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Sniktaw

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About Sniktaw

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  1. Thanks everyone, I knew I would get a lot of ideas here! We are already doing some of the things mentioned but can definitely use many of the other ideas.
  2. Hi everyone. I am a Webelos I den leader and would like advice on helping the boys transition to Boy Scouts. The requirements for the next year and a half are different enough from Cubs, and we have plans for visiting troops, but I need concrete ideas for how to introduce the Boy Scout mindset to my Webelos. As far as activities, one obstacle I feel stuck on is that we meet for an hour during the week when it is dark, so our outdoor activity possibilities are limited, and an hour isn't a lot of time to get bigger things accomplished. We are shooting for one weekend outdoor activity a month, but of course many Scouts only come to weeknight meetings. But I digress--what I'm really looking for is that mindset change. My ultimate goal is to get these boys to stay in Scouting so I want their transition to be as smooth as possible. What should I be doing to help them?
  3. I think it depends on why the boy is joining--if they are gung-ho for doing all the requirements, sure, do it at home. If they are just joining to have fun with the experience, let them have the experience that everyone else is having now. Earn the Bobcat plus whatever the rest of the den is working on. My big worry is encouraging the new Bear to buy a blue shirt they're only going to wear for a few months before they go with tan in Webelos.
  4. Personal Sleepovers/Scout Functions? When is it not ok?

    The idea that you are worrying about this makes me sad. You shouldn't stop your family from having normal activities nor stop yourself from being a normal mother because you volunteer in an organization that works with children. I have thought about the reverse--At Scouts, the rules say I can't be trusted to be in a room with 6 second graders without another adult present, but when I was a teacher, I could be in a room alone with 23 second graders all day, every day. And now I can pick up one of the second graders from school and drive him home with my son so they can play together. And amazingly. . . I can be completely alone with either one of my sons and be absolutely sure that I won't hurt them. Follow the rules of the organization when you're there. But don't start doubting yourself. You know you're not going to harm the kids at your kid's sleepover. If the other parents don't trust you, they won't let the kids go to your house, nothing to do with Scouts. If we tried to live our personal lives by the rules imposed by schools, Scouts, church, etc., we would be incredibly isolated because we couldn't ever trust anybody.
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