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NYLT strip?

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Speaking of NYLT youth recognition, an Eagle candidate in my troop attended NYLT fairly recently here in Michigan's Southern Shores FSC and was given 3 pieces of cord. 2 are red, one is blue. I gather that one red and the blue indicate the NYLT colors, the third, I was told indicates the "patrol" he was in. Each patrol was given a different color. He was told they had to braid them into a shoulder loop, similar to the den chief cords (but braided) and were to be worn in the same fashion. Is this done elsewhere? If so, how does he go about braiding them (is there a specific way?) and is it truly required for "Class A" uniform? He was told he is to be in full uniform for his EBOR(and rightly so), and I think he and his mom are being made to believe this is part of the uniform. What say you?

 

I've seen the pogey cords on NYLT folks in my council too. Different colors though on one guy: orange and blue. It was suppose to designate NYLT course and their patrol.

 

I know when I did BA22, we had a pin with yarn attached to it in lieu of patrol medallions. When I staffed JLT, we ribbon and pins. Except for the youth staff. We wore a blueon white poka dotted ribbon around our Smokeys.  Old fogeys on staff didn't need no stinking ribbons ;)

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When I attended NYLT Top Gun when we graduated the course back in 2015 they gave us a tan and red strip that says TOP GUN and we wear them right above the right pocket. 

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3 minutes ago, Deerehaas18 said:

When I attended NYLT Top Gun when we graduated the course back in 2015 they gave us a tan and red strip that says TOP GUN and we wear them right above the right pocket. 

Never heard of that. Must be a local thing? How is it different from regular NYLT?

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10 minutes ago, Col. Flagg said:

Never heard of that. Must be a local thing? How is it different from regular NYLT?

So we just call it top gun or at least when I attended.  It is being changed to NYLT TOP GUN and I belive this year its just NYLT.

If you look at the picture I added you can see the two strips. These are similar to what I believe he was talking about. 

blurred.jpg

Edited by Deerehaas18
add text

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My son did NYLT and they had a Harry Potter theme so they were 'houses' instead of patrols. Cute. Had a custom NYLT Council patch with a Hogwarts on it. He liked enough to swap out our old Council patch. 

I dislike the cords and what-not they seem a little too Wood Badgey for my taste. YMMV

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Gotta be a regional or local thing. Never heard of any change to NYLT in my area.

I have seen the NYLT patches that look like the "Trained" patches. I have seen off-issue ones too done by local councils or units. I have head a few districts call their leader training "SEAL Training" and other such names to make it sound more elite than plain-old NYLT.

I'd be interested to see how/if these programs differ from NYLT. To carry on the metaphor I'd liken NYLT to advanced flight training. I'd call NAYLE more akin to "Top Gun" or "Red Flag".

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The NYLT strip is an official uniform item; it goes in the same location as the Trained strip would go, as detailed on official materials. I even posted a link to Scoutstuff.org so you all can see.

http://www.scoutstuff.org/bsa/uniforms-insignia/insignia-cloth/earned/emb-nylt-trained-strip.html

Any other cords, patches, or whatever are unofficial, and are not to be worn on the official uniform (along with anything else not officially sanctioned by the Guide to Awards and Insignia). You could put an extra patch centered on the right pocket as a temporary insignia, but that is the only exception. Adding cords, strips, or whatnot seems excessive to me, but beyond that, it's specifically not approved. From page 8 of the Guide to Awards and Insignia:

"Clause 10. No alteration of, or additions to,
the official badges and insignia or in the rules and
regulations governing their use or their location
upon the uniform may be authorized by any
Scouting official, local council, local executive
board, or committee except the National
Executive Board of the Boy Scouts of America
and committees specifically authorized thereof.
Proprietary backing is to be used on all official
BSA patches and emblems. Products without
appropriate backing are considered illegal."

And from page 14 of the Guide:

"Custom loops or other colors are not authorized for wear with the BSA uniform."

Sorry to all those wanting to embellish your uniforms. Finally, my favorite clause from the Guide:

"Excess Insignia: With the exception of the Cub Scout badges of rank, members wear only the insignia that show their present status in the movement. Members should make every effort to keep their uniforms neat and uncluttered. Previously earned badges and insignia—not representing present status—make a fine display on a BSA red patch vest, on a trophy hide or blanket, exhibited in the home of the recipient, or at functions where such a display is invited. Boy Scouts may wear only temporary patches (no badges of rank) on the back of the merit badge sash."

 

Edited by The Latin Scot

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I have seen the "NYLT" strips similar to the "Trained" strips.  They were in our National Scout Shop so I assume they are official from National.  (That may of course be an incorrect assumption.)

I thought one of the points of NYLT was to eliminate the council-by-council differences in courses and names.

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2 minutes ago, The Latin Scot said:

The NYLT strip is an official uniform item; it goes in the same location as the Trained strip would go, as detailed on official materials. I even posted a link to Scoutstuff.org so you all can see.

http://www.scoutstuff.org/bsa/uniforms-insignia/insignia-cloth/earned/emb-nylt-trained-strip.html

Any other cords, patches, or whatever are unofficial, and are not to be worn on the official uniform (along with anything else not officially sanctioned by the Guide to Awards and Insignia). You could put an extra patch centered on the right pocket as a temporary insignia, but that is the only exception. Adding cords, strips, or whatnot seems excessive to me, but beyond that, it's specifically not approved. From page 8 of the Guide to Awards and Insignia:

"Clause 10. No alteration of, or additions to,
the official badges and insignia or in the rules and
regulations governing their use or their location
upon the uniform may be authorized by any
Scouting official, local council, local executive
board, or committee except the National
Executive Board of the Boy Scouts of America
and committees specifically authorized thereof.
Proprietary backing is to be used on all official
BSA patches and emblems. Products without
appropriate backing are considered illegal."

And from page 14 of the Guide:

"Custom loops or other colors are not authorized for wear with the BSA uniform."

Sorry to all those wanting to embellish your uniforms. Finally, my favorite clause from the Guide:

"Excess Insignia: With the exception of the Cub Scout badges of rank, members wear only the insignia that show their present status in the movement. Members should make every effort to keep their uniforms neat and uncluttered. Previously earned badges and insignia—not representing present status—make a fine display on a BSA red patch vest, on a trophy hide or blanket, exhibited in the home of the recipient, or at functions where such a display is invited. Boy Scouts may wear only temporary patches (no badges of rank) on the back of the merit badge sash. Jamboree"

 

Interesting. Our district wears the strips and we've never been told not to or that it was in regulation.

I'm not trying to say your wrong. I'll have to ask around and see what the deal with my district. 

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Just now, NJCubScouter said:

I have seen the "NYLT" strips similar to the "Trained" strips.  They were in our National Scout Shop so I assume they are official from National.  (That may of course be an incorrect assumption.)

I thought one of the points of NYLT was to eliminate the council-by-council differences in courses and names.

Well they are changing the name from TOP GUN back to NYLT this year. 

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7 minutes ago, The Latin Scot said:

The NYLT strip is an official uniform item; it goes in the same location as the Trained strip would go, as detailed on official materials. I even posted a link to Scoutstuff.org so you all can see.

http://www.scoutstuff.org/bsa/uniforms-insignia/insignia-cloth/earned/emb-nylt-trained-strip.html

Any other cords, patches, or whatever are unofficial, and are not to be worn on the official uniform (along with anything else not officially sanctioned by the Guide to Awards and Insignia). You could put an extra patch centered on the right pocket as a temporary insignia, but that is the only exception. Adding cords, strips, or whatnot seems excessive to me, but beyond that, it's specifically not approved. From page 8 of the Guide to Awards and Insignia:

"Clause 10. No alteration of, or additions to,
the official badges and insignia or in the rules and
regulations governing their use or their location
upon the uniform may be authorized by any
Scouting official, local council, local executive
board, or committee except the National
Executive Board of the Boy Scouts of America
and committees specifically authorized thereof.
Proprietary backing is to be used on all official
BSA patches and emblems. Products without
appropriate backing are considered illegal."

And from page 14 of the Guide:

"Custom loops or other colors are not authorized for wear with the BSA uniform."

Sorry to all those wanting to embellish your uniforms. Finally, my favorite clause from the Guide:

"Excess Insignia: With the exception of the Cub Scout badges of rank, members wear only the insignia that show their present status in the movement. Members should make every effort to keep their uniforms neat and uncluttered. Previously earned badges and insignia—not representing present status—make a fine display on a BSA red patch vest, on a trophy hide or blanket, exhibited in the home of the recipient, or at functions where such a display is invited. Boy Scouts may wear only temporary patches (no badges of rank) on the back of the merit badge sash."

 

See if you talk about this stuff long enough the Fun Police come out. Next you are gonna tell me that there is no Klingon Interpreter Strip. 

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On 5/19/2015 at 9:38 PM, Stosh said:

First time I saw it I thought it stood for Not Yet Litter Trained.

Maybe thats why we still go with Grey Wolf :)

On 5/19/2015 at 11:29 PM, Gone said:

If the NYLT strip is not official why put it on at all? Coolness does not make it legit.

Meh. I like local traditions. Our troop has been giving lanyards as a summer camp thing since the 30s. If you earn rank at camp you get a cool lanyard. Other lanyards are given for other reasons serious or not. The scouts all wear them at CoHs etc... The Eagle Scout lanyards take quite a while to make and the most impressive bit of decorative knotwork I've ever seen . Every summer when lanyards are being given out at the closing campfire, any troop Eagles with lanyards(usually alums who are counselors or camp director and any active scouts) get to show off thee works of art as part of our "official" uniform.  

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14 minutes ago, Tampa Turtle said:

See if you talk about this stuff long enough the Fun Police come out. Next you are gonna tell me that there is no Klingon Interpreter Strip. 

Hey now, pointing out the official policies in the interest of educating the public has nothing to do with having fun; I simply wanted to express the official stance so that those who legitimately want to know can get an answer. Would I walk up to a kid with excess patches and shout AWAY SINNER! while tearing off his patches? Of course not. But will I try to encourage correct uniforming while teaching the principles behind it? Obviously. And it can be just as fun as if I were to allow clown shoes and sequins on the uniforms; it's all in how you teach it to the kids. 

As far as leaders go, however, I just expect better. I am in no position to tell others what to do, but if people have questions, then they deserve answers. Sorry if I stepped on anybody's toes in doing so!

Edited by The Latin Scot

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29 minutes ago, Tampa Turtle said:

See if you talk about this stuff long enough the Fun Police come out. Next you are gonna tell me that there is no Klingon Interpreter Strip. 

Of he pa' is an official tlhingan Interpreter qosta'. Hoch idiot knows 'e'! 'oh is not parha' BSA is staffed by Romulans, is 'oh?  ;):cool::ph34r:

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25 minutes ago, oldbuzzard said:

Meh. I like local traditions

Some I like, others not so much.

But to point @The Latin Scot is making, if we allow everyone their own little "change" to things then you really don't have a "uniform" uniform, do we? I could get behind allowing units 1-2 places they can ad lib with their own dongles. BSA already allows hats, neckers and patches to be customized. How many more special things do we need?

I love the sentiment behind such things, but I do agree we need guidelines and limits.

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