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Working with Kids

Counseling, inspiring and teaching kids.


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  1. troop transfer

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  2. Unexpected rewards

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  3. Fun or not fun

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  4. eagle

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  5. Who's responsible? 1 2

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  6. Trouble with Scout

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  • LATEST POSTS

    • That is exactly the kind of approach that is needed. I don't see where the system worked here other than at the most minimal level. 
    • I have always electected to wear the uniform in accordance with BSA rules, to the extent that they are coherent.  Even the rule that official BSA "hat pins" may not be worn on the official BSA hat or cap. In training, I have advocated to Scouts and adults that they set a good example by following the rules. I do not "call out" adults who ignore the uniforming rules because they may simply be unaware of the rules and because we have been increasingly short of adult resources over my fifty-three years in the program.   I have "solved" the absurd Eagle Mentor Pin problem by buying, second-hand, an official BSA blazer for Courts of Honor.
    • There are, as is obvious, two systems. Right? One before and one after. I would argue, there must be three. The YPT part, the criminal investigation and the BSA investigation and reporting part. In this abuse context, #2 seems to have been engaged. We don’t know if it can be said to have “worked” until further down the road.  In addition to the failure of #1, I’m keen to learn what happens with #3 Or not. How deeply into the backstory of the “means and opportunity” of this abuse will the examination delve, not just by law enforcement? What of all the ancillary human factors that made it possible? Did he know there would be sexual activities, apparently including CSA, going on where he set up his camera? Pretty coincidental. Were there others who were secondarily or primarily involved in means, opportunity and/or perpetration? Did they collaborate? Were kids encouraged or dared to have sex in there? It definitely happens. If so, who said what to whom? If this was a known spot, was it historic? Single incident? This sort of secret knowledge can be passed down from year to year. It’s not uncommon. Having ALL of this information is what can save children this horror going forward. Not, “Whew! We caught him. Thank God that’s over.”
    • Feminine hygiene products were available at the trading posts both at Philmont and our local Council camp this summer.
    • It was briefly brought up in the Q & A at a Cub recruiting night the first year we enrolled girls in the Cub Scout program.  The most honest answer we could give was that we take the safety and well being of every Scout, male or female, very seriously.  We always do everything in our power to ensure that nothing like this will happen, but the best way for that parent to help us do that would be to register and participate along with his daughter. As to this particular incident, I saw the news reports several days ago.  While I was disheartened to see it happened, I was pleased to see that as soon as it was discovered it was reported to authorities, and the perpetrator was arrested.  As was mentioned earlier in this thread, zero incidents is a laudable goal, but probably not realistic.  There is however, a difference between zero incidents and zero tolerance.  In this case it appears the system worked the way it should have.  Something happened, and as soon as discovered was reported, resulting in an arrest.
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