Or, the father of the girl he really loves? Nothing really ever goes away completely in the digital age. Glad I was 12 y/o in the 1980's - no digital copy of every stupid thing I ever did exists Sounds like you guys handled the situation well. As to where the lad is picking this stuff up? Youtube or a porn site? Hmmmm, maybe. I'd venture to guess its a little closer to home. Does this lad or any of his close friends have an older brother? One say in late high school or early college? Good bet he picked it up from a slightly older male aquantance that he views as being "cool", thus imitates the behavoir to seem "cool" too. In our troop, I can almost without exception tell you which boys have older siblings (especially older brothers) and who has younger siblings. Thos with older sibs know more about sex, more about drugs, and have to be reminded more often to watch their language than those who are the eldest child in the house or are an only child. Simple fact, a younger sibling often grows up faster and is more "worldly" than his average peer. Not a hard and fast rule, but more often than not, this holds true. YouTube, they can only find so much sex ed stuff... Youtube does a pretty good job of policing itself. A porn site - not sure what he would get from this. Unless his FB posts had him talking about sex acts / things a 12 y/o should have no knowledge about - I doubt he has found that corner of cyber-space yet. If its who was "hot" or who had the best "body part" lists... sounds like an older sibling / friend thing to me. IMHO As an aside - this is a very good lesson for the lad to learn. Today it was just a BOR for scouts... what happens in a few years when a potential employer sees his FB activity of years past. Or, the father of the girl he really loves? Nothing really ever goes away completely in the digital age. Glad I was 12 y/o in the 1980's - no digital copy of every stupid thing I ever did exists
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