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JoeBob

Scout Killed at Camp Bert Adams - Falling Tree - GA

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That line of storms blew through here earlier. 

https://www.ajc.com/news/local/breaking-deadly-incident-newton-county-boy-scouts-camp/tVwr8m3HqQE8KN7moES4DK/

Bert Adams was aggressively thinning the trees when I was last there.  It's mostly towering pine trees 100's of feet tall.  I can vouch for the fact that cutting 90% of the trees makes the remaining 10% of trees more susceptible to wind damage.  Without the rest of the grove to dissipate some of the wind speed, the single trees get whipped around by the full force of the air.

What's the solution?  No trees?  No shade?  Dang, that's hot!

Heartfelt prayers for the family of the 14 yo Texas scout and all involved.

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So sad.

You can second-guess forever. Tall stands of old pine drop limbs on calm days. Thinning them is the only way to curb that. The balance between preventing one calamity while still avoiding the other remains in the hands of the Almighty.

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I was at Lawhorn Scout Base south of Atlanta this past week when we heard about this tragedy on the east side of Atlanta.  We also had serveral trees down throughout camp, along with several large limbs.  Fortunately, no injuries from them.  Some were in campsites, but no tents damaged and no one hurt.  Along with the camp maintenance staff, we did help cut down several dead trees that could be immediate threats throughout the campsites.

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My troop was there. There were 60-some-odd trees downed during this storm. Some trees were uprooted, but a number were sliced in two some 20-30 feet up. There were two oaks that were uprooted and fell on either side of this poor Scout's tent, but the oak standing between the other two that actually fell on the tent had been lopped off midair. For reference, it takes 94+ mph winds to shear a tree like this. It was a microburst that came almost out of nowhere, though the hard shelter alarm was sounded a few minutes before the accident. There were a lot of boys wanting to go home that day and the next couple of days, let me tell you, but aside from the affected troop most stayed and, I believe, ended up being glad they did.

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