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How many adults

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Im wondering how many adults do troops take on camping trips? In my case I try to only have 4 adults maximum, 2 male and 2 females. Often I prefer to have myself with just one additional adult (female) if the crew is involved. The SPL etc. are in charge and using them doesnt leave much room for adults.

 

Ive noticed that as parents come in from the cub pack they think they should be camping and going on trips when in fact theyre not invited. They work with the committee or advancements etc. but only leaders are allowed on camping trips (our troop). Leaders have to be trained so that solves that issue. But, by reading these messages and talking to other troops, Im wondering why there as many adult issues on outings when actually there should only be two adults on the campout?

 

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I have always encouraged any parent or legal guardian who wanted to come on an outing to come. Scouting is a family program and some lifetime memories and relationships can be developed during a scout outing.

 

You are right about the boys needing to be in control. The adults have their own campsite, do their own cooking and are taught by the troop leadership to stay out of the management of the patrols and troop.

 

They are there to relax, enjoy the outdoors, watch their sons develop and share moments around the campfire. We often have about 2 adults for every 6 scouts.

 

Bob White(This message has been edited by Bob White)

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We have 1 adult for every 5 to 6 boys. But always have two ( of course) we have had as many as 5 at summer camp before. I think that the more camping together the adults do with their son will only enhance the relationship.

 

Never turn away a parent willing to help. Get them trained, if they want to attend campouts and activities.

 

I must agree with Bob White that Scouting is a family event. We have often had siblings come on outings before, because we needed another adult and that was our way of getting them for the weekend a 2 for 1 deal.

 

You may be cheating the boys by limiting the adult participation and missing out on some good late night campfires with new friends.

 

Cheryl

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I am not aware of any situation in the units with which I have been affiliated where participation by adults was restricted. More often the opposite problem of inadequate adult supervision has arisen. We have discussed limiting adult participation only where total headcount limits were in place, such as for Philmont, or various back country permits.

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The more adults the better, the lack of adults can only limit your program. If an adult starts attending camping and hiking trips they are usually willing to take the training. If you have 4 or more adults on wilderness trips just get 2 permits and camp in 2 areas along the trail when necessary. That way you can take 2x the scouts.

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Our Scoutmaster actively discourages parents (and will NEVER consider siblings) from attending all but one outing. That outing is lodge camping in January with the Webelos and he makes it very clear he wants only Dads (& not to many of those). For regular camping trips he asks for drivers but they are not allowed to stay. They drive (sometimes as much as 1.5 hrs) unload and drive (another 1.5 hrs) back home. Then when it is time to come home they are expected to drive out and back again. Then he yells at the parents at COA because he has to cancel camping trips due to lack of drivers! Well DUH!

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In our troop, we took 62 kids to camp and had 14-18 adults at any one time with 12 staying all weeek.

 

On most campouts we have 25-30 kids with 8-10 adults. ScoutNut, you are in an unhealthy situation, the scoutmaster cant dictate who stays with your child any more than I can.

 

I dont see how you can restrict adult involvement, whether trained or not, Boy Scouts is supposed to be and open program.

 

How many adults? as many that want to come. We may space ourselves out in the camp, but we cook and function as a patrol, normally the "Ol'Buzzards"

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Our troop doesn't have a problem with parents coming as long as there aren't space problems such as numbers of canoes, etc.

 

 

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Our troop welcomes any and all parents who wish to attend. While camping, the boys are exptected to function within their own patrol. No parent is allowed to "take over" but if they wish to help the newer scouts (help pitch a tent, etc.) they are not discouraged.

 

Our Scoutmaster will eventually ask the parents to get training if they regularly attend the campouts. But he does not require this before they camp with the troop.

 

We find this is the best way to get willing drivers. If I was asked monthly to drive 6 hours over the weekend without the benefits of camping, I don't believe I would remain with the Troop very long.(This message has been edited by Glenn)

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Scouts and Scout leaders camp parents visit some may visit for the lenght of the camp and their help in setting up camp and running bases is welcome but they shouldn't be allowed to do jobs that would normally be done by the scouts. Day Hikes and outings are a different matter and I'm quite happy to have whole families along for the day provided they understand that they are reponsible for their siblings who aren't in the scout movement. Leaders are responsible for the scouts.

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My son's troop lets parents camp. If siblings are brought along, they are the responsibility of the parents and should not be in the way. The only sibling I've seen brought along is a Webelos brother. He is part of the adult patrol for eating and sleeping. During scout free time he hangs out with the older boys, he is mature and can hold his own with the big guys.

 

I would not drive 6 hours on a weekend if I can't stay to camp. For some of us going camping showed us how independent our children are. I only hear from my son if he wants money. The campout I did go on, I told him "Mom is not here".

 

The experienced adults may need to watch the new parents and suggest things for them to do to keep them from hovering around the boys and wringing their hands. Let the parents know in advance what the camping routine is -- tarps up first, then tents, then free time, when is lights-out, when is breakfast, etc. Let them know what they should and should not be helping the boys with. A recent campout that I did not go on, one married couple went and spent the day doing something different than the troop. They enjoyed that and it worked out well.

 

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I would never, under any circumstance, limit the number of adults who wish to camp with us. From these parents come your future committee members and leaders. This year we had 19 scouts and 9 adults at summer camp. A few years ago when we were in a down time we had 9 scouts and 8 adults at camp!When you limit the adults and do not invite them to share the Scouting experience you will eventually be cancelling activities due to lack of parental participation. I also think it helps the boys as they get to know more adults who may have new ideas and new talents to share with the group.

THE MORE THE MERRIER!!

 

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Well, as you can tell by my original post, I limit the adults. But thats our program. I like Bobs comments about the Family Program. Ive never, in over ten years, had to cancel an outing because of lack of adults. So limiting the adults is not an issue. But, what I have found is that adults listen less than the kids and Im running a youth program therefore limiting adults is how we achieve that. Now we do ask adults to be guest, once or twice, then they have to be trained leaders. I have no problem with a large group of adults being trained and willing to go, but from that group I would ask no more than 4 to participate. I have no need for adults to accompany any campout, maybe its me, but 4 adults and 30-60 scouts havent caused problems. But, when I have 10 adults, I have an adult patrol which isnt what our program is about. I dont care how many want to go, I just need 4 maximum and they can take turns going if they like.

 

As far as siblings go, been there done that, not again. In our program, we do scout activities and siblings and other family members detract from that (day hikes and events are different). Every so often we do a family campout, but other than that they are not allowed (unless theyre eligible to join in which case they can go as a guest to see if they would like to join).

 

 

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"Well, as you can tell by my original post, I limit the adults. But thats our program"

 

Yeah, that may be your program, but I resent you masquerading it as a Boy Scouts of America Troop.

 

Having a closed program and restricting adults has no place in BSA, its supposed to be an open program where parents can drop in any time to see what we are doing with their sons.

 

It may work for you, but again, its not the Boy Scout way

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