Jump to content
blw2

Shoes or Sandals?

Recommended Posts

 things like crocs

 

Yeah - our Troop doesn't allow Crocs - and I won't be caught dead being seen with anyone wearing Crocs - not because they're bad for hiking (and they are that) but because they are the ugliest dang things anyone can ever put on their feet - and that includes those 5-toed running things.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah - our Troop doesn't allow Crocs - and I won't be caught dead being seen with anyone wearing Crocs - not because they're bad for hiking (and they are that) but because they are the ugliest dang things anyone can ever put on their feet - and that includes those 5-toed running things.

 

I thought the very same thing for a many a years, UNIL I put on a pair to use as my camp shoes (walking about camp site and to showers) they are extremely comfortable.  My comfort level out weights fashion these days.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The definition of open-toed shoes varies from one part of the country to the next.

 

post-15031-0-23566100-1461182609_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Came on a trail as a guy completing an extended hike in Filas for the first time was coming off. He said he definitely felt lighter on his feet, but had to walk more gingerly than he would have in boots. That particular trail wasn't very rocky, but I got the impression that he'd continue wearing them in future hikes.

yeah, in the blog I was referring to, the guy sang nothing but praise.

Having hiked rim to rim several times before in traditional hiking boots, he described that "oh my dogs are barking" feeling at the end of the day.... you know it, we've all felt it.... and how with these things there was none of that!

 

There was lots of discussion about how it takes a lot of time to develop the muscles in your feet and legs, that have gone weak in using regular shoes..... and the way of taking a step is very different.... but he made a great case for the benefits of it all.

Sorta like that barefoot survival guy that used to be on TV

 

Part of me really wants to try it....

but I agree.. those things are ugly!  Still, maybe someday I might go to REI and try them on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I learned over the years that socks are the secret to foot comfort if the shoe is appropriate for the activity. I wear Smart Wool socks with thin liners on 100 degree days at summer, backpacking 10,000 feet in the Rockies, and on the Boundery Waters in Canada. The socks repell moisture and dry pretty fast. They just seem to keep the feet more comfortable even while sopping wet on long portage hikes and in the canoe. And I have never had a blister in the hundreds of hundreds of miles I portaged and backpacked.

 

Our troop has a close toed shoe policy 100% of the time. We had a scout mess his toes up once stumbling against a small stump in camp. You only had to see the injury to understand the seriousness of the policy. Closed toed sandles are acceptable for camp shoes on backpacking and Boundary Water treks. And we found a decent quality camp sandal can be a great backup hiking shoe as well. The other adult on our Philmont crew blew out his hiking boot the 2nd day on the trail. He wore his Tevas sandles the rest of the 80 mile trek with no problems.

 

I used to wear running type shoes at summer camp because you would think they would be more comfortable. But scouters on the forum suggested backpacking boots were more comfortable. And they are right; the support of the hiking boot is much better, which makes a big difference when standing and walking all day in 100 degree temperatures and hard packed dusty camps. I couldn't wait to get my running shoes off at the end of the day, but I can wear the hiking boots 24 hrs.

 

Our troop uses the jungle boots stosh uses on our Boundary Waters treks because they are reasonably priced, drain well, and provide plenty of support. But my son and I decided to try the lighter Salomon Techamphibian hiking shoe because they not only drain well, they dry much quicker than the jungle boots. They are also a sturdy shoe that holds up well to heavy back pack weights. Mine are over 10 years old, have several hundred packing and canoe miles and still look almost new. Great shoes; their only disadvantage is no ankle support.

 

I have tried close toed Keens I bought for hiking and beach wear but the toes seem to hold water and mine take days to dry out. They look stylish, but they can't compete with the Salomon in comfort, support and drainage, so they never get worn. I can't backpack anymore as a result of a recent knee injury, but if I did, I would try my Salomons Techamphibians before my Salomon backpacking boots. At least on broken in trails anyways. I like them that much.

 

I believe footwear comfort can make or break the enjoyment of outdoor activities weather it's a hot summer day at camp or a 100 mile hiking trek. But the socks are just as important for enjoying your adventure, if not more so. Some of our cocky experienced scouts wear some pretty low quality foot gear (cheap Walmart running shoes) because they are trying to go low weight. But they never scrimp on the socks.

 

Barry

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've hiked around 6 miles on the AT with some Teva sandals -https://www.rei.com/product/830289/teva-tanza-leather-sandals-mens.  They were comfortable and I only stubbed my toe a couple of times and my feet really weren't that dirty at the end of the day.   :p

 

In all seriousness, they were really comfortable, but not practical.  I tend to wear them everywhere except hiking.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know about that - REI and Erewhon sells all kinds of "trendy" shoes in their "Hiking Department" including Teva Sandals and water shoes.  I like your first thought better - if you can see skin (and please - no socks - never wear socks with sandals - and the real answer should be leave the sandals to women unless you're a "granola-head" (aka "hippie") (and no, I don't consider flip-flops to be sandals), you're wearing a sandal.

 

"granola head" ?  "hippie"?  "women"?

 

Legionary_zpsvp1hxlhl.png

 

When you go by the Via Aurelia

That runs from the City to Gaul,

Remember the Luck of the Soldier         

Who rose to be master of all!

He carried the sword and the buckler,

He mounted his guard on the Wall,

Till the Legions elected him Caesar,

And he rose to be master of all!

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah - our Troop doesn't allow Crocs - and I won't be caught dead being seen with anyone wearing Crocs - not because they're bad for hiking (and they are that) but because they are the ugliest dang things anyone can ever put on their feet - and that includes those 5-toed running things.

The one endorsement I will give Crocs is for medicinal purposes.  If you ever have Plantar Fasciitis, wear crocs every minute that you're home --- never take a step in bare feet, and they'll speed the healing process.  Sure they're ugly, but like that worn out shirt your spouse wants to throw out, they're perfect as long as you're not seen in public wearing them.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll admit I love crocs. Most comfortable things I've ever worn. I get a lot of good natured grief, but I don't care. I started out life in special shoes and a Dennis brown bar. I'm not sure my feet have ever been right. My latest foot related expense was very fancy orthotics custom made for my feet. They seem to be helping, but they are so bulky and big none of my footwear fits correctly anymore. Just bought new hiking boots yesterday as a result.

 

Comparatively, the crocs I have are decidedly less expensive, very comfortable, and relieve much of the pain I experience.

 

Luckily, I'm pretty goofy looking to start with, so no one expects me to appear fashionable.

Edited by Tiger Foot

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I keep requesting Crocs for birthdays, Fathers day, etc.  My sons refuse to buy them.  The are overpriced for what must be 20 cents' worth of materials.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The one endorsement I will give Crocs is for medicinal purposes.  If you ever have Plantar Fasciitis, wear crocs every minute that you're home --- never take a step in bare feet, and they'll speed the healing process.  Sure they're ugly, but like that worn out shirt your spouse wants to throw out, they're perfect as long as you're not seen in public wearing them.

Thanks for the suggestion, been using the black Sole inserts.

 

I would feel safer walking barefoot down the street than in a house with Legos.  :confused:

Edited by RememberSchiff

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah - our Troop doesn't allow Crocs - and I won't be caught dead being seen with anyone wearing Crocs - not because they're bad for hiking (and they are that) but because they are the ugliest dang things anyone can ever put on their feet - and that includes those 5-toed running things.

Crocs are ugly, but they are also extremely comfortable and pretty lightweight. I use them as camp shoes/water crossing shoes while backpacking, and for going to the beach.  I'm too old and ugly to worry about appearance. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The one endorsement I will give Crocs is for medicinal purposes.  If you ever have Plantar Fasciitis, wear crocs every minute that you're home --- never take a step in bare feet, and they'll speed the healing process.  Sure they're ugly, but like that worn out shirt your spouse wants to throw out, they're perfect as long as you're not seen in public wearing them.

 

This is my current struggle!  fighting it for a year now

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There used to be metal blades sticking up out of the ground where farmers could scrape the mud off their boots before coming into the house.  With crocs, ya just hose off your feet, you're good to go.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to wear crocs all the time.... have several pair

IMO, they are comfortable for daily knocking around.... but I slowly learned to not like them for extended walking.... as in shopping with the wife or whatever.

They also don't always provide traction on even slightly slippery surfaces

and I have gotten poked right through the sole a few times with some long thorns and such...

Now, I still wear them a lot, but only for times when i need to step outside around the house.... stuff like that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×