Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
69RoadRunner

Not Quite Prepared for Philmont

Recommended Posts

Mmmm, need more opinions, but the thin plastic Gatorade bottles wear out quickly with rough treatment of backpacking. Maybe others here had a better experience. 

Pack covers are as important for protecting the packs at night as they are during the day because there isn’t enough room for them in the tents.  It can rain almost every night. Nothing like packing a soggy pack. If you don’t want to purchase a pack cover. Consider heavy duty trash bags. 

One thing we didn’t consider on our shake downs was the size and weight of food. You’re packing for almost a week. ITS A LOT. So remember you may not be packing as neatly as you planned. We packed the tent torward the last because we could stuff it the what few spaces we had left. We packed lunch, and rain gear last so we didnt have to unpack everything getting to the bottom. 

Barry

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
38 minutes ago, Eagledad said:

Mmmm, need more opinions, but the thin plastic Gatorade bottles wear out quickly with rough treatment of backpacking. Maybe others here had a better experience. 

They have worked for me and my hoodlums.  I use them for a year of so, then get new ones. No problems yet. Even talked some folks into using a 16-20 once bottle for mixing powdered drinks and keeping it in a cargo pocket so you are not constantly asking someone to get it out of a pack pocket you cannot reach.

 

I made a pack cover out of a contractor garbage bag, and I carry a spare to  completely  cover and tie up my pack at nite. I do not like wet foam against my back.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Philmont rangers like to hang the bear bag first thing after finding camp ( I was taught set up shelter first). Teach everyone to put all their smellables in one bag so they can empty their pack and grab their bag and throw it in the bear bag. And anything else that smells like a shirt with spilled food on it.

Barry

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been using the same aluminum canteen for 45 years, just sayin'. The only downside is I haven't resided at the address that I engraved on it for some 30 years. If I lose the thing, I might have to take a drive there, introduce myself, and have them keep a lookout and find it a good home.

The clear bottle for drink mix is a good idea too.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Eagledad said:

One thing we didn’t consider on our shake downs was the size and weight of food. You’re packing for almost a week. ITS A LOT. So remember you may not be packing as neatly as you planned. We packed the tent torward the last because we could stuff it the what few spaces we had left. We packed lunch, and rain gear last so we didnt have to unpack everything getting to the bottom. 

Barry

I told our scouts to pack all of their personal gear in their backpack.  Then make sure they had enough space leftover to fit their home bed pillow in the pack.  This would ensure there was enough space for food and crew gear.  One scout arrived at gear shakedown with a pack that looked completely full.  I was worried.  He had arrived with the pillow in his pack to prove he had enough space.

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, qwazse said:

I've been using the same aluminum canteen for 45 years, just sayin'. The only downside is I haven't resided at the address that I engraved on it for some 30 years. If I lose the thing, I might have to take a drive there, introduce myself, and have them keep a lookout and find it a good home.

The clear bottle for drink mix is a good idea too.

I'm trying to teach them to use some of the lightweight techniques that modern backpackers are using in their through hikes of the Appalachian Trail and other trails.  If backpacking becomes something they want to do after scouts, I want them to know they can go light and enjoy backpacking more.  Using Smartwater or other "disposable" bottles is very common among lightweight backpackers.  They are surprisingly durable and light.

I was told one of our previous scoutmasters took our troop to Philmont and hit the trail with a pack that weighed over 70 pounds.  I can only assume he carried a dutch oven.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ive used smart water bottles and gatorade bottles on 2 PSR treks and a few other non-PSR treks.  I like the smart water because they are tall and skinny so fit better in my side pockets.  I usually get multiple 32oz and 1 of the 16oz with the "sport bottle" lid.  I drink the 16 at home and put the lid on the 32.  Be sure to put names on them because they all look alike.

I havnt used a pack cover in many years.  Instead I use a pack liner and just deal with the pack itself being wet.  Any heavy duty trash bag will work as a liner, I like the ones we get from the DOT for highway cleanup because they are orange so easier to see into than the usual black bags.  They are a good diameter for my pack and tall enough to roll the top down.

One problem we often have with pack covers - when someone straps their foam pad to the outside of the pack, they always strap it horizontally which causes the cover to "flair" out leaving a gap on the sides.  Putting the pad inside the pack is better, but if they need to put it outside, I have them strap it vertically so the cover fits better.

To put the pad inside - try putting it into the empty pack vertically then unroll the pad as much as possible to create a "tube" and put everything else down inside the tube.

 

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, jjlash said:

I havnt used a pack cover in many years.  Instead I use a pack liner and just deal with the pack itself being wet.  Any heavy duty trash bag will work as a liner, I like the ones we get from the DOT for highway cleanup because they are orange so easier to see into than the usual black bags.  They are a good diameter for my pack and tall enough to roll the top down.

One problem we often have with pack covers - when someone straps their foam pad to the outside of the pack, they always strap it horizontally which causes the cover to "flair" out leaving a gap on the sides.  Putting the pad inside the pack is better, but if they need to put it outside, I have them strap it vertically so the cover fits better.

To put the pad inside - try putting it into the empty pack vertically then unroll the pad as much as possible to create a "tube" and put everything else down inside the tube.

 

I bought 2 packs of trash compactor bags and handed them out to the crew to use as liners.  I have a nylofume bag for myself.

Good advice on the pads.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/23/2019 at 9:25 AM, 69RoadRunner said:

As long as my plantar fasciitis stays away as well as the IT band issue that popped up 2 years ago during my son's hiking merit badge hikes, I'll be OK.  I've done a lot of leg work, and the IT band has been doing well.  It only came up during steep downhill sections.

 

If it starts to flare up again, consider getting a Strassburg Sock to take with you.  It's a lightweight version of a "night splint".  Keeping the achilles tendon stretched out during the night makes a huge difference for me on whether or not I have pain during the day.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Putting a little spin on this thread. My daughter arrived at the PTC today to start her summer job at the Craft Center. She thought she had everything she needed before arriving, but NO!! She's been there 12 hrs and I have a 'please send me list'. Namely she needs a folding step stool - she and her tentmate are too short to reach the light switch on the light in their tent. Go figure 5'6" is too short to reach the switch.

To everyone going to Philmont this summer, either the Training Center or Trekking, know that your staff has/is arriving and working hard to make your trip one to remember. The PTC staff schedule for staff week is pretty hectic and the CHQ staff has been busting butt for a couple of days now. 23 staff arrived with her on her bus from Raton this morning. Enjoy your time at Philmont. Go to the craft center and say Hi to my kid.

I wish I could go back, maybe someday.

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Three and a half weeks till I arrive.  Spending one night at PTC before heading to Rayado Ridge for two weeks.  I'll try to stop in to craft center and say hi.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/26/2019 at 8:24 PM, elitts said:

If it starts to flare up again, consider getting a Strassburg Sock to take with you.  It's a lightweight version of a "night splint".  Keeping the achilles tendon stretched out during the night makes a huge difference for me on whether or not I have pain during the day.

I bought this one.  Thanks!!

https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B00IBGJKW4/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/29/2019 at 10:57 AM, 69RoadRunner said:

If you've never tried one before, be warned.  It's tough to sleep with them on the whole night at first.  It took me a good 2 weeks before I could tolerate having it on for more than 2-3 hours, and even now, about 1/3rd the time I wake up after 5-6 hours and have to release it.  But even with that, it's great.  It was SO nice to be able to wake up and walk without a limp for the first minute or two every morning.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, elitts said:

If you've never tried one before, be warned.  It's tough to sleep with them on the whole night at first.  It took me a good 2 weeks before I could tolerate having it on for more than 2-3 hours, and even now, about 1/3rd the time I wake up after 5-6 hours and have to release it.  But even with that, it's great.  It was SO nice to be able to wake up and walk without a limp for the first minute or two every morning.

I had PF in both feet at the same time. I had a boot that I wore every night, alternating feet each night.  I managed to sleep with it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×