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3D printed Pinewood Derby cars?

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18 hours ago, Tampa Turtle said:

...

I have a big issue with 3-D printing; make it a STEM thing.

Actually, it's STEAM now. (The NOVA award includes an Agriculture component.) So, in theory, one could 3D print a cellular matrix, infuse balsa wood cells, drain the media, allow the cells to grow and mature along the matrix-including growing them around the axles (tires already inserted), and cure the assembly. With a little genetic engineering you could have the bark mature in different colors -- a pre-painted car. No band saw required. :ph34r:

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2 minutes ago, qwazse said:

Actually, it's STEAM now. (The NOVA award includes an Agriculture component.) So, in theory, one could 3D print a cellular matrix, infuse balsa wood cells, drain the media, allow the cells to grow and mature along the matrix-including growing them around the axles (tires already inserted), and cure the assembly. With a little genetic engineering you could have the bark mature in different colors -- a pre-painted car. No band saw required. :ph34r:

DIdn't know they did Agriculture

 

Our local council did Steam, but A is for Art, as in computer assisted Art

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9 minutes ago, qwazse said:

Actually, it's STEAM now. (The NOVA award includes an Agriculture component.) So, in theory, one could 3D print a cellular matrix, infuse balsa wood cells, drain the media, allow the cells to grow and mature along the matrix-including growing them around the axles (tires already inserted), and cure the assembly. With a little genetic engineering you could have the bark mature in different colors -- a pre-painted car. No band saw required. :ph34r:

Wayyyyy too difficult.  Mix pine sawdust with Elmer's glue, mold to make it look like a car.  Let dry, sand a bit and paint.

And as an extra thought, one does not need a band saw to make a PWD car.  That's a dad's way of doing it, not the boys.

Edited by Stosh
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Or just go on eBay and buy a car.  Have your au pair attend the Pack meeting with your son and fire her if he loses.  I’m not sure why everyone is making this so complicated. 

I’m not a fan of 3D printed car idea at this point... perhaps in the future when they are cheaper and more widely available.  For now, keep it simple and have the kids build as much of the car as they can based on their ability.  

Ever since we found out (after the race ceremony) that our winning scouts car was purchased for nearly $100 on eBay I’ve soured on the event.  Overall it is fun for parents and kids but there are still Too many parents overly involved with their kids race results.  Our biggest trophy is for Sportsmanship ship as well, but that hasn’t stopped some of the arguments (my favorite was one with a parent regarding why they ... i mean their kid.. placed 8th instead of 7th).  My stance.... it doesn’t matter.... they didn’t like that response.

 

 

 

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There's a good YouTube video on making PWC cars, weight placement, axle bending, riding on three wheels, etc.

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On 1/2/2018 at 4:25 PM, Tampa Turtle said:

I'd say it wasn't Kosher. Yeah, I used to be a 'car screener' and we bounced 1 or 2 that were not made from the kit. I know we had Outlaw races and Dad's races. I can see 3-D printed car races but not as an "Official Pinewood Derby" race. Seems like someone could win at a local unit and be bounced as they competed at District. But who knows these days?

I wanted to bounce a few like that

They were very obviously a pre-carved body store bought, and not from a block of wood in the kit.... I recognized some distinctive shapes from my web searches

but no real way to prove it....and we have to take them at their word..... standing there parent and son next to each other at the sign in table...."did you make this car?"  "Yes we did."  You know they are crossing their fingers behind their back....

If it were up to me  I think I would either do the build the day of the race, or at the meeting prior with all cars "sequestered" between meetings.  

As an engineer, I enjoyed trying to teach physics to my son.... CG, inertia, friction, etc.... and a lot of that couldn't be done quite to the same level if doing it all race day....

but all in all I think it would be better and more fun for the scouts

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On 1/11/2018 at 9:13 AM, scotteg83 said:

DIdn't know they did Agriculture

 

Our local council did Steam, but A is for Art, as in computer assisted Art

Oh sure, let's make those artists feel good about themselves ... stimulates young minds ... makes for better society ... blah blah blah. :p

On 1/11/2018 at 9:44 AM, Tampa Turtle said:

Yeah ART here too...but we are City Slickers. 

City slickers. There may be more of us, but that doesn't mean more electoral votes! (Oh, Mr. Moderator? Sorry for the tangent.)

Find details about Agriculture requirements, introduced last year, as "Let it Grow" in the Boy Scout NOVA award's fifth wheel here: http://www.usscouts.org/advance/nova/scout-nova-5.asp.

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We still have a small issue with parents building the cars, but I have almost completely put an end to it.

We allow the use of the "kit cars" sold at hobby lobby, etc.  I would rather see a Tiger open one of the kit cars, assemble it, paint it, put the weight and stickers on themselves then to see a parent build the car for them.  Lions and Tigers using kit cars are fine, by wolf they should be building their own.

How I get parents to stop building the Scout's car?  We host derby workshops, if the Scouts get to see other scouts building their own cars they encourage their parents to let them build their own.  We encourage younger lion through wolf moms and dads to build their own cars and we will even supply them.  I teach parents to build the same car as their Scout.  This way the parent can make the large cuts on the body of the car, then demonstrate to the Scout how to do the finer things like sanding, polishing axles, etc on the parent's own car.  Let the Scout do the same on their car.  The Scout may not want to do everything like getting weight placement 100% correct.  When mom's car is faster then next year the Scout will pay more attention.  This works wonders.  Some of our workshops are on weekends, some are during the normal Den Meetings, this way the Scouts get to see others building their own cars. 

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My pack had the problem where people bought premade cars... Nobody cared since it was mostly the leader’s children.

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What I think I'm going to start trying to stress more is age-appropriate, progressively hands-off car building & instruction. I don't expect a Tiger to build a car completely on his own. But by Bear I think it's reasonable to expect that. Webelos at the latest. But incrementally, dad should be progressively more hands off. If done right, those early years of helping and teaching (something often lacking in the process, doing vs. instructing and demonstrating with purpose) should give way to the knowledge, ability, and skills to 100% build a car on their own by their 3rd or 4th car. 

I also include speed improvements as part of that learning. It seems like the emphasis is placed on "this should be a fun activity" and removal of the competitive aspect of it. But it's still a competition. If we want to say it's just all for fun, we should stop handing out medals and trophies. So learning things like weight, aerodynamics, friction, etc., I think has a place in the boys learning how to build a car. Focusing on the fun doesn't mean we have to take the science out of it. Especially if we're supposed to be this STEM-friendly organization.

In an ideal situation, a boy learns how to build a car with help from dad over the years, and gets to a point where he can build a car on his own, be proud of what he built, and also show up on race day with a competitive car, too. 

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