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eagle90

LED Lanterns

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I'm looking for a recommendation on rechargeable LED lanterns.  Brand. how many lumens, price, how long will they last one a charge.  We are looking to move away from propane (expensive, noisy, etc.)  Thanks in advance for the help!

 

Dale

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I can recommend a lantern that hits on all of your points but one, it isn't rechargable - the Rayovac SE3DLNACOM.  You can pick it up for less than $20 on Amazon.  240 Lumens, small and compact.  It runs off of 3 D Cell Batteries.  As I stated, it isn't rechargable, but you could use rechargable batteries in it.  My family has used three of these for camping for close to three or four years now.  We carry extra batteries, but rarely have to change the batteries even using at least one of the lanterns for several hours each night.  Since you can get so many hours out of a set of batteries, the lack of rechargability shouldn't be a major deal because you shouldn't need to swap out the batteries all that often.

 

We generally hang one or two upside down under our dining fly, there is a clip on the underside for doing this and the diffuser on top can be removed easily.  This lights up the area pretty well.  It isn't as bright as our Coleman white gas lantern, but it's usually bright enough for playing cards or whatever we want to do outside.

 

If you don't have one of these, you can't beat the price and it's worth having one at home just in case of an emergency.  You might want to pick one up to give it a try, I think you'll fall in love with it like I have.  I bought my first one years ago during a multi-day power outage, and it is still going strong.  We liked it so much we picked up two more over the years.  During that same storm, I also picked up a Coleman Quad LED Lantern which uses rechargable panels.  Several of the panels no longer hold a charge and the batteries need to be replaced.  It wasn't a bad lantern, but it has fallen out of favor because we like the Rayovac so much more.

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I'm not a fan of lanterns

rank them right up there with loud boom-boxes

 

but

a lot of guys in our troop are using those inflatable solar lanterns.

like this one

https://www.rei.com/product/100705/mpowerd-luci-original-inflatable-solar-lantern

except the ones with frosted balloons are better for light dispersion

 

As lanterns go, I like 'em.... not so blinding to those of us nearby that aren't in need of the general task lighting...

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I'm going to jump in here since this is a newer post on roughly the same subject. My son will be bridging in March and for Christmas, I'd like to get him a durable, good light for camping trips. Right now all he has is a BSA headlamp and a bunch of small, not-very-bright flashlights. I wasn't sure whether to go the flashlight or lantern route. I looked around but kept finding items way out of my price range (I'd like to keep it under $50 if possible.) Will be looking up the Rayovac SE3DLNACOM but any other suggestions are greatly appreciated!

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@@Faith, congratulations to your son! If the troop goes on lots of treks (the carry-your-own-gear kind) you will want to stick with the hand held LEDs or headlamps. Best if they all use the same batteries. I routinely pack a headlamp, a AA battery hand light, and spare batteries for them and/or my gps. (Plus I have some old foil wrappers in another pocket of my pack and steel wool in another pocket ... in case my matches fail me.)

 

I do have one of those rechargeable headlamp/hand lights, (Nitecore), but it gets really hot. A young scout might not be comfortable working with it. Certain types of batteries for it are on the no-fly list. So, you have to be careful about what you purchase for replacements if you take an airline to the trail head. On the other hand, it is nice not to need spare batteries.

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 I hit the local Walmart and pick up the $1 led flashlights that fit into the pocket. 

 

Never was a fan of head lights, every time one talks to some one who has one, looks up and blinds you for the next 10 minutes.  Super annoying.  The cheap little $1 shots are bright enough that I put my fingers over the end to cut down the light to something bearable.

 

If one loses one, they are out a buck.  No big deal.

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I no longer use gas or battery-powered lanterns. I felt like it was not only a big drain on my budget, but also on the environment. I now use the Luci solar-powered blow-up lanterns that blw2 linked in his post. For their size, they put off a lot of light. One is fine for general lighting, but two are better if you need task lighting. I'll strap one on my backpack while we're hiking and it's ready to go once it gets dark. I'm not sure how long a fully-charged lantern will last, but I've had them run for hours in the evening and have never once run out of light. When they first came out, they were only $9 each, so I bought a bunch. I keep two in my tent trailer, one in my backpack, several in my house in case of power outage, and I even have one in my glove compartment in my car for emergencies.

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Eagle90:

 

I haven't found battery operated lanterns that use rechargable batteries that are suitable for base camping (I like that better than "car camping" or "stop and plop camping").  Our troop has gone to using the refillable propane tanks with stands.  We are planning on purchasing smaller propane tanks here: https://www.lowes.com/pd/Worthington-Pro-Grade-4-25-lb-Propane-Tank/3089591to replace the larger 20 pound tanks.  We also use the tanks and stand pipes for cooking.  That way, we aren't throwing away 4 to 6 of the Coleman fuel tanks for each campout.

 

 

Faith:

 

I have a good headlamp that has a regular and red light setting.  The red light is great for night hiking because it doesn't cause your pupils to contract allowing your eyes to see outside of where the beam shines.  A scout can hang this in their tent to shine light.  It doesn't have to be super expensive (around 25 is a good price).   I also carry a cheap small LED flashlight like this: https://www.lowes.com/pd/Lux-Pro-90-Lumens-LED-Handheld-Battery-Flashlight/50333207.  As others have said, think dual use -- get something they can use for base camping and for backcountry adventures where they have to carry their own gear.  I've had other lanterns -- a candle lantern and a Black Diamond Apollo and they aren't that good.  I have to admit, the Luci lanterns look neat -- I may have to get one and try it out.  I can't help myself... I'm a major gear-head.

 

Just a thought -- if your son doesn't have a flint and steel, get him one.  The new guys in our Troop love to use them with a cotton ball and petroleum jelly to start a fire. Also, if he doesn't have a good pocket knife get him just a knife (no multitools) with a locking blade.  I love the Ontario RAT 2 folding knives - they are a little bit smaller but a really cool knife for scouts crossing over. http://www.ridgeknifeshop.com/search.php?pg=1&stext=rat+folder&sprice=&stype=&scat=&sman=13

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 I hit the local Walmart and pick up the $1 led flashlights that fit into the pocket. 

 

Never was a fan of head lights, every time one talks to some one who has one, looks up and blinds you for the next 10 minutes.  Super annoying.  The cheap little $1 shots are bright enough that I put my fingers over the end to cut down the light to something bearable.

 

If one loses one, they are out a buck.  No big deal.

I recently bought a gross of these little things... in a drawer at home.

I love them and hate them at the same time......

I have found that I don't even bother changing batteries in them if they last that long.....

because IF they last that long, they are soon to fail anyway.  They are great, till one day without warning they'll get glitchy and will work fine, then when you want it again in five minuets and pull it back out of your pocket it just wont come on.... slap it around, it'll work..... time to toss it.

Not very eco friendly in that regard.

and the beam doesn't have much throw either, ok for close work though...

I no longer use gas or battery-powered lanterns. I felt like it was not only a big drain on my budget, but also on the environment. I now use the Luci solar-powered blow-up lanterns that blw2 linked in his post. For their size, they put off a lot of light. One is fine for general lighting, but two are better if you need task lighting. I'll strap one on my backpack while we're hiking and it's ready to go once it gets dark. I'm not sure how long a fully-charged lantern will last, but I've had them run for hours in the evening and have never once run out of light. When they first came out, they were only $9 each, so I bought a bunch. I keep two in my tent trailer, one in my backpack, several in my house in case of power outage, and I even have one in my glove compartment in my car for emergencies.

I saw some inflatable solars still glowing the next morning at summer camp....

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I am not a fan of lanterns, especially large ones. When out of doors, the purpose is not to recreate the indoors. When one allows their eyes to adjust to the dark, the forest can be seen in a "new light". The shadows dancing by the campfire light are fun to watch, as are the stars overhead. I do use headlamps, like most flashlights users need to learn not to direct them at someone elses face. Turn them on only when when needed for the short period of use, and then back off. If on in a group, angle the beam down. Almost all have a hinge to angle the beam down. I also recommend the less luminous lights. Again, the purpose is not to light up the entire forest. Makes going to bed easier too, people tend to stay up later when there is more light.

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Thank you all for your input! We invested in a few different lights like the ones mentioned here & a fire starter. He will have his head lamp as well as a backup and we will be working soon on the proper way to use it without blinding everyone. We stayed away from anything that took anything outside of the A/C/D batteries.

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