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Scouts BSA's welcoming of girls has brought me back into the fold after 24 years out.  This eagle scout was required to have a fire bucket on each side of a tent in addition to the stenciled "no flames in tents!" on the rain fly.  Should we buy / obtain from recycling small 1/2 gallon buckets for this purpose and make the stencils? Or is this not done any longer?

Do people still do this?  I see no mention of this in the handbook.

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My council camp used to require this during summer camp around that same time. We all though it rather amusing given that we were already under a No Fires Whatsoever restriction every year due to the forest being so dry.

I've never seen the requirement anywhere else. It's not required now.

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Camp tents usually have the stencils on the tents.  And we are required to have the Fire Guard System in place in camp.  That is water and sand at the two corners, and in our camp critter sticks in the water.  Also every camp has a long hose which is supposed to hooked up and coiled for immediate use if necessary.

 

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9 hours ago, skeptic said:

Camp tents usually have the stencils on the tents.  And we are required to have the Fire Guard System in place in camp.  That is water and sand at the two corners, and in our camp critter sticks in the water.  Also every camp has a long hose which is supposed to hooked up and coiled for immediate use if necessary.

 

Never heard of the fire buckets.  Our tents have a laminated sheet in each tent identifying that there are no fires in tents.  If you want buckets, try asking Firehouse Subs if you have one near you.  Their pickles come in red buckets and they sell them cheap after emptying.  Individual stores have been known to donate the buckets upon request.  Otherwise the $2 goes towards helping firemen.  https://www.firehousesubs.com/

The buckets have print on them but you could easily paint WATER or SAND over the print if you wanted.

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10 hours ago, mrjohns2 said:

 This eagle scout was required to have a fire bucket on each side of a tent in addition to the stenciled "no flames in tents!" on the rain fly. 

Not sure when that went away.  When on staff (way back in the old days, before the internet and cell phones, you know the dark ages*) we had stacks of #10 cans painted red and they would be place out in camp for dirt and water.  They were placed at each tent.

Been back at summer camps with the troop over the last 10 years and we do not seem to have that any longer.  There is the stencil for NO FLAMES IN TENTS painted on them.

We keep buckets in the troop trailer for the main campfire (or campfires) when camping.  If we have a fire at summer camp, which is rare as it's normally like 900 degrees so fire is not a great option, and have them out.

*though is was the dark ages the albums and music were the best, still enjoyed by all the Boy Scouts lo these many years later

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16 minutes ago, Jameson76 said:

Not sure when that went away.  When on staff (way back in the old days, before the internet and cell phones, you know the dark ages*) we had stacks of #10 cans painted red and they would be place out in camp for dirt and water.  They were placed at each tent.

It changed in the mid 90s around here. Reasoning given to us is that the modern tent materials are flame resistant and would burn quickly with very low flames when they do burn. Scouts are safer letting the tent burn then trying escape through the flames and throwing water and sand would actually make the situation more dangerous because the burning material would breakup and fall inside the tent. Also, the other HUGE benefit of no water buckets for our area are the mosquitoes. One or two buckets aren't a huge problem, but a camp full of water buckets for dozens of tents can be a serious health hazard. We still keep buckets around for the fire rings.

Barry

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11 hours ago, Saltface said:

My council camp used to require this during summer camp around that same time. We all though it rather amusing given that we were already under a No Fires Whatsoever restriction every year due to the forest being so dry.

I've never seen the requirement anywhere else. It's not required now.

@mrjohns2 Welcome to the forums! And, thanks in advance for all you'll do for the youth.

Returning, you will find that fire prevention has changed the way we do most things. We simply do not burn as much stuff. It's been found that large campfires actually harm trees. (It's interesting to watch over the years as campfire circles become wider because the trees around them die off - until nobody likes to set up campfire there because the grass grows too tall!) Tents are set further from fires. Depending on where you live, you may be under a complete burn ban for most or all of the year.

Add to that the newer fabrics and the odds of a tent/tarp catching fire are low. Moreover, a troop that mostly backpacks does not keep much gear in a tent. Packs have covers, and in tree filled areas many scouts/scouters set up hammocks/tarps.

Also new for many returning scouters is Leave no Trace (which used to be minimum impact camping). It encourages random placement of tents instead of the classic military postage stamp formation, or the patrol "four points" around a campfire.

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Here, from the on-line copy of Camp Standards from which all resident camps are judged each summer is the fire section.  Note: both the Fireguard Plan and No Fire In Tents wording is mentioned.  So, at least in BSA accredited camps these things should be in effect.  And some of the general info might be good for non BSA property, especially in much of the Southwest.  

 

STANDARD: Adequate provision is made for fire detection and protection. Camp properties Day camp Family camp Resident camp Trek camp Specialtyadventure camp Highadventure camp FIRE DETECTION AND PROTECTION Specific Requirements of the Standard: All subparts must be met, except as indicated. A. Campwide. A camp fire protection plan is in effect that addresses campsite, building, and area fires. Camp staff training includes specific instructions related to the staff’s roles during a fire emergency. Campers and leaders are oriented in the fireguard plan, and a campwide drill is held within 24 hours of arrival in camp. Central firefighting equipment is neatly placed and is in good condition, ready for immediate use if included in the fire plan. Examples of such equipment include hoses, back pumps, rakes, shovels, and mattocks. B. Buildings. 1. Fire extinguishers of an approved size and type commensurate with the hazard are required. Extinguishers should be mounted near a doorway or adjacent to specific hazards and at approximately shoulder level. Current inspection tags will be evident on each extinguisher and inspection will be performed by a professional trained in their maintenance in accordance with the requirements of local codes. Refer to the current edition of NFPA 10 and OSHA 1910.157 for required placement, type, and size of extinguishers. 2. All doors on buildings comply with local codes. Generally, code requires doors in buildings that serve 50 people or more to open in the direction of escape travel. 3. Operating smoke detection is required in every enclosed permanent structure where people work, gather, or sleep. The quantity and location of detectors shall be in accordance with recognized national and local codes (NFPA, local fire codes, etc.). 4. Carbon monoxide detection is required in every enclosed permanent structure where people sleep and there is a device fueled by an energy source that produces carbon monoxide. The quantity and location of detectors shall be in accordance with recognized national and local codes. C. Kitchens. Kitchens will have approved fire extinguishers commensurate with the hazard. If a fire-suppression system is used for cooking hood(s), these systems along with extinguishers will have current inspection tags evident, and inspection will be performed by a professional trained in their maintenance in accordance with the requirements of local codes. FA-703 FA-703-2 Applies to: (Revised January 1, 2015) Camp properties Day camp Family camp Resident camp Trek camp Specialtyadventure camp Highadventure camp FIRE DETECTION AND PROTECTION D. Tents. 1. All camp-provided tentage used in the camp meets or exceeds fireretardant specifications by the manufacturer (CPAI-84). 2. At resident camps, “No Flames in Tents” is marked on, or adjacent to, each camp-provided tent. Where unit- or personally-supplied tents are used, the campsite displays a prominent “No Flames in Tents” sign. E. Bulk flammable storage. Bulk containers of flammable liquids are properly located, vented, secured, and connected in accordance with the supplier’s recommendation and local codes. Fuel pumps are locked; all flammable fuels are safely stored in approved containers that are locked or located in a controlled locker area or facility. Fire extinguishers will be provided in accordance with Section B.1 above. F. Signage. “Danger—No Smoking” signs are posted at fuel storage locations where required by code or established by council policy. INTERPRETATION: The primary requirement is that the camp conduct a risk assessment for fire and carbon monoxide risks and develop an appropriate fireguard plan. The camp fire protection plan should be coordinated with the emergency plans addressed in Standard AO-805 Emergency Procedures. Where smoke detection is a problem due to hot work such as welding, local codes may provide for alternatives such as heat detection. Backpacking-type fuel bottles and consumer-use propane and LPG cylinders up to 30 pounds used for grills and lanterns are not considered to be bulk containers for purposes of this standard. VERIFICATION: • Visual inspection and check of inspection tags and signs

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