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  2. Cburkhardt

    Advice for a new CC

    The results of the Troop coffee fundraiser are in, and we netted $7,600 to surpass our goal of $4,000. We probably have another $500 to come in from some stragglers. On top of this we received $6,000 from some institutional sources, so we have what we need to greatly subsidize the costs of our under-resourced families and their girls in our 30-Scout Troop. We will use some for some equipment purchases and make a Friends of Scouting contribution to our local council (something like $1,500). The rest we will save to begin building our long-term fund for stability. Thanks to everyone for the many good suggestions. We used every one of them. Note to Liz: There is no girl-specific Web Site template out there at this point. We wrote ours from scratch after we figured out how we would operate. Then we did our best to determine what an 11-13 year old girl and her parents would want to know about that implementation and wrote to that specific interest in our very-urban environment. We talk directly to that girl except for my “Scoutmaster’s Letter” to the parents — but even that is very specific to our urban all-girl implementation. I will say the writing of the site turned out to be the way we ended up understanding our challenges and deciding how the Troop would launch and operate. The site has been a huge hit. Our new parents love it because it is beginner-friendly and explains the basics without using any Scouting lingo or abbreviations. While not relevant to our use of our site, it is interesting to note that it has been viewed by 2.2K discrete visitors since going active on October 1, 2018, including viewers from 40 countries. Maybe this is just a typical result for troop web sites — I just don’t know.
  3. Today
  4. In my experience there are several factors as to why young adults do not stick around. College is indeed a big one. One issue I faced when I was under 25 was that other adults refused to view me as a fellow adult with the same knowledge, abilities, and skills that they had. As a 21 year old OA chapter advisor, that was a big issue with others on the district committee I sat with. I was either told I don't know what i'm talking about, or ignored all together. I had to use my allies on the committees to get my ideas across fro the benefit of the Scouts. Worse case was the SM who wanted me to alter the troop's OA election results. He actually followed me into the parking lot, cursing me out and saying I had no idea what I was doing in the OA. But the #1 factor I see now affects the 18-20 year olds, and we need to keep them active. The problem is thatr National no longer counts them as adults in regards to YP guidelines. I remember the stink that happened when National tried to implement the policy immediately, and troops started complaining to the councils and HA bases because they would have to cancel trips because they were relying on the 18-20 y.o. ASMs as the 2nd adult. If the young adults do not believe National trusts them as adults, why should they stick around?
  5. Jameson76

    New troop. New opportunity. Advice?

    Read Green Bar Bill Hillcourt's books. That will help
  6. There are older brothers of our scouts, with great skills that they learned in scouting, that I would like to tap to help with our Scouts BSA girls -- were they not away from home attending college. There are also older cousins, male and female, in their twenties, with Eagle Scout and Venturing backgrounds, that I would love to tap to help out -- except that they live out of state. We live in a town which people leave at age 18. And to which people move at around age thirtyish, already married, and either with preschool children, or thinking about soon having children.
  7. Treflienne

    Advice for a new CC

    The www.ScoutsBsaDcGirls.org website is great! Our troop ended up going with using the services provided by bsahosting.org Our committee member who was looking into this liked that the website came with email lists for the troop with a reasonable privacy policy that did not involve selling our data. They have a template troop website that a troop can customize.
  8. shortridge

    New troop. New opportunity. Advice?

    To clarify: We have no existing traditions, no old guard, no ingrained practices. This is effectively a clean slate to start from, posing a unique and interesting opportunity.
  9. Yesterday
  10. elitts

    Real estate donation

    One of the issues that will be relevant is the payment of property taxes. If the property isn't held for exempt purposes, the annual taxes will have to come out of someone's pocket. It would probably be worth speaking with a tax lawyer to figure out how to get around that part, then decide where to go from there.
  11. Liz

    Country Meats

    We don't live in an area that has a strong cultural support of Scouts. There are individuals who will pay/buy anything of course; but as a rule we wouldn't have a chance of having a single Scout selling $1,000 worth of popcorn. We definitely have that opportunity with the candy and meat sticks we sell instead. I lived in a different Council when my older kids were in Scouts. In particular, we lived in an area that had a stronger support of Scouting than the general area the Council covered. We participated in popcorn sales but didn't earn enough to make a dent in our yearly fundraising goals. My kids would go door to door and collect maybe $60 in outright donations if they were lucky and maybe one person would order some popcorn, necessitating another trip out to deliver it. They'd go door to door in the same neighborhood a couple months later taking orders for Christmas Wreaths and bring in a ton of money. For a couple of years, we started selling a local eco-friendly coupon book alongside the popcorn fundraiser. The kids did MUCH better when they could walk up to the door and say "Would you like to buy some popcorn or would you prefer this $20 coupon book?" We went through cases of those coupon books. The only people who bought popcorn were the occasional Scouting family who kind of considered it a tradition to buy the Scout popcorn. As in, maybe one or two people in the neighborhood in any given year. This wasn't a case of them automatically buying the cheapest option to support Scouts. This was a case of actually offering something of value that people were interested in, or at least willing to buy. Planning a trip on Amtrak within the next year? Going to buy a case of organic flour at Bob's Red Mill? Get your money back by using just this one coupon! I agree that popcorn sales are really a "thank you for your donation" more than a product sale. And if you don't live in a place where people are really wanting to make donations to BSA, it doesn't go over real well. I'm so glad the Council we are in now doesn't bother with it.
  12. Author Dr. Henry Hamrick’s relationship with Bud Schiele was established in the late 1950s and 60s at the Piedmont Boy Scout Camp on Lake Lanier near Tryon. Schiele was the chief scout executive for the Piedmont Council and directed the camp during those years. Hamrick made his first trip to Lake Lanier when he was 9 years old, and after spending a few summers there as a camper, he returned for several more as a counselor. It added up to eight consecutive years of his life that he would never forget, as he helped scouts earn merit badges by teaching skills such as swimming, lifesaving and woodworking. Schiele, a native of Philadelphia, was a self-styled naturalist and botanist who amassed an impressive collection of wildlife, rocks and minerals in the decades after he moved to Gastonia in 1924. He was 67 years old in 1961 when he used that trove to found the Gaston County Museum of Natural History, which was renamed in his honor four years later. Its opening was a culmination of a lifetime devoted to studying, cataloging and preserving nature. “A lot of my book focuses on how he came to Gastonia, how he got started, the odds he faced, and how he recruited a lot of leaders in churches and businesses to support scouting,” said Hamrick. Dr. Henry Hamrick’s book also delves into the important role that Lily Hobbs Schiele had in supporting and enhancing her husband’s endeavors, particularly with respect to honoring Native American cultures. “I think people will find that Mr. Schiele was a true leader, an organizer, and a man of great principal, and that he truly believed the Boy Scout movement was something that would help the youth of the country to become better adults,” said Hamrick. “And Mrs. Schiele was right there and on board with all of that.” “Boy Scouting in the North Carolina Foothills, 1909-1958” spans 140 pages and should be available later this month or in November. It is being distributed by Itasca Books, and interested readers can obtain a copy by calling the company at 1-800-901-3480. More at source: https://www.gastongazette.com/news/20191013/new-book-pays-tribute-to-bud-schiele-legacy-of-scouting
  13. elitts

    Country Meats

    Let me re-write that for you more accurately. Our Pack of 38 Cubs will sell $65k in popcorn solicit $65,000 in donations. My son is on pace to sell $8k in popcorn collect $8,000 in donations, and will barely crack top 10 in our council of 60,000 scouts. Do people reach those levels selling meat sticks? _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ The core of the problem people have with popcorn is that calling it a "product sale" is so disingenuous it's practically lying. The popcorn is SO overpriced that it's no longer a product sale, it's merely a conversation opening for scouts to solicit a donation. In fact, if a troop approached most councils with a different yet equivalently priced product, it wouldn't meet the requirements for an appropriate fundraiser.
  14. Liz

    Advice for a new CC

    I love your website! Is this a template that's available for purchase or did someone donate their time and talents to create it just for your Troop? We are looking at getting our website up and running shortly and man, if we don't have to re-invent the wheel, it would make me happy!
  15. I’m the CC of a brand-new Scouts BSA troop starting up. The SM and ASM are new to their roles, as am I. We have a founding group of about 5-6 Scouts to start, but as we’re the only girls’ troop serving a three-county district, we have the potential for very rapid growth over the next 2-3 years. —> What advice would you give to the SM to start off on the right foot and emphasize the patrol method? —> What can the troop committee do to support and encourage the patrol method? —> What practices can we put in place from the start that will help guide us to keep the patrol method at the forefront as we grow? Thanks!
  16. Calion

    How to start a new unit

    I'm aware that this is an ooooold post, but it's still useful. In that vein, I found the "Membership Committee Guide" (33080) online.
  17. ParkMan

    Limit for Cub Scout nights of camping

    Thanks @RichardB I think many are on edge these days. As I'm sure you know, there is a lot of concern about erosion of program. I'm reaidng between the lines here and am guessing we overreacted to the term "overnighter". If "overnighter" refers to the of sleeping overnight and doesn't mean that it's single overnight - great. Personally - I don't think we need more definition, I'd just remove the term overnighter. Camping implies sleeping overnight in the woods. "overnighter" suggests one night. I'd offer the terms that make the most sense to volunteers are: .den camping pack camping council organized camping Now that I read this again, I realize that there is an effort to overnghter to distinguish from day camps. I don't think it's needed. If one said "pack camping", I think we all understand that implies spending the night.
  18. RichardB

    Limit for Cub Scout nights of camping

    @Eagle94-A1 was no change in policy. More effective communication would be my analysis. Et al, do you really want to have a definition of overnight in Pack Overnighters? Asking for a friend. Just saying, on one hand, this thread says national changes the rules, on the other a call for more definition. Which is it? RichardB
  19. WisconsinMomma

    Limit for Cub Scout nights of camping

    I just came home from a two night Pack overnighter at the council camp. We were in cabins. Council will tell us if this is not approved, but since we are at a council camp, I am sure that these things are A-OK. We want our council camp facilities to be used for Scouts, they are set up very well for Cubs and the kids have a great time.
  20. ParkMan

    Limit for Cub Scout nights of camping

    This is a big deal because it directly contributes to weaker Cub Scout programming. I served in a pack where 80% of our camping trips were two nights. Occasionally we'd have a one nighter for some reason or another, but it was rare. The reason to have a two night camping trip is that it allows for a single, full day at camp. A Cub Scout wakes up at the camp, get's ready at the camp, has breakfast at the camp, does a day of activities, and so on. When you turn that into a single overnighter, then it decreases the time available for the Scout to grow more comfortable in the outdoors. This is why council cuborees do just this. In my experience, an active Cub Scout program is a great way to prepare Scouts, parents, and potential leaders for an active Scouts BSA program. We had numerous parents who had never camped join us when their sons were Tigers. We'd find them a tent, they'd scare up some sleeping bags, and away we'd go. In the process, the parents also learned a lot about camping. So, by the time their son got to Scouts BSA they'd be very comfortable outdoors. It also challenged us as a pack to know how to prepare for a big trip. We'd had gear, plenty of cooking equipment, we knew how to run an all day program. We've been around for enough years that this was built up over time. So, when that two night camping trip came up in the fall, you can rest assured that it was very well planned and executed. In fact our Cub leaders often go on to be BALOO trainers themselves because they learn how to run a well oiled Cub Scout camping trip. Maybe the BSA is really worried about Cub Scout packs who don't know how to run a two night trip. If so, then apply the correct remedy. Have "BALOO 2" or have some kind of district camper certify the unit. It's not really a hard problem to solve here. Frankly - the BSA needs to stop responding to all of this stuff by dumbing down the program. Isn't that the lesson of the Improved Scouting Program of the 70s?
  21. While true (at least in terms of REPORTED sex offenders), why does this not mean that we need to have male and female leaders on ALL outings, regardless of the gender of the youth involved? All or nearly all of the lawsuits against the BSA for previous failures to protect youth from sexual predators is from abuse against male youth. Why do they deserve less protection than female youth? Is there any particular evidence that girls are in more danger than boys from sexual predators? We do know male victims report less often than females, but not necessarily that they are victimized less.
  22. WisconsinMomma

    Advice for a new CC

    Recognize, praise and thank your volunteers often. Try not to defuse any drama and get people working together as much as possible. And have fun.
  23. WisconsinMomma

    BSA amends female adult required with female youth

    Most sex offenders are male. There are female sex offenders too, but the majority of abusers are men. Scouting needs leaders, male and female. Two-deep leadership and Youth Protection are VERY important, and parents should have full visibility into the program any time / every time they want it. It takes a village to keep kids safe.
  24. qwazse

    Pack dilemma

    Some of our troops parents hung back as Pack committee members, so don't take that option of the table if it's weighing on you. This over-assertive leader is not CC material. She needs a mentor who can gently but firmly guide her in improved communication skills. But, your bottom line is you have a CO who doesn't realize how much the pack represents them. If they did, they would lean on an employee who they trust to be a little more assertive in the "hiring and firing" of volunteers. This is probably partly your doing because you had to scramble to find a roof. No matter. Every effort the CC makes to build a better relationship with the COR will have its return in terms of getting adults to work better together.
  25. Sentinel947

    BSA amends female adult required with female youth

    It doesn't really break mine. Any time there's a man among youth (male of female), there are going to be parents that are rightfully defensive about it. Those of you who have rubbed shoulders with foreign Scout groups have seen that young adults in their 20's-30's make up a big chunk of Scout leaders. Here in the States, a combination of moving away from home for college, lack of paid time off at the beginning of careers, and "all adult men around kids must be potential pedophiles" keeps Scouting in the US from tapping into a knowledgeable and needed group of volunteers. I'm not sure what the answer is for that. Statistically men are more dangerous than women. However, statistically many child abusers are family or related to the victim. Given my demographic and situation, I do my best to educate others and enforce YPT. Not only does it protect our youth, but it's critical to protect my reputation as well. If other people have innocent lapses with YPT, they will likely be given a pass. I cannot and will not count on that. What does break my heart: We had our council camporee last weekend. I took some of the Catholic Scouts to Mass at the camporee. On the way back to our campsite one of them asked which parish church I attend. All 4 of the youth and I attend the same parish church. Our former pastor was recently suspended by the diocese for breaking the Catholic Church's version of YPT. After that news broke he was accused and charged with abuse of a minor in the 1990's before he became a Priest. Thankfully they didn't ask too many questions, (I hope they had those conversations with their parents.) Parents are right to be defensive and protective of their kids. The last few decades have proved you can't really fully trust anybody with your kids; not your Scout leaders, not the Priest, not their teachers, not their coaches and not even your own family. Parents can't remove all the adults from their kids lives, but they do need to remain vigilant. So I'm not mad at parents for having that attitude. I'm not mad that parents view people like me with suspicion. I'm not going to swim uphill against the prevailing attitudes and suspicions of the culture.
  26. WisconsinMomma

    Pack dilemma

    This is tough. I left a cub leadership role last year because a newer leader was a perfectionist who did not appreciate that others are volunteering and who make mistakes. I retired and chose to let a younger group lead and now it is in their hands. Like you my youngest is going to Boy Scouts. If i had to do it again I would have had.l a private conversation with her about realistic expectations for a volunteer group with various personalities. I was worn out and decided to go. In our case, I had just given a lot of work for a camp weekend and then felt reamed out in front of the committtee by the new person because the next pack meeting started late. But no one was communicating that time concern on that day. It was too much. I had five years in leadership and I was not going to take harsh criticism after working so hard. People need to understand that Scouting takes the cooperation of many to make it work.
  27. I have two daughters and a son. I am very protective of all of them. I think this is where YPT in the BSA can serve another beneficial purpose. In the GSUSA, the rules about male involvement have all but removed fathers from the equation. My two daughters are Girl Scouts and I have never been welcomed in their Scouting experience. It so saddens me that even my wonderful, progressive wife who is a Girl Scout leader has so totally embraced the concept that Girl Scouting is about women guiding girls through Scouting. Yet, my son's Cub Scout Pack & Scouts BSA Troop for boys have an adult leadership team that is about 40% female. It has created a wonderful environment where countless mothers, fathers, and their sons can enjoy Scouting together. It's been such a wonderfully welcoming environment that we've often had female siblings tag along. So, because of how inclusive the BSA has been, I totally get why we now have girls in the program. I also understand why the GSUSA never will have boys in their program. Now that we have introduced female Scouts, the BSA has a wonderful opportunity to provide the same welcoming environment for female youth. I will admit that I do not know numbers - but I have to imagine that a group of adult males will be just as trustworthy taking a group of girls camping as they would with female adults present. Whether it's groups of boys or girls, most Scouting units are composed of parents. Yes, at the Scouts BSA level, there are more volunteers who are either young adults or adults who's parents have aged out. But, for the most part it's parents like me who want to Scout with their children. I would love to have the opportunity to Scout with my 10 year old daughter. So, when I saw the BSA rules that required female leaders, I was very disappointed. Because I've been a Cub Scout leader, I know that the Cub program is very family involved. You absolutely have lots of both mothers & fathers present. In Scouts BSA it will be the same thing. Just as we have 40% female adults in the troop leadership team today, so too would I expect that we'll have 40% males in a troop for girls without any new BSA rules So, I see these rules a something of the BSA falling into the same trap as the GSUSA. That men are dangerous and we need women there to keep girls safe. This is an unfortunate social construct that we keep teaching generation after generation. Here the BSA can leverage all the YPT training, backgrounds checks, COR oversight, and benefit of troops with established track records to let girls and their parents know that they will be just fine with adult men taking girls camping. I feel for you @Sentinel947. Breaks my heart too to see your post. For my part, I accept the YPT rules and do embrace them to the fullest. But, I really do wish the BSA would sit down with some experts and rethink this message that they are sending to girls, mothers, and their fathers.
  28. That's just heartbreaking to me. I understand where you're coming from entirely. But IMO, we need to practice two-deep leadership and other YPT rules like the law, because that will stop the few rotten apples from doing damage, and from there practice "A Scout is Trustworthy." Yes, I'd allow my daughter to attend events without female leaders present, as long as I had faith that YPT was consistently followed in the unit. I don't worry about unit leaders preying on my daughter partly because I know they are never ever alone with her.
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    • The results of the Troop coffee fundraiser are in, and we netted $7,600 to surpass our goal of $4,000.  We probably have another $500 to come in from some stragglers.  On top of this we received $6,000 from some institutional sources, so we have what we need to greatly subsidize the costs of our under-resourced families and their girls in our 30-Scout Troop.  We will use some for some equipment purchases and make a Friends of Scouting contribution to our local council (something like $1,500).  The rest we will save to begin building our long-term fund for stability.  Thanks to everyone for the many good suggestions.  We used every one of them. Note to Liz:  There is no girl-specific Web Site template out there at this point.  We wrote ours from scratch after we figured out how we would operate.  Then we did our best to determine what an 11-13 year old girl and her parents would want to know about that implementation and wrote to that specific interest in our very-urban environment.  We talk directly to that girl except for my “Scoutmaster’s Letter” to the parents — but even that is very specific to our urban all-girl implementation.  I will say the writing of the site turned out to be the way we ended up understanding our challenges and deciding how the Troop would launch and operate.  The site has been a huge hit.  Our new parents love it because it is beginner-friendly and explains the basics without using any Scouting lingo or abbreviations.  While not relevant to our use of our site, it is interesting to note that it has been viewed by 2.2K discrete visitors since going active on October 1, 2018, including viewers from 40 countries.  Maybe this is just a typical result for troop web sites — I just don’t know.
    • In my experience there are several factors as to why young adults do not stick around. College is indeed a big one. One issue I faced when I was under 25 was that other adults refused to view me as a fellow adult with the same knowledge, abilities, and skills that they had. As a 21 year old OA chapter advisor, that was a big issue with others on the district committee I sat with. I was either told I don't know what i'm talking about, or ignored all together. I had to use my allies on the committees to get my ideas across fro the benefit of the Scouts. Worse case was the SM who wanted me to alter the troop's OA election results. He actually followed me into the parking lot, cursing me out and saying I had no idea what I was doing in the OA.  But the #1 factor I see now affects the 18-20 year olds, and we need to keep them active. The problem is thatr National no longer counts them as adults in regards to YP guidelines. I remember the stink that happened when National tried to implement the policy immediately, and troops started complaining to the councils and HA bases because they would have to cancel trips because they were relying on the 18-20 y.o. ASMs as the 2nd adult. If the young adults do not believe National trusts them as adults, why should they stick around?
    • Read Green Bar Bill Hillcourt's books.  That will help
    • There are older brothers of our scouts, with great skills that they learned in scouting, that I would like to tap to help with our Scouts BSA girls -- were they not away from home attending college.   There are also older cousins, male and female, in their twenties,  with Eagle Scout and Venturing backgrounds,  that I would love to tap to help out -- except that they live out of state.  We live in a town which people leave at age 18.   And to which people move at around age thirtyish,  already married,  and either with preschool children, or thinking about soon having children. 
    • The www.ScoutsBsaDcGirls.org website is great! Our troop ended up going with using the services provided by bsahosting.org    Our committee member who was looking into this liked that the website came with email lists for the troop with a reasonable privacy policy that did not involve selling our data.    They have a template troop website that a troop can customize.
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