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After my last snarky remark, I was just thinking what if the forum had scouting equivalent of emoticons? Like:

 

-88- Figure eight on a byte?

=x= Clove hitch?

_-_ Smoky-the-bear hat (help?)

 

Clearly, this is egg ain't all fried yet, but maybe you can reply with better ones.

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Oh, I thought this was going to be another Square Knot rants. But Hey, mine is simple: =AOL==DL=

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two half hitches:

ǂ or ≠ or =

 

taut line:

Ɇ or ≡

 

bowline:

|)―

 

sheet bend:

□∩

 

 

Timber Hitch:

--∞∞∞<

 

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two half hitches:

ǂ or ≠ or =

 

taut line:

Ɇ or ≡

 

bowline:

|)―

 

sheet bend:

□∩

 

 

Timber Hitch:

--∞∞∞<

≠ looks like a clove hitch to me.

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two half hitches:

ǂ or ≠ or =

 

taut line:

Ɇ or ≡

 

bowline:

|)―

 

sheet bend:

□∩

 

 

Timber Hitch:

--∞∞∞<

Two half hitches is a clove hitch around the standing end of a rope...

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Busted JoeBob, that second image is wrong. For a double half hitch the two ends of the rope go out opposite directions from each other (if that makes any sense at all) and not out the same side as shown in the photo. Anyway, google double half hitch and you won't see another photo like the one from bollweeviltroop99. It is a clove hitch on a rope. I haven't a clue if it makes a difference, though.

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Since pictures aren't convincing you, let's try function. (Hey, I argued vehemently that a Thieve's Knot

http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=thieve%27s+knot&id=FB66B87C963177DB87845E008DD748C72E64429E&FORM=IQFRBA

was just another Square Knot, until I was show how they functioned differently.)

 

A clove hitch only stays tight if tension on the working end stays in the direction that it leaves the knot. If you pull the working end of a clove hitch perpendicular to the knot, or back against the knot, a clove hitch comes untied. Don't believe me? Using a nylon line, tie a canoe bobbing in the current to a round steel post with a clove hitch. Don't be gone longer than five minutes!

 

Two half hitches, whether tied the regular way or with the second hitch reversed for a neater appearance, will not loosen with tension from any direction.

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So two half hitches is still the same as a clove hitch? But by reversing the second hitch, in either case, you're saying it's a better knot as it won't come loose. You just need a new name for reversing the second hitch. By the powers vested in me, I now pronounce this new knot the JobBob Hitch.

 

I agree that a clove hitch won't hold a canoe. Been there done that. While looking at images for this great debate I found the spar hitch, rolling hitch, and constrictor hitch, http://scoutpioneering.files.wordpress.com/2013/03/hitches1.jpg, all of which seem like they'd hold the canoe better. The spar hitch was originally meant to keep horses from wandering, so kind of like a canoe. The constrictor looks easy and a bit more secure than the spar. There's also a knot called a double constrictor.

 

Enough with knots. Time to start thinking about big bird, and how she's going to be cooked.

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So two half hitches is still the same as a clove hitch? But by reversing the second hitch, in either case, you're saying it's a better knot as it won't come loose. You just need a new name for reversing the second hitch. By the powers vested in me, I now pronounce this new knot the JobBob Hitch.

 

I agree that a clove hitch won't hold a canoe. Been there done that. While looking at images for this great debate I found the spar hitch, rolling hitch, and constrictor hitch, http://scoutpioneering.files.wordpress.com/2013/03/hitches1.jpg, all of which seem like they'd hold the canoe better. The spar hitch was originally meant to keep horses from wandering, so kind of like a canoe. The constrictor looks easy and a bit more secure than the spar. There's also a knot called a double constrictor.

 

Enough with knots. Time to start thinking about big bird, and how she's going to be cooked.

"So two half hitches is still the same as a clove hitch?" No sir! Definitely not the same knot!

The best use of a clove hitch is the starting point of a lashing.

 

I've heard the Two Half Hitches with the reversed second hitch called a 'Butterfly Knot' in knitting circles. (Please don't tell anyone I knew anything about knitting?) In climbing, a Butterfly Knot is something else.

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So two half hitches is still the same as a clove hitch? But by reversing the second hitch, in either case, you're saying it's a better knot as it won't come loose. You just need a new name for reversing the second hitch. By the powers vested in me, I now pronounce this new knot the JobBob Hitch.

 

I agree that a clove hitch won't hold a canoe. Been there done that. While looking at images for this great debate I found the spar hitch, rolling hitch, and constrictor hitch, http://scoutpioneering.files.wordpress.com/2013/03/hitches1.jpg, all of which seem like they'd hold the canoe better. The spar hitch was originally meant to keep horses from wandering, so kind of like a canoe. The constrictor looks easy and a bit more secure than the spar. There's also a knot called a double constrictor.

 

Enough with knots. Time to start thinking about big bird, and how she's going to be cooked.

The only way to get to the bottom of this great mystery is over a beer. We will also have plenty of leftover bird, so come on over.

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