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skeptic

Bryan on Scouting; First Woodbadge at Schiff

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Interesting piece regarding some early historical records from the first course, including a copy of the schedule.  Many of us that took our WB under some semblance of that earlier course likely feel much of it is sorely lacking today.  Having taken it in 1981 or so, and then actually taught on the first edition of the 20th Century course, I am very aware of the differences.  There is some positive material in the current versions, but from my perspective, we miss out on a lot in the modern course.  It is like the difference between backpacking and car camping; you learn far more "responsibility" when you have to take care of yourself with what you carry.  You are more likely to be self-sufficient if you have regularly backpacked, especially some real long terms. In the case of WB, learning and "using" basic core skills is far superior to just having them given to you on paper or in books as references.  Still, the modern course does have some benefit, particularly if the course staff sort of add in a few things along the lines of what was just noted.

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1. Scoutcraft through First Class - eight continuous, full days.

2. 1 Leadership Skills in the context of outdoor program, with learners tenting out over eight, continuous full days.

(Modified to "weekend" course of six days

3. More abstract leadership course with five minutes of Scoutcraft (how to light a backpacking stove), often by staff who don't know how to light the stove.  5 days.

"Since its inception, Boy Scouting has relied heavily on an outdoor program to achieve its objectives. This program meets more of the purposes of Scouting than any other single feature."  B.S.A., Guide to Safe Scouting (2018) at p. 47.  :rolleyes:

 

 

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17 hours ago, skeptic said:

Interesting piece regarding some early historical records from the first course, including a copy of the schedule.  Many of us that took our WB under some semblance of that earlier course likely feel much of it is sorely lacking today.  Having taken it in 1981 or so, and then actually taught on the first edition of the 20th Century course, I am very aware of the differences.  There is some positive material in the current versions, but from my perspective, we miss out on a lot in the modern course.  It is like the difference between backpacking and car camping; you learn far more "responsibility" when you have to take care of yourself with what you carry.  You are more likely to be self-sufficient if you have regularly backpacked, especially some real long terms. In the case of WB, learning and "using" basic core skills is far superior to just having them given to you on paper or in books as references.  Still, the modern course does have some benefit, particularly if the course staff sort of add in a few things along the lines of what was just noted.

I have wondered why OA was not purposed with teaching the old Wood Badge course. Sort of full circle, OA promotes Scout camping so why not Arrowmen teach new adult leaders?

 

 

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The typical Scouter is put off by being taught by Scouts.  BSA appropriately added junior staff to Wood Badge, an experiment tried in 1959.  See it; believe it.

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9 minutes ago, TAHAWK said:

The typical Scouter is put off by being taught by Scouts.  BSA appropriately added junior staff to Wood Badge, an experiment tried in 1959.  See it; believe it.

Sad but true. I had to team up youth and adult staffers for IOLS. Adult staffer was to keep the adult participants in line if needed.

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Our Venturers on staff in 2008, 2009, and 2017 absolutely stunned the participants.   We didn't have to raise a finger.  The best lesson they ever saw about the youth leadership aspect of the Patrol Method.:D

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