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Scoutmaster Minutes

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Inspirational stories and meaningful remarks to share

208 topics in this forum

  1. Shades of gray

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  2. The Bird

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  3. Sportsmanship

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  4. What's Important

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  5. A Scout has Integrity

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  6. 100 Scouts

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  7. Safe Swim

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  8. 13%

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  9. Holiday Minutes

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  10. No regrets

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  • LATEST POSTS

    • I think that if you start looking at the G2SS and trying to justify exceptions you are going to get yourself all twisted up in knots.   I think @David CO said it well - the one-on-one rules in the G2SS will require you and your family to stop doing things that have been a normal part of life for many years - sleepovers, baby sitting, being one-on-one with your niece or nephew.  I suspect that the BSA knows this, but wanted to be show leadership in this space.  As such, they have set a very high bar.  If you are a leader in the BSA, you should live your whole life according to the rules in the G2SS.  Most will say it's to protect the BSA in lawsuits and they are probably right.  I'm a bit of an optimist and simply hope it's that the BSA got tired of having always getting blamed.  As a result, they decided to set a high bar. I think they've carved out an exception or two out of fear of losing whole categories of people - like teachers.  But, I don't expect to see an ever increasing list of exception cases.  While the exception cases would make it easier for people to live by the G2SS, it would do so by watering down the protection it provides.  I don't tink the BSA wants to water down their rules at this point in time.
    • Come to think of it: babysitting could be considered a “career.” My son has babysitting duties as part of what pays his room and board at my house. If he wanted to volunteer (he doesn’t) that shouldn’t be a barrier to doing so. 
    • Yes, EXCEPT tenting outside of Cub Scouts.
    • I never said not to share opinions.  Just that this wasn’t what I was looking for. I’m not inclined to dictate what people can and cannot post in reply. Opinions are at least interesting.    The policy, as you state, is clear and doesn’t give exceptions, even logical ones. But the FAQ definitely makes a few exceptions, and in the example of a sleepover, it says “if” the friend is a Scout then the policy should be followed.    Fortunately we have 3 adults in our household and 2 of us are registered Scouters. But I have no issue abiding by the example in the FAQ. We recently had a Scout come over for a sleep-over, but because her mom (also a Scouter) is single if my daughter were going over to their house I would stay over too in order to comply. I’m fine with that.    The challenge I’m having is where in between the “this is the exception” and “this is the rule” should the line be drawn. Clearly the BSA intends us to make exceptions. I’m interested in whether they’ve documented anything to tell us where the line is, as they’ve only given us two examples of exceptions. 
    • Don't fall for it.  The council doesn't have the authority.  The council can't force a Chartered Organization to accept anyone in their unit.  If the parent doesn't like your unit, invite them to go elsewhere.
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