Jump to content
ham_solo

Unoffical end of neck slides

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

Notice how national in all the press photos lately is now having everyone tie their neckers at the bottom like the rest of the world scouting does instead of using a slide, and they are all wearing the longer traditional style neckers.  

 

eg: https://blog.scoutingmagazine.org/2020/03/05/on-the-100th-year-since-the-19th-amendment-lets-look-how-scouts-stood-with-suffragists/

 

I am all for it, I like larger necker sizes, and it really makes US Scouts more in line with the rest of the scouts in the world.

But it does seem interesting that national seems to have made that uniform decision to set that as a new standard and not even communicated it to anyone(like usual).

WhiteHouse.jpg

Edited by ham_solo
  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love this. Glad this seems to be gaining more traction. Slides are awful, especially the metal ones the BSA sells.

  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The "Scout Me In" neckerchief is too thick to be worn with a standard slide. That's why the unofficial policy has been to use a Friendship knot.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll admit I am ... not a fan. I love larger neckerchiefs, don't get me wrong (and being a slightly-built fellow, most neckers are large on me), but this trend towards the 'friendship knot' is honestly rather silly-looking if you ask me (not that anybody has, but I'm answering anyway).

Part of the reason we use slides or slipknots is so that, in an emergency, the neckerchief can be whipped right off and used as needed. It's the very practicality of the neckerchief as an emergency tool and garment that makes it so important and and demonstrative of utilitarian Scouting values. Taking the time to undo a fancy knot like that seems like the very antithesis of that intent - a Scout should be able to snap off his neckerchief to use as a first aid or emergency item in half a second, and that kind of knot would take forever to undo (especially if wet). Slides are also long-used, venerated tokens of Scouting, and I cannot imagine them disappearing any time soon. I love my little collection of slides, gathered from every era of Scouting, each with a story to tell. Furthermore, from a purely aesthetic, sartorially subjective point of view, it's simply a less attractive way to wear the necker, so I'm simply going to respectfully ignore it and hope that it's merely a passing fad. I myself shall continue to encourage the wearing of the neckerchief as outlined in the current Guide to Awards and Insignia.

Of course, I've only been at this for a few years as a leader - mayhaps some of the more experienced Scouters here would opine differently. But I am not pleased with this recent fad myself.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It seems many of the ladies like the style. OK, I'm shaking my head in wonder.

I miss Boy Scouts.

Barry

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The metal slides are a safety hazard because they can fall off and into things. We have been at outings where we have been told by the venue to leave them home or take them off on site for this reason. They are also a continual source of revenue for BSA because many cubs can't seem to hang on to them for more than a few meetings and they are another piece of the cub uniform that unnecessarily drives up expense.  It's not thrifty. I'm all in favor of dispensing with them. There's a para cord version my son made and he wears that as a scout if he feels he needs a slide.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Love that slides can (and should, IMO) be made by Scouts.  Scouts who make their own slides tend to guard them more carefully.  If it gets dropped, everyone pretty much knows whose it is :)

"Handicraft slides made by youth may also be worn." G2A&I

 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First and foremost, the necker was a tool, and it was taught that it served purpose as a sling for first aid.  The standard BSA neckers sold by NS are smaller than they are in many other parts of the world.  For most teens, and especially adults, it would be unusable for that.  I am solidly behind letting the necker be of a larger size, and wearing it in the fashion that many other scouts around the world wear it.  

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Neckers are not required at all, if I understand.  It is an option.  Many units have a formal and field (dare I use that term) necker, the formal one for COH and such, and the informal basic and larger for actual use int the outdoors and so on.

Related to this thread; who remembers the old BL column that encouraged making slides?  Years ago, I think it was at the 85 jambo, I saw a Scouter with a full collection of all the BL slides, most that he made himself.  Coo.

My favorites are one from the 1960 jambo with the patriotic scene, and the first non-official slide I got, a white fdl with a red rose, for attending the 1955 Rosebowl Scout circus.  I need to gather all the mass of miscellany and make a display.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well at least they are wearing neckers and even a few correctly over the collar. :)

I like the knot, as when you need to use your functional necker, you will not worry about losing the slide. 

My $0.02,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, InquisitiveScouter said:

Love that slides can (and should, IMO) be made by Scouts.  Scouts who make their own slides tend to guard them more carefully.  If it gets dropped, everyone pretty much knows whose it is :)

"Handicraft slides made by youth may also be worn." G2A&I

 

A cord or thong, worn like the Wood Badge beads, prevents the slide from coming off and provides a bit of cordage.

 

Yup, all those foreign degenerates and their knoted neckers. worn over the collar  😁

TgEINhV.png

 

Edited by TAHAWK
  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tend to lean on the slides and not the end knot.  The loose ends from a slide have lesser chance to get caught than the large loop necker.  Most playgrounds prohibit hoodies with hood strings like the knotted necker.  I do think it looks sloppy and will spin around with any outdoor activity.  As a scouter lived in 5 countries, all wore slides, with a woggle as more universal.    Hope the loose knotted necker is just a short trend.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...