Jump to content

Longhaired_Mac

Members
  • Content Count

    55
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    1

Longhaired_Mac last won the day on July 24 2014

Longhaired_Mac had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

31 Excellent

About Longhaired_Mac

  • Rank
    ⚜️Advancement Chair, Asst Cubmaster, & Asst Tiger Den Leader⚜️
  • Birthday 09/27/1975

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    East Wenatchee, WA
  • Occupation
    Small Business Owner
  • Interests
    Fatherhood, Archery, Hiking, Camping, Wood working, Fishing, BSA Scouts, Order of the Arrow, Pow Wows, Hammocks. Blessed Hammocks.
  • Biography
    Bobcat to Arrow of Light,
    Pack 32
    Scout to Eagle, Eagle palms
    Troop 8
    and Order of the Arrow as well.
    Ump Quah 335
    Now it's my son's turn.
    He's been on Pack hikes and outings this summer and will be in Tiger Cubs this September.
    Pack 32 (Same I was in),
    Apple Valley District of the Grand Columbia Council,
    in North-Central Washington.

Recent Profile Visitors

1127 profile views
  1. In the late nineteen eighties my Scoutmaster was a rather jolly fat man with a curly beard and a chew-can ring in all his back pockets. He found laughter in most everything as I recall, appropriate or not. When I hear things at Scouting U like, "if you can't act like a 10 year-old, then you shouldn't be in scouting," well he comes right to mind.

    He had a brown with tan stripe truck that hauled scouts and equipment every direction for a few years. Inside that 80's Chevy Scottsdale of his at all times was a cassette tape of Chuck Berry's greatest hits. The last song on the B side was My ding-a-ling (2 bells on a string). There wasn't a hike, camp-out, camparee, or outing where he didn't manage to squeeze in at least one play. And if one of the boys riding with him was quick enough to hit the repeat button on the tapedeck before his hand got smacked, we might hear it an extra time or two. It always started us off with a laugh or lolled us to sleep smiling on the drive home. I still sing it now and again when camping or flirting. Or showing off for my son.

    Now the Scoutmaster was far from Santa and the song is equally distant from anything that could be called a carol, yet as the end of the year draws near and the holiday cheer comes around...some of the coincidental similarities have my brain humming that old Chuck Berry tune. Any time I hear a Salvation Army station outside store fronts ringing thier bells, or clanky bells on doors. Happy Holidays to all my friends in scouting, new and old.

    https://youtu.be/UaEC-lWSlmI

  2. "Let me win. But if I cannot win, let me be brave in the attempt."  

  3. Longhaired_Mac

    Why all the slap-stick in Cub Scouting?

    Baden-Powell understood some Scouts did not learn well from simple verbal instruction or even from demonstration. And hands on repetition practices do not always teach skills enough for it to "stick." Early on B-P had Scouts doing skits as another way of learning skills and communications. Skits might be "campy" or "corny" but when everyone is laughing at everyone it takes a lot of anxiety out of the situation for many of the cubs and some of the adults as well. If you and your son have a different sense of humor that's ok, much humor comes from "tribal knowledge" or environment. But you shouldn't exclude yourself from the camp. Plan for it next time, there are so many skits online and in books, find a teaching skit or something more involved for your group and practice it, be prepared for the next campfire. Maybe your example will raise the bar for the others, or at least add some contrast to the others types of skits. Just remember to keep it entertaining somehow or it's just going to be a chit -chat session in the seats.
  4. Longhaired_Mac

    Pre-season Pinewood Derby drama

    We have done basic build activity for reggattas, space, and pinewood derby's during den meetings to help avoid these kind of issues. For the derby cars we will have the cubs design or draw their desired shape on their pine blocks at a den meeting. 1 or two of the dad's will take the stock and cut out the shapes for everyone and then the cubs get their cutouts back the next den meeting. This puts everyone on the same footing as far as access to power tools or parents with woodworking experience. It also makes "competitive" parents happy to have the job of cutting all the cars out. And it keeps them from taking over for their cubs. The committee sets specific rules about axles each race and it goes out in an email from scoutbook. Either all the cars can have straight axles, or sometimes they allow bent axles (rail riders). Paint is done at a den meeting so we know all the cubs have access to painting supplies. Wheels and axles are done at home. None of the car activities take up much time in the den meetings themselves except for the painting. What sanding or fine shaping they do at home with or by dad usually has minimal effect on the outcomes. We have a rule that all weights have to be attached 1 inch in front of the back wheels if it's needed to "make weight." Basicly we incorporate or exclude "tricks" when they are known to help win races so everyone has a fair shake. We have it decided and ready when the cubs get their kits, so well ahead of time. Now no system is perfect, and if a parent really wants to build the car on thier own at home we don't say no. But honestly most super competitive parents that do everything for their kids tend to be target focused and usually miss THE race, and only get to run their cars socially at a rally or recruiting nights. So it all works out. We have had "parent" races. We've had ridiculous fast cars and amazing show cars from those events but they tend to be at blue and gold dinners or for county fair exhibitions. Not at the same time as the cubs.
  5. Longhaired_Mac

    Scouting Magazine - betting the farm on girls

    whining: present participle: complain in a feeble or petulant way That's all I hear out of these conversations about girls in scouts anymore. Whining. Parents and leaders do a lot for scouting but the lack of actual scouts and the funds derived from them dictate the programs and events quality and even longevity more than anything else. So while recruiting may initially go up and give us a lift, it's doubtful Scout retention is going to remain up or down significantly with the adding of girls. Fact is when boys get to a certain age they stop coming to Scouts. The younger ones start "feeling their Oates" and rebel against most anything that resembles responsibility or authority. For older boys it's a job, to earn money to go on dates. Cars, to go on dates. And....Dates. Those aren't the only reasons of course but they probably account for the majority of those who walk away from Scouts. And when the girls are in the same situation they are going to do similarly. Nothing is going to change those social and biological factors. 4% of Scouts make it to Eagle. Girls Scouts equivalent rank to Eagle is the Gold Award and only 5% of the girls earn it. That speaks to the fact that some individuals, boy or girl, will have the drive and desire to set goals and succeed and others won't no matter how much family or SM's push. Period. No amount of scapegoating about possible changes to requirements to placate "female interests" or the ruination of a "boys experience" will change that. National's decision has been made, so accept it and learn how best to move forward. Or quit Scouts and join a different youth group of which there are hundreds if not thousands in the US. Watch out though, most of them are Co-Ed as well.
  6. Longhaired_Mac

    Felon?

    I'm not in your area or situation and only know/understand what's been recounted here. Your choices and lifestyle are your own. Who you date is entirely your business. But the bottom line is most any CM would be responsible and reasonable to error on the side of safety for all the kids. Whether from their own judgement or Parent complaint or Committee directive the CM made a decision and communicated it to you. Now scouter and leadership role aside, this is my thoughts as a concerned parent and honest reaction. Bearess is pointing out something important here. Your timeline of events for your boyfriend is rather quick paced. There is a lot of personal activity going on in relatively short period there that would have me personally question having my child around your boyfriend regardless of a felony conviction. I'm not saying your life has any, but I see a lot of potential for some Springer style drama that as a parent I wouldn't want my son exposed to. To much seemingly forced family making. Add a recent felony conviction and the eyes in the back of my head usually reserved for my son would be lasered in on your boyfriend any time he was around. It may be judgemental and unfair but it's very appropriate in regards to protecting my son. Maybe over time, working with your boyfriend at different events, gaining first hand knowledge of who he is, and trying to live by the Scout law I'd learn to trust him. Now everyone's "normal" is different and what is normal for you and allows you to build trust is not going to be the same for those who have a differing "normal". Some may trust easier, others not so much. But if he isn't going to comply with the CM request and make himself available at other events with you for Pack Parents or leaders to build any trust with him, nothing will change. If he is holding a grudge and is going to show the Pack whats what when his son is a Lion then he's in scouting for the wrong reason and I still wouldn't want him interacting with my son's den. I have long hair and have had it for 20 years....and every time I walk into a church, or my son's teacher conferences, or scouting events I feel the odd disapproving eyes on me and get the snipey sarcastic comments from people. And I smile, get over it and move on because my hair is none of their business. If you want your boyfriend involved for your son's sake then tell him to get over himself and go to what events he can. It's for your son so I assume you would be there anyway, so it won't be that difficult to keep your boyfriend near. Jump through the hoops. all 1,000 of them if that's what's required. Because it's for your son.
  7. My thoughts are that someone along the way made a knee-jerk reply to a Scout to get them to go do more outings, and on second thought believed it was a very good idea after all. Idea became policy, policy becomes tradition, tradition becomes law. Now the current SM may or may not know where and when it started but believes it's how to meet his responsibilities. Armchair psychology says if you press the SM on it he will definitely go on the defensive because, as happens with many of us, he's locked in to a single way of doing things because it has worked so far. If thinking differently about it or some kind of action is required then people can get in a huff. So it comes down to how do you approach the SM on the subject. Honestly I don't think it's your turn to do that just yet unless you really really feel something sketchy is going on. Instead have your son go over his requirements to ensure they are done, then have him approach the subject with the SM. Let him make his own case, explaining he's met the requirements, that he can't attend the next few camp-outs, and if he really needs to press it...that he's read that SM conferences aren't required to be at camp-outs. Hopefully the SM will move forward with the conference or explain himself better. BUT if he doesn't do either then he has at least heard it more than once before you approach him about it. It's not going to be a surprise to him and hopefully he can account for his choice better to you without being defensive. Hopefully. SMC's are some of the first time when Scouts speak to adults as relatively equals. Your son standing up for himself could be as telling as the SMC anyway.
  8. Longhaired_Mac

    Scouting Displays / Display Award

    Our District is doing a membership drive in Sept where multiple Units will be displaying crafts and skills. Our area has a great turnout for the youth building at our County Fair each year as well. Think my son made $18 last year for blue ribbon premiums. Our Blue and Gold is another good time to show off whats been made over the year. Don't have any pics as I stay pretty busy during events.
  9. Longhaired_Mac

    I can't be the only one????

    Tataliya Lodge 614, Grand Columbia Council, Washington
  10. I don't know the details as I haven't seen the article, but...get ready for it...When I was in Scouts I constantly heard the SM and ASM reminding, warning, and generally nagging the older Scouts to get to work, to pay attention to their time qualifications. I was a fairly timid kid and this stressed me out. I was always looking ahead...admittedly I was not the most organized person but I tried to stay on top of things as best I could. Eventually I got my Eagle at 16 and was pretty proud of myself. Having low self-esteem most of those teen years, I felt if I could do it then surely anyone else could. And I had little patience for the older boys whining about how they didn't know what to do or they weren't going to make it. At summer camp when I met my first LDS troop they had a 14 and a 15 year old Eagle. Took me down a peg and really just blew me away. Sometimes it's the individual, sometimes it's the family or troop, but somewhere in the mix you have to have some drive to push past "good enough" and to soar. Cubs have a new book for each rank, Scouts only 1 and all the requirements are in it. Nothing hidden from lower ranks. Disappointment sucks. Rules are rules. He did the work, National made a decision, he is copacetic about it. I'm certain time-management will be at the front of his mind for awhile. But from here out, if he can get that much work done in such a short time I'd want him in OA. That kind of work ethic he could do a lot for the Lodge, maybe earn Vigil before he aged out. Or even after serving as an adviser.
  11. Longhaired_Mac

    Committee Meetings

    I apologize for suggesting a course of action that circumvents appropriate protocol. Obviously I'm ignorant of the Committee side of things and therefore shouldn't have put those 2 cents worth out there.
  12. Longhaired_Mac

    Committee Meetings

    My 2¢ and nothing more. That is a list of the Chairs responsibilities or "Job description" which is not the same as "Administrative Powers or Rights." That said, the simplest way to deal with the problem is to call a committee/parent meeting and vote for a new Chair person, with an explanation why it's needed, and at least 1 person that is for sure willing to take on the work load. Have the vote and see if the grass is greener however it ends up. Your Council might act as a diplomatic go-between if a problem can be pinned down and addressed but more likely will leave the Packs Business to the Pack to deal with. UNLESS it becomes really disruptive and more adults are "Butt-Hurt" than the kids are benefiting from the program.
  13. Longhaired_Mac

    Cub Scout Outdoor Award

    Just a quick note on a conservation idea that's super easy. Mason Bees are very important pollinators and making little houses or Bee Hotels can be quick, easy, and fun even for Lion Dens. You can make them out of old bird houses falling apart, scrap lumbar, or a cleaned up tin can, some rolled up scrap paper, or old garden bamboo canes. The links below give good basic info on why and on how to do it but there are many more ideas on Pinterest. Painting is always the funnest part for the kids. https://baynature.org/article/backyard-boarding-house/ https://www.turningclockback.com/diy-mason-bee-house /
  14. Longhaired_Mac

    Recruiting Resources

    I don't know the particulars but your Council may be limiting you because they can't afford it anymore than your Pack can. Our pack is spearheading a committee for a membership drive in Sept, "Rally in the Valley". We asked Scouters and parents to send in pics from different events and used them to develop our own personalized flier. A parent from our Pack is also translating a Spanish copy for a second flier. We were able to find a local company to donate the paper and printing. Have you asked your committee members or current scout parents what help they might be able to provide? If a business won't cover your printing then perhaps a couple of parents work in places where they are allowed to print for personal use as well as work. With 600 you want to make sure to split that up so it doesn't become a burden to one person. You may want to investigate to see if there is a process you need to follow to get into your schools. Our local Exec had to go before at least 2 school boards to get permission to have our fliers distributed to kids in class. And even with that permission the individual Principals of the various schools can still veto or "lose" fliers. So we are making appointments to visit with the principals to discuss the event and if they won't help we thank them for their time and save the fliers for elsewhere. The generic posters and fliers the council has for us are being saved for Library's and other public spaces as semi-permanent advertising. That might be the best use of yours as well. Class B uniforms in the class on Den meeting or Pack meeting days are great ways to get kids involved too. We actually discussed making some "craft/work" shirts to wear over the uniforms to keep them clean during the meetings but in the end we found our local Scout Office's "trading Post" had many t-shirts on sale from past summer camps or other events. For a $1 a piece the pack bought each of the scouts a Scouting t-shirt to change in to or wear over uniform shirts to stay clean AND can be worn to school without risking Class A uniforms to recces adventures. You might want to check with your local Trading Post or Scout store if you have one and see if you can't do something similar. If all your kids are matching at school it's going to create questions in the other kids which leads to questions about joining up. And then there is always public announcements on radio stations and local TV. Even if the ads aren't during "Prime time" the information will still go out, and on their websites. And Facebook pages, which can then be shared outrageously by Pack members so friends and family see it. A $5 a month paid advert on Facebook for your Pack FB Page (which is as much a recruiting tool as a way to share Pack events & calendar) is well spent priming parents and kids before school even starts. A little Googling of "Advertising for Small Non-Profits" will probably bring up some great tips for you as well.
  15. Longhaired_Mac

    Green Wool Jackets

    Was scouting some OA lodge patches before Fall Fellowship and found this gem...in case anyone is looking at the moment. 1970's BSA Scout "Boys' Life Pedro" Plaid Jac-Shirt, 85% wool 15% nylon, in a Large...which I think is a men's 42" chest. Says it's a vintage Woolrich https://www.ebay.com/itm/Boy-Scouts-Pedro-Executive-Jac-Shirt-Scouting-Tartan-Large-1970s/163173544392
×