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dsteele

How did YOU come to be involved in the BSA?

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. . . And what recruiting lesson can be learned from it? Did you join as a youth or an adult?

 

Unc.

 

PS -- This is the first time I have seen no topics under "Open Discussion" in the Today's active topics list.

 

UG

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I went thru Cubs and dropped out as a Webelos.

 

As an adult, I got involved because my son wanted to go to a School Night and decided he wanted to join Cubs. He is now a Boy Scout. Where he goes, Dad seems to follow. :)

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My hubby and I were already involved in Girl Scouts, so when it came time for my son to join Cubs it was a natural. The CM asked & we said yep. We asked another mom in the den to help

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My hubby and I were already involved in Girl Scouts, so when it came time for my son to join Cubs it was a natural. The CM asked & we said yep. We asked another mom in the den to help and off we went.

 

BTW - When it came time for our other leader's 2nd son to enter Cubs she took that den along with another of our mom's who also had a son the same age!

 

 

 

 

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I answered an ad in the UK Scouting Magazine.

"..... And what recruiting lesson can be learned from it?"

Beware of what you ask for.

You can't trust them darn Limeys.

Some people never know when it's time to go home.

Eamonn.

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As a youth, I was too young to know any different.

As a young adult, I had had grown to enjoy the program and wanted to continue.

As an older adult, I didn't care to learn new tricks.

and today, I am glad I didn't.

 

What value for recruitment?

Good program is essential.

 

FB

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It all began about 30-some years ago. My mom was my Brownie leader and my dad was a helper (he did any lifting and driving needed). My brother joined Cubs shortly after I joined Brownies, and my mom helped out (not sure of her role) and my dad became a committee member. Over the years, I went camping a lot, and I LOVED it. That was with Girl Scouts. During that time frame, our entire family went to pack meetings (which I recall fondly--such fun!) and then to COHs (also memorable--particularly Eagle for my brother). In looking back, what immediately comes to mind is: (1) BSA was all about families while at the same time teaching boys to become independent strong men, (2) full of ceremonies--I recall lots of fires and candles and Native American lore!, (3) and included lots of outdoor activities--the stories my father and brother would bring home are still vividly remembered by me. They did more camping than I did. The family outdoor events included an annual hayride, and that was great fun--especially when I was dating the boys in my brother's troop ;) No one was surprised that I married a Boy Scout!

 

Today, what I hope to bring to the BSA is those things that I have listed: family time, ceremonies, outdoor time with skills instruction, fun and adventure. How to do that? Fuzzy Bear said it: program! I didn't know there were lessons tucked into all that fun, and I wasn't even a Boy Scout, but I learned nevertheless, and I hope to see that continue on. Today, I am a Scouter because I have sons who I hope will grow into fine young men with the help of the opportunities they have in the BSA. My husband and I each come from folded troops, and we have made a commitment to remaining leaders and ensuring that our sons will have a troop for as long as they remain in Scouts.

 

And I suspect we'll stick around after that too if welcomed and able to continue serving. My dad did--he's now the IH of the units my brother was member of, and he has grandsons in those units. This past year I recruited about 5 adult leaders, have several more interested, and it is because of all that I just shared with you. I made it my goal to get to know our families and then to let them know how the program goes far beyond simply fun and how they can be part of it too. Winning the parents over keeps the boys -- now we hope to add to that number.(This message has been edited by Laurie)

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Well, there I was, being 8 years old (there were no Tigers then) with a father who had been a Boy Scout and then a Scouter since HE was 12, and was at that time a Scoutmaster, and... well, I'm not sure how many recruiting lessons can be learned from that.

 

As an adult, I registered my son in Tigers because it seemed like a good idea at the time, though at that point I had no intention of becoming a leader. After suffering through 2 years of poor den leaders who basically turned a den of 10 into a den of 3, I decided it was time to step up and take my turn. Later I became Assistant Cubmaster. I guess I was recruited by the method of "Is there someone here who is willing to take a leadership role so these boys can continue in the program?" And there was.

 

When my son crossed over to a troop, so did I, as a committee member.

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I was a Cub Scout and made it to Tenderfoot as a Boy Scout before quitting for sports. When our son was going into First Grade my wife came home from a Parent Teacher meeting and said some one from Cub Scouts talked to them and that this would be something good for our son. That was 11 years ago and at first I didn't want to be a leader, but ended up being his Den Leader, Webelos Leader, CubMaster, and when he crossed over Assistant ScoutMaster and now ScoutMaster. He made Eagle Scout last year and is now an Assistant Scoutmaster. I also serve on the district Cub Scout Round Table and District Committee.

 

The recruiting lesson I learned over the years is you will find a small number of people who really want to help and those who run away as soon as you mention you are looking for Leaders.

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I got involved as Tiger Cub Partner with my son. My brothers were both Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts and I was always envious. I wanted my son to enjoy some of the things my brothers got to do. When he became a Wolf, a Den Leader was needed, so I stepped up. I moved from Den Leader to Assistant Cubmaster to Cubmaster, served on Day Camp Staff, served on the District Training Team and then when my son moved up to Boy Scouts, I joined teh Troop Committee and Agreed to serve as our District Training Chair for Cub Scouts.

 

Recruiting lesson? Look for the biggest sucker you can find?

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My son and I were invited to go to a PWD with his friend and dad. My son joined as a Wolf, and two years later I became the Cubmaster. Now I'm a double dipper (Troop Committee and WDL) and loving it all. Looking forward to next year when my younger son crosses into the troop and I can wear just a single hat again.

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When my son was a Wolf, I attended the pack meeting as a parent. The pack meeting were booring & not well attended. I talked to some people & got the "It's only an hour a week" line & signed on as Cubmaster. That was in 1988 & I'm still here!

 

Ed Mori

Troop 1

1 Peter 4:10

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As a boy, my dad (a second generation Eagle scout) got me going to Cubs, before I knew what happened, I was an Eagle Scout.

 

Shortly after my son was born, his mom and I divorced. I was very concerned about him and honestly made a deal with God. If He'd take care of my son, I'd find something good to get involved with. That afternoon I ran into a guy that was the District Commissioner. He told me it would only take 3 hours a month. (Visits to Units, and a monthly meeting).

 

A few years later, I became the founding SM for a troop. A few years after that, I was thrilled my son came to live with me (so all the effort I did so God would bless him meant that my son would benefit directly from my efforts). Then a job transfer, a new community, and a new Scouting job. This time as Founding Committee Chair.

 

All the while I have served on District/Council/Regional positions. I don't know what I'd have done without Scouts.

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As a kid growing up in New York City, there wasn't much to do but get in trouble. The few sports teams around were only for the really good athlets. Everyone else joined scouts. It was a way to get out of the city and away from parents. Joined with my friends in 6th grade as a boy scout and just stuck with it. Most of my friends are still in the same troop althoug I moved away.

 

When my son became tiger age, I figured he could just join a den and I would hang out as commissioner. Well, now I am cubmaster. I was given the job because, "If you can do better then you do it!" Besides, the first thing our committee chair asked was if I was a scout. Made me feel guilty and thus sucked me into unit leadership. Best thing to ever happen to me in scouts.

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