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Found 17 results

  1. Interesting bit: It refers to his service in the Navy during WW2. I wonder how common such late Eagle Scouts were after the war? This is the first I heard of the practice.
  2. The title to this thread is not very good, and for that I apologize. However, I am trying to find out some very specific and difficult information. I have already contacted the National BSA Office, the local council office, and NESA as well. All of them tell me that they do not have the information I am looking for. Having said that, I am turning to you guys for some help. I was curious as to who had the longest string of consecutive Eagle Scouts in their family? For example, you hear about father-sons who both earned their Eagle. Sometimes you hear about Grandfathers, Fathers, and Sons...which would be three consecutive Eagles. However, not only am I curious as to what the longest string of consecutive Eagles would be, but if it is four or five, who are they? How can we find them? I know...kind of random...but thanks.
  3. I'm spinning this off the other thread about sharing costs of ECoHs. Most of us agree that ceremonies can be bogged down when folks (usually excited parents) try to pack in too many elements. That lead to some interesting questions about the seemingly wordy Eagle Pledge and Eagle Charge which, on paper don't seem like much, but can be the last straw when preceded by guest speakers, special recognitions, etc ... . So when did did the pledge and charge become part of the ceremony? Some of us youngns remember it back in the 70s. Anybody got a memory or publication with things of the sort from an earlier court of honor?
  4. Well we knew this was coming... A Bridgehampton teen who has advocated tirelessly for years for the right for young women to join Boy Scouts saw victory recently — but, sadly, by the time girls are allowed to join Boy Scout troops in 2019, she will have aged out of the program. To that end, her father Gary Ireland and the rest of Sydney Ireland's family are urging people to write to Boy Scout President Randall Stephenson and Chief Scout Executive Michael Surbaugh and ask them to allow Sydney "to join the organization immediately so that she can have the opportunity to work towards the Eagle Rank. . . Please give her the opportunity to be part of the change and finish what she started," Ireland wrote. Source link with email addresses: https://patch.com/new-york/southampton/teen-who-fought-girls-join-boy-scouts-seeks-earn-eagle So if she and her family are successful, maybe there will be "soft launches" in some Scout troops soon or maybe a full path to Eagle will be implemented in Venturing. Could be a win-win.
  5. So this whole issue begs the question: If a GS/USA Gold Awardee were to join BSA4G, would see qualify for the eagle?
  6. I love the tag line that emphasizes that the girls can earn Eagle so as to emphasize that's the most important thing when it comes to the "older girls program".
  7. Bridgeville town council in November voted to rename Locust Alley to Eagle Way in honor of BSA Troop No. 2. Nearly 70 scouts from have earned Eagle Scout since the troop started in 1982 http://www.post-gazette.com/local/west/2017/12/08/Street-in-Bridgeville-to-be-renamed-in-honor-of-Boy-Scout-Troop-2-Eagle-Scouts/stories/201712070001 Nice way to get Eagles and the BSA on the map.
  8. Not a question but a rant. Have been mentoring a scout through the Eagle Rank process. When it came time to complete his application I gave him some guidance on filling it out. I made sure he had the latest version (April 2017)... https://www.scouting.org/filestore/pdf/512-728_wb_fillable.pdf I went to point out the statement of "ambitions and life purpose" to make sure he included that. Well it is no longer part of requirement #7. I re-read every requirement on the application and could not find it. Knowing that there were some changes to all the rank requirements at the beginning of the year I concluded that the statement was no longer required. The scout completed his application and project notebook and submitted it to the Council office. After a couple weeks to my surprise the council office e-mailed me that the statement was missing. I nearly fired back an e-mail telling them they had it wrong but fortunately I did some more checking before I did that. Found that the statement is mentioned tucked in the Scout's signature between requirements #6 & #7. Seems to me that if it is to be a requirement it should be listed as a numbered requirement. Even looking online at the requirements it sits in a box between requirements #6 & %7... https://www.scouting.org/filestore/boyscouts/pdf/Eagle_rank_2017.pdf Just a little frustrated with the delay this has caused.
  9. http://www.theadvertiser.com/story/life/empowerment/2017/09/20/blind-man-gives-blind-triplets-new-shot-life/682584001/ “They were in Boy Scouts since they were 12, I wanted them to learn how to build their own support system. My goal has been to empower them to grow. I didn’t want their success to be based on what I did for them.†“They never seek exceptions to the rule. These boys have shot rifles by themselves, they drove three-wheelers at the Jersey Shore on the dunes … I just want them to be the best people they can be.†True character building.
  10. Someone gets sick of some adults across the country earning ranks. Result: bookwork badges suitable for school kids become required, field study badges become elective. Someone pitches a fit over some scouter who lets a patrol hike with their girlfriends or over a girl making rank. Result: we don't really know who all of the Eagle Scouts in this country are. Then someone hears about some godless kid in the ranks, and someone else makes a federal case about it. Result: public institutions are not to accommodate, making the organization increasingly beholden to some moral majority. Purges ensue. The boys need more adult leaders, so women step forward, but women never had an opportunity to prove skills by making rank, so we create weekend training because, well, surely adults can learn in a day what it takes boys years. Then someone in one part of the country gets all up in arms about activists in another part of the country riding on the organization's coat tails by touting an out and proud SM. Zealous men an women ask the now polarized organization to protect our boys. Then someone wants us to sift boys for sexual persuasion like we sift adults. Diminishing by a thousand cuts. So, like some lackluster cheerleading squad, scouters get deluded into thinking some of those cuts are what makes us special: Pardon me, but I never really knew that I earned anything besides Eagle Scout. Nobody told me it was at all special because girls couldn't earn it. Once I learned that men used to be able to earn it, it felt a little less special to me. All those SM/ASM who felt they were a little "less qualified" because they missed some opportunity in their youth. Why can't we say, "well, what's holding you back now?" All those venturers to whom boys said, "Your Silver will never be as good as my Eagle." I know some SMs who would have liked to give those young women a handbook and say "Show them how it's done." In fact, one SM quite proudly told me about having sisters work through the requirements even if national won't give them the rank. Compare to your vision Eagle milled boys, I think those girls add value to the badge because they want it's substance, not some line on a resume. We can spout off about youth development, membership numbers, etc ... But don't think for a moment that any pride in my bling stems from it being a boys only (no men, no girls, no women, no godless) award.
  11. Yah, in another thread @@MattR says: The BSA created this monster. The term Eagle sells this program like none other and yet the meaning of that term is the source of all the grief. It's not the adults that are the problem so much as the definition of Eagle. Seems like that's a worthy thing to discuss without all da sturm und drang associated with a particular case. I can't figure out how to spin off a new thread in this newfangled forum software, so I'm just startin' from scratch. I reckon @@MattR has a good point in that we aren't very consistent about what we view as an Eagle Scout. On the one hand, we say it means a lad who exhibits da best of character, fitness, and citizenship. Somethin' that only 5% manage to achieve, somethin' so important that it merits a full private banquet award ceremony, congratulatory letters from POTUS and other local, state, and national leaders, somethin' that is so outstandin' that it merits special consideration for college admissions and military promotions and job applications. On the other hand, we say it means someone who has done just da requirements, no adding. Which means a lad who has gone car campin' 20 nights in 7 years, sat through some Saturday mornin' MB classes, drowned in a forward direction for 100 yards once upon a time, and held a title of Troop Librarian for a bit over a year in a troop that really didn't have much of a library (aren't all these things online now? ). So let's talk about what Eagle Scout should be, eh? Or maybe what yeh make it mean in your program and how yeh do that. To add fuel to da fire, I've always had a warm spot in my heart for Eagle Scouts when hirin' or lookin' for interns and such. I've had pretty good luck that way. I also have a colleague who won't hire Eagle Scouts any more. His experience has been that Eagle Scouts expect to have everything laid out for 'em and spoon fed to 'em. He finds 'em to be da bottom of da barrel in terms of work performance. Beavah
  12. When Australian actor Chris Hemsworth left his wallet in a Los Angeles restaurant, 17-year-old Tristin Budzyn-Baker came to his rescue. "I looked up at my mom and was like, 'ma, do you know who this is?'" he recounted Monday on The Ellen DeGeneres Show (H/T Mashable). "We found Thor's wallet." Instead of pocketing it, Budzyn-Baker tracked down Hemsworth and returned the wallet full of cash. "I expected it was going to be empty, and all the cash was in there" Hemsworth said on Ellen, sitting beside Budzyn-Baker. In return, the teen scored his family some tickets, a stack of wash (typo? for cash) from Hemsworth and a $10,000 reward from the publishing service, Shutterfly. Budzyn-Baker, a boy scout, also got a letter of recommendation from Hemsworth for the Eagle Scout award. "Thank you for being such an honest guy," DeGeneres said. Thor's brother, Loki, could not be reached for comment. http://www.usatoday.com/story/life/entertainthis/2016/04/20/teen-returns-chris-hemsworth-wallet-gets-10k-reward/83267728/ http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/tv/ellen-teen-10-000-finding-chris-hemworth-wallet-article-1.2607514
  13. KenD500

    Troop Eagle gift?

    Our Troop will soon have it's first Eagle since I took over as SM. I know some Troops in the area give an Eagle gift to the Scout during his COH. Some of them that I know of: his name on the Eagle plaque, an engraved Eagle statue, a lifetime membership to NESA. Does your Troop give an Eagle gift? If so, what is it?
  14. Last night, I introduced an Eagle candidate from our Troop to his Eagle BOR. This was the first time doing so. I had asked other SMs in the district what they say for an introduction. Now I'm asking you. Do you has Scoutmaster introduce your Eagle candidate at his Eagle board? If so, what do you say?
  15. WasE61

    Public Kudos To My Boy

    Public kudos to my son. For nearly 5 year he stopped Scouting. His father passed suddenly when he was 12. Scouting was their summer pastime. He took up Marching Band ... it was his gig...played along side my other son in jazz band. This year, he decided to try for his Eagle. Banged out the rest of this requirements for Life. Picked out his Eagle project...planning in progress. Then at one of the Troop Eagle Board reviews ... the adult in charge said, "Sorry, your Life Rank was one week too late." I think most boys would have folded it up and gone home...not my son. "Well, I'm going to do the project anyway." Good boy...
  16. For he first fifty years of the BSA, adults could earn Eagle along with their sons. Bryan's Blog posted Some clippings of how that played out: http://blog.scoutingmagazine.org/2015/07/02/10-times-history-adults-earned-eagle-scout-award/ I've heard a few reasons why this practice ended. The position of responsibility requirements were added; however, adults hold official and unofficial positions in a troop. Likewise, leading a service project (also a novel requirement at the time) would be as challenging for many adults. One respondent to the blog cited a 1972 handbook: "it would be unfair to permit those over 18 to earn badges since they would be easier for them.†I noticed that this synchronized with a series of changes to the required list of merit badges from which Bird Study, Pioneering, Signaling, and Pathfinding were dropped. All of those were concepts that I've seen challenge adult and boy alike. The addition of bookwork badges to the required list could favor the adult unfairly. But, I'm wondering if the '72 statement is a reversal of causality. That is, without adults in the picture, did BSA have more freedom to add more material that paralleled school life? Was the removal of adult Eagles the first step toward a more indoor program?
  17. John-in-KC

    Late In Life Eagle

    This is trending. You can also find a version at scoutingnewsroom, but my isp is not friendly to that ip/domain. http://www.ledger-enquirer.com/2015/06/14/3768685_boy-scout-finds-eagle-application.html?rh=1 Gist of the story: Scout completes requirements before age 18. Unit screws up the paperwork. Eventually, a copy of the app is found. Submitted through Council to National. National, under current Advancement policy, decides the breakdown is on the adult side of matters, not the youth. National authorizes an EBOR. Old Scouter earns Eagle.
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