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Questions and answers for parents and leaders new to Scouting.

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  1. wolf without leader

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  2. Who is responsible?

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  3. It's been a long time...

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  4. Executive Officer?

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  5. Cub Scout Den Leader

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  6. How do you join Scouting?

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  7. Handling pack money?

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  • LATEST POSTS

    • Not sure if this is related, but I have a really nice axe and they explicitly said don't use a sledge hammer to push the head in further as the sidewalls of the head could split. That's also my half axe, so not sure if their full axe is not built with thicker walls.
    • I would hope that most scouts on a winter camping trip would dismantle their snow shelters when breaking camp.  Isn't this SOP for your guys?
    • Taught Paul Bunyan.  Heated our home with firewood for 35 years. Splitting:  Aim for the checks in the log, where the grain has already started to naturally separate.  Don't use an axe on anything bigger than 8 inches, use a maul or a wedge. If your axe becomes stuck in a log, turn it over and swing the combined axe/log down onto your stump, axehead first to get more penetration.  (Does not work with double bladed axes...) Plan the arc of your swing to end at the top of your stump, not the top of your target log. (You were planning to split the log completely on half, right?)   On really large diameter rounds (24 inches and up) don't start in the middle; split small pies out of the edges and work your way in. Avoid sweet gum, the grain is too twisted to split.  Poplar is a very straight grained wood and flies apart when threatened with an axe.  Oak makes the best firewood.  Frozen wood is brittle and splits more easily. When chipping out notches or felling, start your notch at least as wide as the log diameter; angle your slices in at 45 degrees; and twist the embedded axe to flip out the plate sized chips.  Don't waste your energy swinging directly into a log at 90 degrees. The wood fibers compress onto the blade and hinder penetration.  Angling in at 45 degrees allows the wood fiber to expand out of the cut away from the blade, and results in a deeper cut. (A straight line is not the easiest distance through a log)  A sharp axe cuts twice as deep as a dull hammer, and makes your work easier.  Cutting on the ground results in rock gouges on your blade and turns a sharp axe into hammer. Section logs 24 inches on straight grain pieces; cut as close to major branches as possible to make splitting easier on gnarly grains.  When using a crosscut saw, always PULL; never push.  Work on your rhythm with you partner.
    • I think that's a terrible idea.  Your typical U.S. scoutmaster has absolutely *NO* idea what is the proper pronunciation of the word "GOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOL !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!"
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