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CubsRgr8

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Everything posted by CubsRgr8

  1. The religious emblem medals are NOT scout awards, so I say go ahead and wear it on the uniform.
  2. My sons' troop has run its own summer camp for 40 years plus. I have attended nine summers and love going. Here are some things I think are key to making it work: 1) We have a stand-alone state group campsite all to ourselves. 2) There's a theme (lumberjacks, Robin Hood, etc.) that ties together the activities planned over the course of the week and provides the basis for earning Honor Patrol status. 3) There's a craft tent for rainy days, a waterfront for sunny days, and a couple of half-day out-of-camp activities (5 mi hike, forestry site visit, etc.) so nobody goes stir-crazy. 4) Scouts cook most of their breakfasts and dinners by patrol while lunch is a simple chow lines of sandwiches, etc. while adults cook and eat their own meals. Some things I think I would change: 1) Offer more merit badges that tie directly into the theme, while dropping anything that is not outdoors or theme related - like the three CITs or Communications. 2) Go later in the summer so the new scout patrols (we usually have two) will have camped at least three times in advance. 3) Add a couple of advanced activities (i.e. two night canoe trips) for the older scouts.
  3. There is no doubt in my mind that a troop's culture is driven by the leaders. Given that most COs, CORs, and CCs do not have any particular vision for the troop they sponser, most often the leader I'm referring to is the scoutmaster. Why is that? Who attends the meetings, the campouts, the week at summer camp? The scoutmaster. Who knows all the boys' names, where they go to school, how things are at home? The scoutmaster. A new scoutmaster comes in and he has ideas about troop culture that drives how things will happen during his tenure. Changing a culture that doesn't seem to be working well? That's pretty simple, change the scoutmaster.
  4. koolaidman, thanks for the link to NBC, that adds a lot of information to the story. To answer bear dad's original question, yes, it's fair. It's fair for BSA to uphold its membership requirements. The scout chose to inform BSA that "he does not agree to Scoutings principle of 'Duty to God' and does not meet Scoutings membership standard on sexual orientation." So, he chose to cross the Rubicon twice. Actions have consequences and he had to have known what the consequences are for a member who refuses to accept BSA's membership requirements.
  5. In reading the article the scout proactively notified his Eagle councilor that he has issue with duty to god and btw I am gay too.... The link posted by bear dad does not include any mention of DTG. Where did you find that?
  6. Random thoughts. I do get tired of stories with gross inaccuracies - the scoutmaster does NOT award the Eagle, so he cannot possibly prevent it being awarded to a scout. Fair? If the facts as presented are accurate, it certainly is not fair for a scoutmaster to (apparently) deny a scout his Eagle scoutmaster conference - for any reason. If a scoutmaster won't conduct the scoutmaster conference - for any reason, stated or unstated - the scout can and should go to his District advancement committee. Did the scout and mom really think splashing this on Yahoo News would help? Now he has crossed the Rubicon and labled himself a "self-avowed homosexual". (This message has been edited by CubsRgr8)
  7. It's sad to see "your" camp run down and on the chopping block. Make sure that 100% of proceeds from the sale of the property are encumbered to the development of the new camp. Don't let the money be used to pay the SE a bonus or any other such nonsense. Also, check out if perhaps the existing Cub World can be relocated to the portion of the overall site that has the most history.
  8. Uhg. Cold food is a big, red warning light that proper food handling was not in place, making the danger of food poisoning extremely high. If this was my banquet, I'd send a polite letter (not email, they're too easy to ignore) to: The Lodge Key Three (Chief, Advisor, Staff Advisor), the Scout Executive (the Supreme Chief of the Fire), and the Banquet committee chair. That said, the other short-comings are easily addressed - never use that facility again. But for $15, I'm guessing this was catered by volunteers in a church basement. Then it's up to the event chairman (who is a youth, right?) to be better trained by his adult adviser on how to run a banquet.(This message has been edited by CubsRgr8)
  9. I agree that OA activities and visibility vary significantly from lodge to lodge. I, too, wish my lodge was more visible and more integrated into council, district and unit activities. However, I recognize that the lodge is what it is because the Scout Executive is the Supreme Chief of the Fire. If she only sees the lodge as "free labor for BSA to set up/take down summer camp at council scout camps", then that what the it be. If he delegates all responsibility to the staff advisor, then it's the staff advisor's vision that shapes the lodge. Anyone agree with me?
  10. I NEVER camped or scouted (?) when I was a kid, so I didn't know jack when I became a WDL. Training and the internet were my friends and opened up the world of scouting to this city slicker. Put together a two year plan that incorporates as many outdoor activities (day hikes, day camp, camporees, joint activities with Troops) as possible. ABSOLUTELY have your den attend a Webelos 4 day/3 night resident camp between 4th & 5th grades - this summer if at all possible. If you're anywhere in the Midwest, Camp Rokolio (Bay Lakes Council) or Akela's World (Samoset Council) have fantastic reputations. Feel free to PM me if you have any specific questions.
  11. Lodges will not be allowed to die by the staff adviser as long as Quality Lodge rubrics are number based (Brotherhood conversion rate, membership growth, etc.) and Quality Lodge is one of his annual performance evaluation factors. Therefore, adults are recruited to "cover" the critical functions (elections, induations, etc.) and end up running them. In six years, I have yet to see ANY activity/event fail or be cancelled due to poor youth leadership and, frankly, many of them should have failed.
  12. Since this is a Milwaukee troop, here's the link to the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel's article about this tempest in a teacup. http://www.jsonline.com/news/milwaukee/milwaukee-boy-scout-troops-border-patrol-patch-causes-ire-3b50ads-147414825.html Funny how the same paper somehow wasn't able to mention that this same troop celebrated having seven eagle scouts at a special ceremony at the War Memorial last November.
  13. Here's a better link to the LDS webpage about Cub Scouting: http://www.lds.org/service/serving-in-the-church/primary/leader-resources/scouting-in-primary?lang=eng
  14. Well written. ^^^ Few things aggravate me more than parents of Cub Scouts who think BSA stands for Baby Sitters of America. I've personally seen it in both Catholic parish and public school Packs and am certain it pops up in every Pack at one time or another. It all comes down to the Charter Organization making the effort to educate the parents right up front, before their sons join the Pack. If I understand correctly, your service as a den leader is considered a religious calling and you do not have the right to tell parents that their kids either "shape up or ship out!" Even so, there is nothing on the LDS website page about Cub Scouting (http://www.lds.org/service/serving-in-the-church/primary/leader-resources/scouting-in-primary/cub-scouting?lang=eng&query=scouting) that says you are expected to be a patsy and suck it up. My brief review of the webpage also finds that the Church expects the Pack to be organized and run just like any other Pack, with some minor LDS specific variants. That includes scout behavior and parent support/participation. I suggest you contact the unit's COR, explain the situation to him, and request that he back you up in communicating expectations to the parents. This would be best done with all parents simultaneously, perhaps after a religious service, to avoid anyone from feeling singled out. If the COR is unreceptive, then go up the ladder. Unfortunately, if that doesn't help, then I suggest you not worry about tailoring the program to attract more kids and instead provide a program the conforms the BSA standards and pleases the kids who do show up.
  15. That's great news and I'm glad you posted. I'd like to hear about some of the strategies you used to grow the Pack, the ones that worked best and the one that didn't. A success story like this needs to be shared.
  16. The personal request method really does work best. In your case, even if the CO is a stand away type, ask the COR to sit down with you and the CC over a cup of coffee. Tell the COR that you're not trying to change the relationship, but ask the COR to brainstorm with you about what traits a CM needs. Then the three of you come up with three names each, from in the CO, in the Pack, and in the community. Evaluate them together and then recruit the top candidate. If they say no, go on the next one on the list, remembering that when you meet with them, they are the top candidate identified. After you have a CM, then go back to the top of the list and recruit two ACMs. Does this sound feasible?
  17. K1986, you are under no obligation to put up with this BS from either the scout or his parents AND it's not your job to fix it. I suggest you explain the situation to both the CC and the COR privately in person today. Provide them with specific examples that can be collaborated by other adults. Then the CC should ask the family to meet with the three of you privately where the CC lays out the problem and informs them that it stops today, or their son is no longer a member of the Pack. If the parents put up a fuss, then the CC hands them a previously filled in transfer form and wishes them well in their search for another unit.
  18. Should we try to move back towards encouraging (public) schools to be COs or would BSA have to make to(o) many concessions for that? In a word - NO. School administrations are too scared of lawsuits to allow BSA units do what makes the BSA uniquely successful at attracting and retaining boys - provide an outdoor program designed just for them. Schools would require the rapid elimination of anything to do with guns, knives, arrows, tent camping, cooking (fire is dangerous!), etc. No, let's not go down the road of trying to make BSA fit in with the nanny mentality that runs so many of our public schools, regardless of whether or not BSA changes its rules about the three Gs. Don't want to deal with a religious CO? Then talk to your local Rotary or Lions club, or set up your own non-profit LLC.
  19. Frustrating, yes, but I'll wager that most people don't check the expiration date before putting their bags out on the porch. As far as sorting and leaving the unacceptable stuff on the porch, it's just not feasible if you want to be done collecting in a reasonable amount of time.
  20. Our councils merged in October and we're supposed to merge the lodges within 18 months, although I expect it will probably be sooner than that. I'd like to hear the good, the bad, and the ugly about any lodge mergers involving you. Thanks.
  21. CubsRgr8

    Blue and Gold

    Food: pizza, fried chicken, veggie catered for ~$8/ea. Entertainment: magician, Comedy Sports, Mad Scientist, etc. after dinner Prizes: yes, every kid gets one, but they're never very big. Advancement: regular, AOL if they've earned it, but never cross-over - that's a separate event in March. Committee: in September, the Webelos 2 parents are told, "it's your sons' last B&G, what do you want to do?" Theme: see "Committee" above.
  22. (sung to the tune of On, Wisconsin!) Forward, Packers! Forward, Packers! Plunge right through that line! Run the ball right through the Giants A touchdown sure this time. (U rah rah) Forward, Packers! Forward, Packers! Fight on for more fame Fight! Fellows! - fight, fight, fight! We'll win this game. Foolish Giants, don't they know what happens to those who dare enter the Frozen Tundra? Go Pack, Go!
  23. Two weeks ago, on very short notice, I conducted a troop's OA election. The SM, SPL and one other scout in a troop of 24 are already members. The SM identified 9 scouts as eligible - 3 asked to be removed from the ballot before I had completed the presentation! Yikes! It's going to take a lot of something to overcome that kind of disinterest.
  24. The end of a lad's journey as a scout should never be about Eagle. It should be about friendships and good times had, and lookin' back at how much he's learned and lookin' forward to where he's goin' to take those lessons. How true! I purposely did not follow up with the Scout after our meeting because I wanted him to decide what to do. As it turns out, he decided that he really doesn't want to leave the Troop and his friends, even if it means giving up on Eagle. He's a great kid and I'm humbled that he thought to ask my advice earlier this month. I tell you, Scouting has given back so much more to me than I have ever given it.
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