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Jameson76

What are the BSA priorities??

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The unit should set its own priorities provided operations conform to the BSA program.  Some folks are very community/service focused, and are big on visiting historic sites, and participating in patriotic ceremonies.  Others units may be into old school outdoor stuff, while others are trail preppies.   Some folks are fixated on inclusivity......Other units may struggle to achieve the most basic tasks, e.g. communicating via email or phone.

I believe there is enough leeway to run a good program even if/when National strays.  No need to blame national for our own failures or mental illness.

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16 hours ago, TAHAWK said:

From a peak of 6.5 million Scouts in 1972, membership declined to a low of 4.3 million in 1980.

 

14 hours ago, Onslow said:

The unit should set its own priorities provided operations conform to the BSA program. 

BSA seems to be at some kind of organizational crossroads as a result of membership standards changes, litigation over past sexual abuse, and financial difficulties.  Given the uncertainty and BSA's needs -- membership, in particular -- I think it is fair to consider changing the organizational level within BSA that determines what members will be doing and how they will be doing it.  That is, the level of the organization that decides on specific details of programs (such as individual rank or activity requirements), membership eligibility (age, sex, belief), and individual unit organization (for example, separate boy/girl dens and troops versus fully co-ed).  In our hyper-litigious society, there have to be some nationwide standards in critical areas such as youth protection and physical safety.  But Scouting as a program lives or dies at the local unit level.  Maybe it is time for BSA National to restrict itself to areas that have to have nationwide uniformity, but otherwise just set some general program goals and boundaries ("must haves" and "no-nos").  Within those boundaries allow local Chartered Organizations, Scout leaders, and Scouts to adapt and experiment based on local conditions, with the approval of local Councils.   Train 'em, Trust 'em, Let 'em Lead.   Give units the leeway to do what works for them within the framework of the greater BSA program.

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