Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Eagle76

Adult Patrols

Recommended Posts

The two adult patrols have a name and a yell only, no PL or flag(other than the Troop banner that lists our Eagle Scouts and the patches the Troop has earned. They sleep and eat away from the boys unless invited to join them for a meal. They are encouraged to buy and wear the Scout uniform(At this time 90% have done so). They teach the methods of Boy Scouts to new adults and are a resourse for the boys. We dont play "the game". Adult patrols simply help keep the adults organized. In a side note it also serves to impress on the adults to be proud od the uniform( I dont know how many times Ive seen an adult cover up their uniform before entering a store)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think every Troop should have an adult patrol. It's too bad our SM believes that this wouldn't work because he doesn't think the boys would be able to function without us adults in the mix. :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think it's best to have adults camp as a patrol. Buy food as a patrol, use a duty roster in camp if you'd like. No patch, no POR's.

 

Gonzo1

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Suppose a patrol wishes to have the SM come over and have supper with them because they're trying out a new recipe? Sorry, he can't he's on the roster for the adult patrol and he's cooking over there.

 

Supposed a patrol wishes to have an ASM come over and have supper with them because they're trying out his new recipe? Nope, can't do that either.

 

Suppose a patrol wishes to have the chaperone parents of their members come over and have.... Nope! This is patrol-method boy led and no adult is allowed to "interfere". Hmmmm, but "Suppose a patrol wishes..." Nope.

 

I have gone one plenty of outings where the adults mess up as needed or cooked individually. I do not have the boys make the SM's coffee under any circumstances, and I have demonstrated a new recipe on occasion when a patrol has asked for such assistance. Patrols operate independently, but they don't need to ask permission to have adults involved.

 

Does this mean that when at summer camp with the mess hall there are no adult patrols?

 

Stosh

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stosh,

Let fine tune my response a bit, I've been away for a little while and I've forgotten how some replies aren't taken the way they are meant.

 

OK, I suggest that adults camp as a patrol. If it's the troop custom to have scouts buy and cook for adults, that's fine, but I don't think, in fact I oppose adults sleeping in the same area as scouts. This reply is intended for BS programs, not cubs, that's totally different. I know the rule says that a boy can sleep in the same tent with his parent, I just don't agree with it. I know someone will respond with the austistic kid scenario, the ADHD kis scenario, etc. All other things being equal, cut the cord, let junior tent with his buddies.

 

I've seen adults have a small group do the patrol thing while some other dads hide, watch TV, have their own food, sleep in an old RV, yada, yada, yada.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You are absolutely correct, I was only pointing out some of the problems with so many exceptions to the rule that the rule doesn't make much sense.

 

The number of adults should be kept to a minimum, parents tagging along to be with their boy(s)isn't necessary in a boy-led patrol method troop. Maybe one adult eating with each patrol should be sufficient. Those adults should "rotate" among the patrols so the SM can visit with each patrol over the course of an outing. Adults should of course tent off by themselves, but close enough for assisting any troop or PL's requesting assistance. If operating well, a boy-led patrol method troop doesn't need enough adults to have an adult patrol. The adults who are extras, usually find themselves with idle hands and a tendency to mess with the operation of the patrols. If they wish to come along, sit in a chair, drink coffee and observe the patrols do their own thing. Fine. If not, stay home.

 

Stosh

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All scouting is global but think local!

 

Every troop is going to have their own way to do things! Every troop will vary in Size, Age status, experience, and available leadership. There is no Cookie cutter producing troops and hence there are no cookie cutter solutions to the issues.

 

If we spent more time opening our minds and recognizing that people have varrying oppinions and varrying ways of doing things, all of which may or may not be successful, then new people walking in here might be able to take an idea back to their troop so they don't have to call a parent on thursday night and beg them to camp on Friday.

 

Maybe if your program is struggling to get adults you can benefit from some of the ways others do it. Maybe if you are flourishing you want to share what your secret is. Maybe if you have issues with too many parents getting in the way, a Patrol system might be needed. What ever the status some of you really need to step back and be less preachy less decidely dominating in your position and less of a dictatorship.

 

All scouting grows at its own pace and things grow and succeed as you allow it. plant the seed, sun it, water it and reap the rewards. Over water it or block out the sun or be too cold and it will die.

 

We have the caveman patrol and they operate as my logistics squad. They provide me the ability to operate the troop and be tied to worrying about when i or what i will eat. If I am invited to a patrol to eat with them i do. No matter how bad or how great it is. If I am not invited I eat with the adults. If I want to share some of camp cookery i usually do it as program agenda or as a troop wide feast where we all share our meals.

 

Scouting is supposed to be fun! Scouts are supposed to be kind and friendly, Some of you may need to refresh your memeory on the law and oath, THat isn't just for the Boys!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

T164SM,

I've stopped visiting this page for the exact reasons you mentioned. I go to church on Sunday to receive my preaching, and my pastor is a lot more friendly. It stopped being fun, so I stopped coming here.

 

As you mentioned, there are a lot of ways to run a Troop, some clearly described by the BSA, others aren't. For the sake of those visiting this page, I wish those who stray from the BSA methods amd model would just admit it.

 

I'll start with Adult Patrols. The BSA is mum on the subject - they don't mention it in any of their training or program materials, AFAIK. They aren't prohibited, and they aren't described. There isn't any outline for how to run them. We use it because I need a team to help supervise the troop - a team, not a loose group of parents. The Adult Patrol is the mechanism that allows us to build that team, to build camaraderie, to build consensus, to teach new parents the Patrol Method. The parents are the same as the boys - if they aren't having fun, they aren't going to come help out.

 

Hopefully someone new to Scouting can read this and understand it is not part of the official program, that it isn't required, but it also isn't prohibited, and they can see the reasons why we use it. If the Adult Patrol was prohibited, or we were running it in a way contrary to BSA outlines, I should acknowledge that. Compare this to some who say Patrols can go on their own campouts without getting SM approval. The BSA is clear on this (page 22, SM HB). If a poster's troop doesn't follow this procedure, the poster should mention that, so those who are new here will see they are going outside the program. A simple disclaimer would be "This is not how the BSA teaches to handle this, but we don't require Patrols to get SM approval for their own hikes or campouts. We feel it takes away responsibility from the PL's." Simple enough, I would think.

Good luck, T164SM. Back to my more pressing duties.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am glad our Troop is not huge. 40+ boys on a once-a-month camping experience plus loads of adults does not seem like a front country - much less back country - rugged experience for my boys.

 

I don't know how the boys are supposed to have the physical separation (Kudu!) into separate patrols and away from adults with that many campers. Each campout would seem more akin to a mini camporee.

 

But I readily admit the key here is - I'm not used to working with a large troop. I would have lots more to learn in such a troop.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As far as adult patrols - my Wood Badge patrol members are like family to me.

 

If we had adults want to form a patrol - OK, good team-bulding, so long as it supports the goal of promoting our boy-run troop.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I suppose one way to show how patrol method works is to apply it.

 

That is, have the adults elect a PL who "runs" the patrol, and APL in his absence. The PL could put together the duty roster, the patrol could make it's own flag too. They could even have their own yell and call- - - presumably the moans and grown of their aching joints or some such thing ;).

 

If one parent is always cooking, the others don't get to help, etc, just like the boys.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know this is from a year ago, but I just came across Stosh's statement and really read it the wrong way:

 

"I have gone one plenty of outings where the adults mess up as needed ..."

 

At first (and second and third) glance, I thought you were proposing that the adults screw things up so the Scouts can correct them. Come to think of it, that might be an interesting teaching technique - kind of like a "worst aid" demonstration.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Certainly still on the "Adult Patrols" topic, but aside from what is currently being discussed. Our adults who camp (usually 3-4 in a very small troop) do function like a patrol. No name, no flag, no yell. But we work to set the example by which the scouts and patrols can follow. But something new happened Sunday morning on this past weekend's campout, which has not happened in any of our scouter's memory.

 

We are methodical in our meals. We cook, we clean (3-pan, by the book) and we are done. We always cook a hot breakfast, as do the patrols. If reveille is at 7:00, we are almost always done eating and cleaned up by 8:00 most mornings. But yesterday, one patrol made breakfast and was done before we sat down to eat!

 

This is is, in fact,the best thing I can imagine happening! And to make it even better, it was our new scout patrol, 4 out of 5 of whom were first time troop campers!. They cooked bacon and eggs and made breakfast boritos (fruit on the side). We have had patrols who are cooking and cleaning until after 10:00am on more than one occasion, just because not enough of them could stay on task long enough to finish a single job. Now if only we can find a way to inspire that other patrol to better themselves....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't worry Buffalo, the boys will figure it out on their own. Once one patrol gets in the groove and has all their chores done and they have a chance to goof off, the others will follow suit. I have often fielded the question why the SM is sitting around doing nothing and when I point to the fact that all my camp chores are done, they take that info under advisement. I'm usually the first with my tent up, first done with meals and first in line for any fun activities. Once the race rules are figured out, they are more than happy to get with the program.

 

Stosh

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×