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InquisitiveScouter

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Posts posted by InquisitiveScouter

  1. I take flares on week-long canoe treks, especially in Adirondacks...and on every boat outing I've had in coastal waters...never been in the deep blue, but I'll bet they are on every boat at Sea Base...and as stated by others, Sea Scouts use 'em...

    As my OP said, a Scout asked if he could do the road flare to fulfill the requirement.  I have already told him, "yes," and will gladly sign his blue card when he completes the other four ways to attract attention...

    If flare guns are part and parcel of your Scouts' lives, as they are around here, I see no harm in teaching them how to use them safely.

    https://www.allstate.com/resources/allstate/attachments/tools-and-resources/pz-auto-stranded-motorist-jan-2014.pdf

  2. 19 minutes ago, 69RoadRunner said:

    The merit badge is Wilderness Survival.

    I'm willing to bet your definition of "wilderness" and mine are very different...

    Wilderness Survival Merit Badge 1983

    Graduate - USAF Water Survival Training Course October 1990 (renewed every three years until 2014)

    Graduate - USAF Combat Survival Training Course November 1990 (renewed every three years until 2014)

    https://www.fairchild.af.mil/Information/Fact-Sheets/Display/Article/238992/us-air-force-survival-school/

    https://www.baseops.net/militarybooks/usafsurvival.html

    Wilderness First Aid Instructor since 2016

     

  3. If there is one type of boating safety equipment you are unlikely to use until you need it in an emergency, it's pyrotechnic visual distress signals - as in flares, rockets, smoke signals, and other attention getting devices that burn, sputter, smoke or explode.

    The Coast Guard requires most recreational boats 16 feet and larger to carry equipment to signal for assistance an approves two types. Non-pyrotechnic devices are straightforward and include a three-foot-square orange signal flag for day use and for night, an electric light that flashes the international SOS signal 50 to 70 times per minute. (Dye markers and signal mirrors, though useful to attract attention and often carried by boaters, are not Coast-Guard-approved).

    From the stern of a boat, an orange smoke is tested in day light near the Chesapeake Bay Bridge

    In the pyrotechnic category, the regulations are broad and how you fill the requirement for your particular type of boating is fairly flexible. The choices include a variety of red hand-held or aerial flares for day and/or night use, and devices that emit orange smoke for daytime use.

    The Coast Guard sets a 42-month service life and expiration dates are stamped on the devices. The International Maritime Organization approves signals for commercial use on the high seas with a SOLAS (Safety of Life At Sea) rating. These devices far exceed Coast Guard standards for luminosity and many boaters use the more expensive SOLAS devices or the added margin of safety they provide.

    If you opt for pyrotechnics, you must carry three devices approved for day and/or night use but beyond that, you have to mix and match what you wish to carry. By far, pyrotechnics are the popular choice and the majority of boaters opt to meet minimum Coast Guard requirements with hand-held flares or gun-launched meteors that are approved for day/night use.

  4. 5 hours ago, HashTagScouts said:

    true wilderness setting

    You can be in a "true wilderness setting" in your front yard.  Flood waters rising? Tornado rip through your neighborhood and trees are down everywhere? No EMS response within 30 minutes of you?  You are in a survival situation....

    6 hours ago, mashmaster said:

    It is a great time and very much under controlled conditions.

    Concur

  5. All right, Scouters!  Weigh in on this one, please!

    Wilderness Survival Merit Badge has a requirement to "Show five different ways to attract attention when lost."

    A Scout who wishes to complete this badge has asked if he can light a flare, such as those carried in road vehicles, aircraft, and boats.

    I say, "Yes."  These are not classified in our state laws as fireworks.  As long as they are used in accordance with the safety instructions they are sold with, and under adult supervision (for the training and badge), with appropriate precautions to prevent a fire, I think they are fine.

    But that got me to thinking...what about a flare gun?  Also not classified as a firearm.  As long as emergency authorities (our local county emergency dispatch has said they are good with) are notified you will use them...and in accordance with manufacturer safety instructions / adult supervision / open area / fire protection / etc.  I even called the FAA...they are cool with it as long as we issue a Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) so Air Traffic Control knows if it is called in....  easily done...

    We have several people with extensive training on use of these, who will supervise.  I think all the bases are covered...so now I just have to clear it with council...

    Road/marine flare?

    Marine/aircraft flare gun?

    Would you say "no"?  And why?  

    P.S.  Also, wearing gloves, safety glasses, and hearing protection

     

     

  6. 8 minutes ago, Troop75Eagle said:

    The people doing it apparently are do tunnel visioned and hell bent on scouring any validity of the past that there is no thought given or regarded to what the Reasonable alternatives were then, let alone the future.  

    Now you know why the term "mindless rabble" exists

    • Upvote 1
  7. 17 hours ago, Troop75Eagle said:

    Considered bugling too but I’m afraid my wife would wrap it around my neck

    My wife and kids protested at my bugling when I started...you can buy a mute that helps...nothing flashy...just a $10-15 model from Amazon.

    Go in a room, close the door, use the mute, and you will keep the peace ;)

    • Upvote 1
  8. 20 minutes ago, walk in the woods said:

    mob won't be satisfied

    Who controls the past, controls the future: who controls the present, controls the past… The mutability of the past is the central tenet of Ingsoc. Past events, it is argued, have no objective existence, but survive only in written records and in human memories. The past is whatever the records and the memories agree upon. And since the Party is in full control of all records, and in equally full control of the minds of its members, it follows that the past is whatever the Party chooses to make it.

    Orwell, 1984

    • Like 1
    • Upvote 2
  9. 17 minutes ago, TAHAWK said:

    rock through the window

    Yes, it is about feeling powerless, and seeing that store as someone else's wealth/power to be destroyed.  If I cannot join you in your prosperity, I will destroy yours to even the playing field.

     

    19 minutes ago, TAHAWK said:

    Drive-by murders of fellow inhabitants

    Turf control to sell drugs...

     

    19 minutes ago, TAHAWK said:

    Hitting a 92-year-old woman in the face at random

    I think you are right here...mental illness may be the issue

    • Upvote 1
  10. 56 minutes ago, TAHAWK said:

    problem of violence with no rationalization

    All about wealth and/or power...which is why those two things always concentrate together...

    Have wealth...get power

    Have power...get wealth

    Now, there are many who use either or both for good, but that is a relatively new phenomenon in history

    • Like 1
  11. Unable to view the opinion piece...no WaPo subscription.

    Since the letter was broadcast, I have had conversations with experienced local Scouters who see the BSA's letter as (their words) "pandering", "bandwagon", "a PR stunt", "an attempt to remain relevant", "inflammatory", etc.

    Although most understand the intentions behind the letter, there is general sentiment that BSA should have simply reinforced existing parts of the program which apply.  Most also agree this will probably be the end of the DRP, or BSA risks another label of hypocrisy.

    • Upvote 1
  12. 4 minutes ago, MattR said:

    What does it take to sew canvas or typical tent fabric?

    Ask five lawyers a question and you get seven different opinions ;)

    Recommend you contact your local canvas shop (or canvas repair shop).  They can give you some good advice.  Send them that diagram and ask for a quote to make the tent.  We'd all be curious as to how much they'd ask...

    If done by hand (depending on thickness)...  recommend a thimble

     

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