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Young District/Council Volunteers

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I was asked to consider serving on my council's alumni committee today, and I received a packet of various alumni initiatives being started across the BSA. One of the ideas in the packet was to reach-out to college-age and young adults to serve at the council and district-level as registered volunteers.

 

Having been an assistant NYLT course director and volunteer for my daughter's Venturing crew, I know the capabilities of young adults. However, there's a few roadblocks I see in the BSA:

  1. The only volunteer, registered positions available for adults 18-20 years-old are: Merit Badge Counselor (42 & 42F), Camp Staff (49), College Scouter Reserve (92). I reached out to my council registrar to confirm this, and her guide confirmed that every other position would require an individual to be at-least 21.
  2. In my council, we're in the process of trying to integrate new volunteers into the existing hierarchy. I'm trying to imagine a dozen college-age adults serving on district operating committees in a very tradition-driven council.

Curious what other councils are doing to support an alumni program and recruiting/selecting young adults for council and district-level positions. Thoughts? Haiku? Experiences?

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Sign them up as MBCs or reserves, depending on their particular skill sets.

See if the local college's APO will give them the social structure they may desire.

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Even though they have limited opportunities at first, they'll have gain connections and experience.  In due time they'll be ready to take on more responsibility.

 

I like the scheme.  I've been in several districts and even the good ones tend to be hidebound, staffed with older/elderly folks that have served a long time but may be stuck on "we've always done it this way."  

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College Scouter Reserve sounds like the most appropriate registration code for what you have in mind.  Just for clarification, 18 -- 20 year olds can also be ASMs if registered with a troop, and of course Venturers.

 

It doesn't really matter what the registration code is, it matters what you intend to have them do to help the program.  If I was trying this, one area I would consider that's a little outside the box would be as Instructors for youth leadership training programs, especially if that could get you some good training outside rather than in a classroom.  I would probably also try to have them staff district and council events like camporees, or have them act as adults for new or struggling troops.

 

Basically take advantage of their enthusiasm and their probable penchant for getting outdoors and getting a little dirty.  Most especially I would make this a co-ed outreach, look for former female camp staffers and Venturers to supplement the obvious Eagle Scout pool you'll probably start with.

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Just because they are " College Scouter Reserve" or a MBC does not mean they cannot do 'additional duties." When I was an 18-20 year old Scouter, I served on the OA chapter (district) and OA lodge (council) levels, I also did other jobs. As T2Eagle said, I staffed and was on the committee for district and council events. I also served on the council training team, specifically as SPL of the JLT course, today's NYLT.

 

I have also used young ASMs and older Scouts to staff district training back in the day.

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The code doesn't matter but the training does. They must be trained for their position.

 

I assume everyone knows this but thought it stood mentioning.

Edited by Back Pack

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The code doesn't matter but the training does. They must be trained for their position.

 

I assume everyone knows this but thought it stood mentioning.

I'm not sure what you mean.  Every Scouter must be currently YPT trained.  I'm not sure what position specific training there is for College Reserve, I couldn't find any.  I think there is something available for MB counselors.  But there is no universal requirement for adults to receive training beyond YPT; there are, or at least were, some councils which had tried a pilot program where every scouter did have to be position trained.  I'm not sure if any councils are still doing that, but it is not universal.

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I'm not sure what you mean.  Every Scouter must be currently YPT trained.  I'm not sure what position specific training there is for College Reserve, I couldn't find any.  I think there is something available for MB counselors.  But there is no universal requirement for adults to receive training beyond YPT; there are, or at least were, some councils which had tried a pilot program where every scouter did have to be position trained.  I'm not sure if any councils are still doing that, but it is not universal.

If I am coded as CR but am an ASM, the code doesn't matter. Having IOLS and Leader specific and YPT does. If I am an MBC having YPT and MBC training matters.

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I'm not sure what you mean.  Every Scouter must be currently YPT trained.  I'm not sure what position specific training there is for College Reserve, I couldn't find any.  I think there is something available for MB counselors.  But there is no universal requirement for adults to receive training beyond YPT; there are, or at least were, some councils which had tried a pilot program where every scouter did have to be position trained.  I'm not sure if any councils are still doing that, but it is not universal.

 

I know right now; there are several councils out east requiring all registered, adult leaders to be "trained", and I know there is at-least one council either in Oklahoma or Texas going to that system. I believe they are staggering the integration of the plan though, e.g. first year: all unit leaders trained, second year: all direct contact adult leaders trained, third year: all registered adult leaders trained.

Edited by 4CouncilsScouter

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I know right now; there are several councils out east requiring all registered, adult leaders to be "trained", and I know there is at-least one council either in Oklahoma or Texas going to that system. I believe they are staggering the integration of the plan though, e.g. first year: all unit leaders trained, second year: all direct contact adult leaders trained, third year: all registered adult leaders trained.

 

Our council was part of the push to make sure all registered SMs were trained. This was a pilot program back in 2010. When I took over at SM we made sure all ASMs had YPT (of course), as well as IOLS and leader-specific. We also asked them to have the online training (climb safely, trek safely, safe swim, wx hazards, etc.). We also made sure every trek to a national HA base had a minimum of two WRFA-trained adults and several Scouts with the same training. Now seven years later, out of 15 ASMs all but one has this as the training baseline. It is well worth the effort.

 

I had thought having IOLS and LS training was mandatory in all councils by now. I guess I lost track of where the rest of the country was since we were part of the pilot project way back when.

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The code doesn't matter but the training does. They must be trained for their position.

 

I assume everyone knows this but thought it stood mentioning.

 

I believe William "Green Bar Bill" Hillcourt said it best: "Train 'em. Trust 'em LET THEM LEAD!"

 

I am a firm believer in "knowledge, skills, and abilities," and do not believe a Scout who turns 18 goes back to knowing nothing. When I was on the council training committee, I had Brownsea 22, today's NYLT, and it was WB  for Scouts. I took "Train the Trainer" as part of the JLT staff development, but that was it. After going through BA22, and being an a true Scout-run troop, the only thing I learned new when I tool the old SM Fundamentals Training was the paperwork aspect of Scouting.  Since all IOLS does is cover basic S-T-2-1 skills, any First Class Scout or higher should have the knowledge, skills and abilities to serve as an instructor. When I have used Scouts for IOLS, I have not been let down.

 

When I worked with the program committee,again I used the training I had as a Scout to get the job done.  

 

One of the things that chapped my hide as an 18-23 year old Scouter working on the district and council levels ( specifically the OA)  was that many thought I didn't know squat due to my age. I thought it was humorous when  I was OA chapter adviser, and a SM told me "You don't know anything about the OA."

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I believe William "Green Bar Bill" Hillcourt said it best: "Train 'em. Trust 'em LET THEM LEAD!"

 

I am a firm believer in "knowledge, skills, and abilities," and do not believe a Scout who turns 18 goes back to knowing nothing. When I was on the council training committee, I had Brownsea 22, today's NYLT, and it was WB  for Scouts. I took "Train the Trainer" as part of the JLT staff development, but that was it. After going through BA22, and being an a true Scout-run troop, the only thing I learned new when I tool the old SM Fundamentals Training was the paperwork aspect of Scouting.  Since all IOLS does is cover basic S-T-2-1 skills, any First Class Scout or higher should have the knowledge, skills and abilities to serve as an instructor. When I have used Scouts for IOLS, I have not been let down.

 

Frankly, I believe Eagle Scouts should be given a pass on IOLS when they become adults, especially if they re-up from Scouting as an 18 year-old. Leader training is more about the rules and regulations; something the youth don't get too much of.

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I believe William "Green Bar Bill" Hillcourt said it best: "Train 'em. Trust 'em LET THEM LEAD!"

 

I am a firm believer in "knowledge, skills, and abilities," and do not believe a Scout who turns 18 goes back to knowing nothing. When I was on the council training committee, I had Brownsea 22, today's NYLT, and it was WB  for Scouts. I took "Train the Trainer" as part of the JLT staff development, but that was it. After going through BA22, and being an a true Scout-run troop, the only thing I learned new when I tool the old SM Fundamentals Training was the paperwork aspect of Scouting.  Since all IOLS does is cover basic S-T-2-1 skills, any First Class Scout or higher should have the knowledge, skills and abilities to serve as an instructor. When I have used Scouts for IOLS, I have not been let down.

 

When I worked with the program committee,again I used the training I had as a Scout to get the job done.  

 

One of the things that chapped my hide as an 18-23 year old Scouter working on the district and council levels ( specifically the OA)  was that many thought I didn't know squat due to my age. I thought it was humorous when  I was OA chapter adviser, and a SM told me "You don't know anything about the OA."

 

Truth be told, I have a young man in my crew who wants to become a professional Scouter, and he will be moving to a college about eight hours north of where we meet. Obliviously, this isn't very conducive for him to be regularly active with our unit, so I've been working with him to find a new crew closer to his college. During this, he brought up the idea of staying registered in our crew to still be considered a Venturer, but he would find a council/district position in his new area. His justification being that these positions should be more project or event focused, in theory, and it would fit his schedule more than weekly meetings. 

 

When I heard about the push for younger volunteers, his situation came to mind. It's interesting hearing someone else's experiences in this.

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My thoughts regarding the young man coincide with what the 9th  Doctor said upon meeting Rose Taylor: "RUN FOR YOUR LIFE!" :cool:

 

Seriously though, if he is considering a professional career, he needs to get involved on the district level as a soon as possible, and even then it will not fully prepare him for the profession. Been there, done that. Only good things to come out of my time as a pro were A) meeting some great volunteers I am friends with, and B) meeting my wife.

 

That being said, maintaining registration as a Venturer, UNIT (emphais) Scouter Reserve, or an ASM so that he can help when he is home is great. One of my Eagles did that while he was in college and while deployed the first time.

 

Another option is the COLLEGE (emphasis) Scouter Reserve in the council his college will be in. College Scouter Reserve and MBC are the two district level positions that under 21 year olds can do. and CSR is more project oriented instead of unit oriented. If used right, he could get some expreince and make sure he wants to go the professional rou

 

Frankly, I believe Eagle Scouts should be given a pass on IOLS when they become adults, especially if they re-up from Scouting as an 18 year-old. Leader training is more about the rules and regulations; something the youth don't get too much of.

 

Mixed emotions on this. Unfortunately I have met some "Eagles" who cannot do basic T-2-1 skills because they "took that class at summer camp so long ago." Yes, a true quote from one at a first aid event using T-2-1 first aid skills at camporee back in October.

 

And then there are those Eagles who worked summer camp, did Philmont, attended and staffed WB, etc and are "untrained" because they need IOLS. Yes a 3 beader was "untrained" because he needed IOLS. Same for the two Eagles who had been to Philmont, one of them twice.  I got them all 'trained" by having them staff IOLS.

 

I personally like the "challenge" option that was allowed at one time. Don't know if it is still since the revision. But we had several Eagles, and other experienced outdoorsman do the challenge with no problems. One of them, is a Life who served on my last IOLS course. Guy who took over as training chairman after me didn't want it to appear as favoritism or nepotism to have his son automatically be IOLS trained. :)

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