Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Suggestions for a knot tying, lashing (or other scoutcraft) activity for girl scouts

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Suggestions for a knot tying, lashing (or other scoutcraft) activity for girl scouts

    There's an event coming up where some of the troop have volunteered to teach some girl scouts--primarily younger, most will be younger than 12, as young as first grade--some basic skills including knot tying and/or lashings. Haven't decided on one or the other.

    It's time-limited, probably 30 minute segments. We don't want to do a pioneering tower or something large; we're thinking small and something that could be started and finished by each group. Ideally we could come up with a small craft of some sort that the girls could take home with them. I've been wracking my brain a bit with the boys trying to figure out something that is a bit more interesting than just rote-learning a few different knots.

    Any ideas? They did survival bracelets last year, just FYI.

  • #2
    How about a knot tying game? Have a brief orientation/instruction to a few (6) basic knots, then let them play the game.

    Comment


    • #3
      If you are looking for something craft related, how about macrame? Square, larks head, and half hitch, knots are the basic knots used in macrame.

      Keep in mind that 6-12 years is a big difference in ages. The kids will all have different attention spans, and dexterity. I would use very basic patterns for the youngest, and get a bit more complicated for the older ones. Also keep in mind how experienced at knot tying the girls are. You might want to have some patterns/materials on hand for the few girls that are more experienced.

      Take a look at this site -

      http://www.free-macrame-patterns.com...-patterns.html

      http://www.free-macrame-patterns.com...-for-kids.html

      Comment


      • ScoutNut
        ScoutNut commented
        Editing a comment
        While my son loved pioneering, he also just loved to knot, and splice, and whatever he could do with two pieces of rope. He liked the creation process, but knot tying to him was something soothing he could do to relax, yet keep his hands, and mind, busy. For an active guy with ADHD that was a great find.

        My girls made woven/knotted hair scrunchies on one of their campouts. I believe this was for one of their badges, and all that was required was to make one to fulfill the requirement. These girls made these things all night long. They made them while sitting around the campfire. They made them while laying and chatting in their tents. They each went home with 5-8 of the things!

        They did the same thing with God's Eye's on another campout.

        Pioneering is fine, but why make a plain old tripod when you can make a hammock chair! Or a necklace, bracelet, key chain, belt, vase, hat, dog leash, guitar strap, plant hanger, bag (throw in a bit of regular pioneering and lash sticks together for the handle) bookmark, table, and more.

        Since when is tying knots in rope not "Scouty enough"?
        Last edited by ScoutNut; 08-27-2013, 02:09 AM.

      • dcsimmons
        dcsimmons commented
        Editing a comment
        It's funny how times change. The ABK says that macramé (square knotting) was developed by sailors in the Navy to keep their hands busy during their downtime. Back in the day of wooden ships and iron men. .

      • Brewmeister
        Brewmeister commented
        Editing a comment
        It's not an issue of girls versus boys, it's a matter of A) limited time (15-30 minute slots) and B) the fact that all kids (girls and boys) like bling to take home from camp. Hence the small/crafty objective.

        Yeah, it will be a big age difference, but such is the nature of a service unit camp.

    • #4
      Tripods, plain and simple, maybe add a bookshelf.

      Comment


      • #5
        check out the knot tying requirements for tiger, wolf, bear, and webelos level. Note, I don't think there is one for tiger (6 year olds), most struggle to tie their shoes. Wolves learn to tie their shoes, tie a package, tie a stopper knot. Bears move on to a few real knots. webelos with a bit of a purpose for the knot.

        I'd say there is a still a big interest in the survival bracelets. in "girly" colors they might be appropriate and with enough help any age can do the basic pattern.

        Comment


        • #6
          Make a stretcher with ropes and a poles or just rope. Plus it is only one knot. Clove Hitch


          http://www.hitt-initiative.org/mla/?page_id=719
          Last edited by st0ut717; 08-27-2013, 05:17 AM.

          Comment


          • #7
            If you are familiar with Girl Scout Swaps, (Special Whatchamacallits Affectionately Pinned Somewhere) they are like their equivalent of custom neckerchief slides or something, and they can make them to trade. There are some with various knots incorporated into the making of them, some called Friendship Knots, etc.

            Some googling Girl Scout SWAPS and Knots showed quite a few results. Unfortunately, a lot are on pinterest, which is blocked here at work.

            Comment


            • #8
              Taught the square knot and two half hitches. Finished with a group activity of tying the instructor to a chair. The young ones enjoyed that.

              Comment


              • 5yearscouter
                5yearscouter commented
                Editing a comment
                Joe Bob,
                that is what my den chief usually does with the new scouts that show up to the first mandatory cub scout parent meeting. teaches them knots, lets them tie him to a chair and then they roll him up and down the hallway of the school.

            • #9
              In case anyone was wondering how this turned out, we decided to just do basic knot tying for a few minutes--square knot and half hitches. A fire-building lesson with demos of flint & steel, charcloth, and 9v battery + steel wool. Finished with orienteering basics and a compass course.

              For a takeaway they all got one of those "survival tools"--the orange whistle/matchholder/compass thingy. Worked out well and the boys were a big hit with the girls, including the older ones, which they didn't seem to mind...

              Comment

              Working...
              X