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Can a girl who gender identifies as a boy join a Scout troop now?

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55 minutes ago, shortridge said:

As has been explained elsewhere, the parent signs the membership application and this has to “sign off” on their child’s gender identity.

How does abuse come in to play? I’m really not seeing your point.

There is no biological explanation of sexual behavior different from their born gender, what if the adult feels they had no choice during their youth?

Barry

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8 minutes ago, Oldscout448 said:

What does offend me is being told  that I must be affirming, supportive ,and even encouraging  towards something that i think ( not feel) has no basis in science , and if I am not then I have some sort of phobia.   To be fair you have not done so, nor has anyone else here.  

One really important point that I think we can all agree on. The prospective Cub who stands in front of us or calls us asking to join our pack is not “something.” He is a Scout. The girl who will be running the knot race at the district Camporee after next Feb. 1 is not “not normal.” She is a Scout. They just want to hang with their friends and go on adventures like everyone else.

Regardless of how they got here, they deserve to be treated with respect and support during their journey in Scouting. That does not mean you agree with any science or disagree with your faith’s precepts or whatever the case may be. It means you’re a good human.

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9 minutes ago, shortridge said:

One really important point that I think we can all agree on. The prospective Cub who stands in front of us or calls us asking to join our pack is not “something.” He is a Scout. The girl who will be running the knot race at the district Camporee after next Feb. 1 is not “not normal.” She is a Scout. They just want to hang with their friends and go on adventures like everyone else.

Regardless of how they got here, they deserve to be treated with respect and support during their journey in Scouting. That does not mean you agree with any science or disagree with your faith’s precepts or whatever the case may be. It means you’re a good human.

Allow me to clarify something

The "something " to which I was referring was the Trans movement thing ( I dont know the PC name) , not  the scout in question.

Edited by Oldscout448
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7 minutes ago, shortridge said:

One really important point that I think we can all agree on. The prospective Cub who stands in front of us or calls us asking to join our pack is not “something.” He is a Scout. The girl who will be running the knot race at the district Camporee after next Feb. 1 is not “not normal.” She is a Scout. They just want to hang with their friends and go on adventures like everyone else.

Regardless of how they got here, they deserve to be treated with respect and support during their journey in Scouting. That does not mean you agree with any science or disagree with your faith’s precepts or whatever the case may be. It means you’re a good human.

I don't understand the grandstanding, I can't find any posts in this discussion that suggest otherwise.

Barry

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17 minutes ago, shortridge said:

 

Regardless of how they got here, they deserve to be treated with respect and support during their journey in Scouting. That does not mean you agree with any science or disagree with your faith’s precepts or whatever the case may be. It means you’re a good human.

Help me with this please,  are we saying that in order to be a good human one must set aside ones belief in science or religious precepts when ever  one dons a scout shirt?

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Different question.    hopefully an easier one.    where  will a trans ( female to male ) scout tent?   

with the girls patrol? then we are not treating her/him as a boy. 

  the boys? scary   

  alone?   ostracizing 

Edited by Oldscout448
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20 minutes ago, shortridge said:

One really important point that I think we can all agree on. The prospective Cub who stands in front of us or calls us asking to join our pack is not “something.” He is a Scout. The girl who will be running the knot race at the district Camporee after next Feb. 1 is not “not normal.” She is a Scout. They just want to hang with their friends and go on adventures like everyone else.

Regardless of how they got here, they deserve to be treated with respect and support during their journey in Scouting. That does not mean you agree with any science or disagree with your faith’s precepts or whatever the case may be. It means you’re a good human.

Except that the reason why that "girl" Scout is crushing everyone else at the log saw, clay pigeon shoot, and fireman carry race is because they are definitely not normal (as defined by science). Nor would I be comfortable with that person showering/changing/tenting with my daughters. 

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7 minutes ago, Oldscout448 said:

Different question.    hopefully an easier one.    where  will a trans ( female to male ) scout tent?   with the girls patrol? then we are not treating her/him as a boy.    the boys? scary     alone?   ostracizing 

My understanding is that each troop is to work with the scouts parent and the BSA professional staff to develop the processes that makes sense for that youth and the other Scouts.

It could include sharing tents if everyone felt it was appropriate.

I saw a doc from one of the councils with details - but cannot seem to find it now.

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When I read the originating post; I thought the OP was asking how to handle a prospective member who is obviously a girl, but selected a blatantly false position as male in order to game the system.  

What I would do in the case of a tomboy wanting to be a scout is "Welcome to the troop.  But we're going to have an issue with who shares a tent with you, so please recruit another 'boy' to be your buddy."  

And then we'd have no issues with getting enough female leaders on trips.  Because we're all boys, right?

Edited by JoeBob
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1 hour ago, Eagledad said:

I don't understand the grandstanding, I can't find any posts in this discussion that suggest otherwise.

Barry

It's the tone of the way people refer to it here.  Such as:

40 minutes ago, Saltface said:

Except that the reason why that "girl" Scout is crushing everyone else at the log saw, clay pigeon shoot, and fireman carry race is because they are definitely not normal (as defined by science). Nor would I be comfortable with that person showering/changing/tenting with my daughters. 

On the surface it seems innocuous enough.  But, it leads me to be concerned that folks will treat transgender kids as an oddity or even .  This topic is full of comments about how they don't think transgender kids are "normal".  I'm an optimist, bu t it's hard to trust that all the folks who commented here are going to warmly embrace a transgender scout in their troops.

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1 hour ago, ParkMan said:

It's the tone of the way people refer to it here.  Such as:

On the surface it seems innocuous enough.  But, it leads me to be concerned that folks will treat transgender kids as an oddity or even .  This topic is full of comments about how they don't think transgender kids are "normal".  I'm an optimist, bu t it's hard to trust that all the folks who commented here are going to warmly embrace a transgender scout in their troops.

Maybe we should back up first and have you explain how transgender kids are normal. I wouldn't treat a scout with autism or a bipolar disorder with any less respect than I would a regular scout or one with gender dysphoria, but I definitely wouldn't pretend there aren't issues that need to be dealt with there.

Edited by Saltface

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41 minutes ago, ParkMan said:

It's the tone of the way people refer to it here.  Such as:

On the surface it seems innocuous enough.  But, it leads me to be concerned that folks will treat transgender kids as an oddity or even .  This topic is full of comments about how they don't think transgender kids are "normal".  I'm an optimist, bu t it's hard to trust that all the folks who commented here are going to warmly embrace a transgender scout in their troops.

For me, it appears more as self righteousness than optimism.

You would be amazed of the opinions for how to handle disrespectful scouts that go out of their way to rile adults. They are good humans too. What about serverly retarded scouts? And what about helicopter parents. They are all good humans, but each us have our limits to the giving of our time. Maybe you are better off thinking all adults are good humans as well who find the best place for their volunteering. 

Barry

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I know I'm repeating myself, but I think it is relevant to a number of the posts that have appeared since I last said this:

No unit is required to accept a transgender Scout.

"Thank you for your interest in our troop, but it is the BSA's policy that your child be placed in a troop that is most able to handle circumstances such as this, so we are referring you to the council office for placement in another troop."

Simple.  And council will back you up, because you're following the rules.  Where is little Charlie-was-Suzie going to sleep on the camping trip? Wherever the other troop puts him.  Not your problem.  How great is that?

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3 minutes ago, NJCubScouter said:

I know I'm repeating myself, but I think it is relevant to a number of the posts that have appeared since I last said this:

No unit is required to accept a transgender Scout.

"Thank you for your interest in our troop, but it is the BSA's policy that your child be placed in a troop that is most able to handle circumstances such as this, so we are referring you to the council office for placement in another troop."

Simple.  And council will back you up, because you're following the rules.  Where is little Charlie-was-Suzie going to sleep on the camping trip? Wherever the other troop puts him.  Not your problem.  How great is that?

To quote @gblotter from another thread: Unless you attend a summer camp, or a merit badge university, or a Camporee, or a Cub Scout Day Camp, or an OA Induction, or NYLT, or any other event sponsored at the District, Council, or  National level.

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1 minute ago, Saltface said:

To quote @gblotter from another thread: Unless you attend a summer camp, or a merit badge university, or a Camporee, or a Cub Scout Day Camp, or an OA Induction, or NYLT, or any other event sponsored at the District, Council, or  National level.

Your unit is not required to accept that Scout as a member of your unit even at those events.

You will be required to treat them as a fellow Scout.

Is that really difficult to behave in a Scoutlike manner towards people who are different?

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